Organic Gardening

Learn how to use natural, organic gardening methods to grow the freshest food in your own garden.

Country Lore: December 2017/January 2018

Submitted by MOTHER EARTH NEWS Readers

Readers’ tips about how to build an emergency greenhouse, repurposed seedling trays, keeping moose and deer out of your garden, and more.


How Accurate are Soil pH Testers?

By Robert Pavlis

A Master Gardener gauges the precision of home test kits.


Grow a Year-Round Indoor Salad Garden

By Peter Burke

Use this unique technique to grow salad greens in a limited space, even in winter.


Mercantile

MOTHER’s product picks for December 2017 / January 2018


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Horticultural Vinegar for Weed Control, Part 2

By Miriam Van Zant, Community Conservation Botanical Garden of Southern Illinois

Horticultural vinegar, diluted to 15 to 20 percent acetic acid, is used as an ingredient for making defoliants for controlling weeds, including poison ivy. This is Part 2 of a 2-part series on on using horticultural vinegar. It gives instructions and formulas for making herbicides and includes new formulas which work in acidic wetland soils. Part 1 explains the reasons to use horticultural vinegar, why new formulas are needed, and considers other relatively non-toxic methods of weed control.


A Homegrown Supply of Berries

By Rebecca Harrold

We grow - and eat- our own strawberries, raspberries, blackberries, and (hopefully) blueberries.


Horticultural Vinegar for Weed Control, Part 1

By Miriam Van Zant, Community Conservation Botanical Garden of Southern Illinois

Horticultural vinegar, diluted to 15 to 20 percent acetic acid, is used as an ingredient for making defoliants for controlling weeds, including poison ivy. The formula containing defoliants can be used in place of carcinogenic and other agricultural chemicals for controlling weeds that harm wildlife, pets, and all of us. This post breaks down why you should consider using horticultural vinegar for health and environment.


Growing and Seed Saving Can Be Done on a High-Elevation Mountain Homestead

By Pamela Sherman

We live at 8,300 feet in a mountain draw in the Rockies with screaming winds. It's accepted knowledge in these parts that “you can't grow food in the mountains.” This makes perfect, logical sense. But we did try, we kept trying, and we've been doing it now for over 25 years. With plants, never say “never.” Just try planting and adapting and keep learning from your experience.