Mother Earth News Blogs >

Real Food
Savor the flavors of everyday real food, fresh from the garden or stored on your pantry shelves.

Make Korean Kimchi from Any Garden Cabbage

14940239_1373878372642054_3373066275628437845_o

My husband is part Korean, and kimchi was a big part of his life growing up. kimchi is a fermented blend of cabbage, chili peppers, garlic, onions, and other spices often eaten with every meal in Korea.  Kimchi is rich in vitamins A and C, and due to its fermentation process is also rich in beneficial gut-boosting lactobacilli bacteria.  Here in America our diet lacks fermented foods, and the beneficial microbes that are needed for a healthy digestive system.

We try to incorporate fermented foods into our diet, and kimchi is so tasty that it makes that task easy.  I promised to make him some from our garden, but all of the Asian cabbage that we planted went to seed due to a warm spell in spring. Our green cabbage thrived all spring, and we ended up with huge heads of regular old cabbage. 

13667726_584576121719540_5103371694156305295_o

Not wanting to make quarts of sauerkraut that wasn't going to be eaten I decided to try to make the imchi using what we had.  After all, homesteading is about using what you have.

003

Kimchi Recipe

Ingredients

1 large cabbage head
1 pound daikon root
8 green onion
8 cloves garlic (grated)...
• ginger root (grated)
• 2 tbsp fish sauce
• 1/2 cup water
• 8 tbsp Korean red pepper flakes or red pepper paste
• 3 tbsp sugar
• 1/2 cup sea salt

Directions

1. Cut cabbage in 2 inch sections, sprinkle with salt, cover with water, and let sit 2 hours.

004

3. Drain and rinse 3 times, and allow to dry.

4. Chop daicon into matchstick sized pieces.

5. Chop green onion into 1 inch sections.

6. Add cabbage to diacon and green onion, and toss.

009

Prepare brine:

1. Add sugar, water, garlic, and ginger. Mix and add Korean red pepper.

2. Add brine to veggies and stir until fully coated.

3. Pack tightly into jars, and seal.

003 (4)

4. Leave at room temp 2-5 days.

5. Each day push cabbage below brine surface to release gases.

6. Taste each day until satisfied.

7. Store in fridge. The full flavor is best after a week or two in the fridge. This will keep up to 6 months or more in the fridge.

004 (2)

Melissa Souza lives on a 1-acre, organically managed homestead property in rural Washington State where she raises backyard chickens and meat rabbits and grows plums, apples, pears, a variety of berries, and all the produce her family needs. She loves to inspire other families to save money, be together, and take steps toward self-reliance no matter where they live. Connect with her on Facebook.


All MOTHER EARTH NEWS community bloggers have agreed to follow our Blogging Guidelines, and they are responsible for the accuracy of their posts. To learn more about the author of this post, click on their byline link at the top of the page.

Support Your Local Chicken Farmer or Be One

This chicken farm has it all! I see chicken coops, a hillside of grape vines, Red Wattle heritage pigs, a veggie garden and quite a view. On my recent trip to Temecula, California, I went exploring both the wine culture and farm culture in this historic town. Once the location of the Vail Cattle Ranch spreading across 87,500 acres; Temecula is now a collection of housing developments, a historic downtown, vineyards, and small farms.

I was having dinner at E.A.T. (Extraordinary Artisan Table) in old town Temecula, devouring some of the best farm-to-table fare I have had anywhere.  When I told chef Leah how good the food was she said “The egg on top of your mushroom soup is from a new chicken farmer, Cory Shallow and his eggs are the best!” I had to agree it was an excellent egg and said a visit to the farm would make my day. That night Leah set up a meeting with Cory on very short notice.  The next morning she met me at Cory’s farm to see for myself where the egg I had with dinner came from.

Cory’s dad bought this property in 2001 to build their home. He envisioned it as a place to grow grapes and make wine for his personal use. Cory attended Cal-Poly after graduating high school in Temecula and didn’t have plans to work the family farm. After graduating with a BS in Agricultural and Environmental Plant Science Cory applied for two jobs he expected to land. When neither job came through his dad asked him to consider working on the family farm which made perfect sense.

Cory w broilers

Shortly after returning home to work the family farm the idea was hatched to raise chickens. The family home and six acres were a perfect set up where rolling cages with broilers could augment the land. The broilers would eat insects and fertilize the ground with chicken droppings as the cages rolled through the vines every couple of days.

Broilers and Layers

The plan is to raise 20-40 broilers at a time and sell them to individuals or a CSA.  A Great Pyrenees pup named Couleson and his pal Thor provide predator control. Cory told me he can hear eight month old Couleson barking in the fields late at night probably chasing off coyotes. The coyotes try and get an occasional chicken dinner, and will also bite into the hose lines that water the crops to get a drink, causing extra work for Cory and Jack to repair. In a dry climate every living thing seeks out water.

Cory with laying hens

With ample space onsite, two hen houses were built to house laying hens. Black Australian Orpingtons, Plymouth Barred Rock, and Golden Sex Link chickens were chosen for egg output temperament, and heat tolerence. Cory aims to produce 1,000 eggs per week for E.A.T. restaurant just five miles away in Temecula.  He is already up to 800 per week; a great start considering he only starting selling to E.A.T. in April of 2017.

Chickens, Wine and Pigs

As if that weren’t enough farm goodness Cory and his dad are raising Red Wattle heritage pigs. These lovely looking pigs were in hog heaven the day I visited; especially when Cory turned the hose on the three little pigs. The piggy’s put on a show of rolling and cavorting in the water spray and mud, something a factory raised pig would never experience.

Cory and Jack only plan on raising up to six pigs per year. The pigs help improve the landscape, and put farm-fresh pork on the table occasionally. These pigs are raised in a humane manner and when it’s time prepare them for the table are dispatched with care and respect. The result is a superb level of eating quality not seen from factory raised pigs.

cory and Leah

I would love to return to Temecula in a year and see how Cory’s farm project is going. He’s a great example of a young man going off to college and returning home to do good in the world. Cory is passionate about making his dad’s farm and the world a better place by using sustainable farming techniques. From what I saw at their farm and tasted at E.A.T. he’s doing a great job.

Kurt Jacobsohas been a chef for 40 years and, after being schooled in the U.S. Coast Guard, he trained in many restaurants under both kind and maniac chefs. Kurt is starting his fourth year of container and raised-bed organic gardening and is volunteering at Wilbur’s Farm in Kingsville, Maryland, to learn real organic gardening. For this and other recipes using garden greens, and more fresh veggies check out his food blog. For tasty travel ideas check out Kurt's travel blog, TasteofTravel2.com. Read all of Kurt's MOTHER EARTH NEWS posts here.


All MOTHER EARTH NEWS community bloggers have agreed to follow our Blogging Guidelines, and they are responsible for the accuracy of their posts. To learn more about the author of this post, click on their byline link at the top of the page.

Thirst-Quenching Drinks from Rhubarb Concentrate

rhubarb limeaid

Anyone who grows rhubarb knows the simple joy of seeing it peak through the soil in early spring.  It’s as if it is calling to all of the other plants and vegetables saying: “What are you waiting for?  It’s time to grow!”  If you don’t grow it yourself, it will be one of the first local products available at your farmer’s market or from your neighbor’s garden.

While the traditional strawberry-rhubarb pie is an excellent use for this early garden veggie, there are a plethora of other great options – from alternative desserts like crisps and bars, to ice cream sauce, or savory dishes like pork loin with rhubarb sauce.  But one of the things we love doing with this sour stalk is creating delicious beverages to celebrate the start of gardening season.

We start with a rhubarb concentrate, which is about half-way between a simple syrup and a lemonade (the recipe we like actually includes maple syrup, mint, and lime so technically you could call this a “Rhubarb-lime-maple-mint concentrate”).  The concentrate can be saved in the fridge (or frozen) and used in a variety of recipes to create delicious drinks and cocktails. 

The rhubarbarita is a favorite of mine, but I also enjoy a less sugary rhubarb spritzer, and the more traditional rhubarb limeade is a kid-favorite.  Our recipe for the concentrate is inspired by a recipe for sparkling rhubarb lemonade on Food 52, but we swap in lime for lemon (we find this makes a better mixed drink) and trade most of the processed sugar for local maple syrup which adds a unique taste to the final product.  Instead of adding sparkling water to the whole batch, we save the concentrate.  When the time comes, we make each person the drink that they prefer.

Rhubarb Concentrate in Pot

Rhubarb (Lime-Maple-Mint) Concentrate

Ingredients

5 cups coarsely chopped rhubarb
3 ½ cups water
¼ cup sugar
½ cup maple syrup
3 sprigs of mint
Peel of 1 lime
1 cup lime juice

Directions

1. Place all ingredients in a large stock pot.  Bring to a boil, then reduce heat to a simmer and simmer for about 15-20 minutes (until the rhubarb is mushy). 

2. Strain into a separate container. 

3. Set aside to cool.  Can be refrigerated for up to a week.

Rhubarb Concentrate

Drink Variations

You can use this rhubarb concentrate to make a variety of drinks, I encourage you to play with the combinations and concentrations; if you like a sweeter spritzer or less alcohol in your margarita you can just increase the amount of rhubarb concentrate or seltzer to make it your own.

Simple Rhubarb Limeade To make a simple rhubarb limeade that will please kids and adults alike, simply mix equal parts rhubarb concentrate with water and serve over ice.

Rhubarb Seltzer To make a refreshing but less sweet seltzer mix 1 part rhubarb concentrate with 2-3 parts seltzer (we make our own in our SodaStream).  Serve over ice with a sliced lime.

Rhubarb Spritzer For a nice wine spritzer, try 4 parts (4 oz) chilled white wine, 1 part (1 oz) rhubarb concentrate, and 1 part (1 oz) seltzer.  Serve over ice with a slice of lime. 

Rhubarbarita For a fun twist on the traditional margarita, mix about 3 shots (4.5 oz) rhubarb concentrate with 1 shot tequila (1.5 oz) and one-half shot Triple Sec or Gran Gala (a little less than 1 ounce).  Shake with ice, pour into your glass, then add a splash of seltzer to taste. Can also be scaled up to make pitchers!

Carrie Williams Howe is the Executive Director of an educational nonprofit by day, and parent and aspiring homesteader by night and on weekends. She lives in Williston, Vermont, with her husband, two young children, and a rambunctious border collie. Carrie has a PhD in educational leadership and is passionate about being an authentic, participatory leader in various settings. She is a contributing editor at Parent Co Magazine. Connect with Carrie on The Happy Hive Facebook page. Read all of Carrie’s MOTHER EARTH NEWS posts here.


All MOTHER EARTH NEWS community bloggers have agreed to follow our Blogging Guidelines, and they are responsible for the accuracy of their posts. To learn more about the author of this post, click on their byline link at the top of the page.

Stockpiling for Sustainability

stockpile

Above: A partial view of our stockpile

I used to think that stockpiles were mostly a part of Doomsday Prepping, but our stockpile has helped to tide us over through many a tough time, sometimes dwindling to a very thin remainder as we ate our way through it. 

Our stockpile was not created deliberately, it just grew; most often, my husband would see something on sale, and buy several items instead of just one for immediate use. There's often something at a good price that can be stored for a long time – canned vegetables, pasta, rice, beans and barley, non-perishables such as shampoo and toilet paper. I must admit that back then, I felt a little pang in my heart whenever I saw the grocery bill, thinking to myself that here are things we could do without, taking up storage space. Time proved that I was wrong.

I was always of the philosophy that buying something you didn't plan to buy was still spending money, even if the price is very good. It is indeed a fine line between stockpiling wisely and becoming a pack rat. Unhealthy foods, snacks loaded with salt and sugar, are never a good deal even if they happen to be very cheap. And luxury items won't help you stretch your budget, no matter how you look at it.

Yes, it's true that we bought more than we needed at the moment, but back then, we could spare the extra cash. I was very glad we did when time came to cutting back costs as much as we could. Our stockpile proved to be a major grocery budget stretcher.

We always keep an eye on those non-quickly-perishables at good prices, and buy some for immediate use, and some for stockpiling. Some of that stuff can last for years. Just one caveat: each year before Pesach, we need to get rid of the items that are not kosher for Pesach. Last year, it meant giving away a pile of pasta.

There is really something very comforting about knowing that you have a lot of food in your house, food that can tide your family over in tough times. Having a stockpile may also reduce the frequency of shopping, which saves money and time.

So where do you store your stockpile? Many people, myself included, have a problem with storage space. I barely have room for the bare essentials in my kitchen, let alone keeping a stockpile. Personally, we keep our stockpile in a cabinet in the guest room. An unorthodox solution, but it will have to do until we have a nice big kitchen with lots of cabinets.

This post was an excerpt from my book, The Practical Homemaker's Companion.

Anna Twitto’s academic background in nutrition made her care deeply about real food and seek ways to obtain it. Anna and her husband live on a plot of land in Israel. They aim to grow and raise a significant part of their food by maintaining a vegetable garden, keeping a flock of backyard chickens and foraging. Anna's books are on her Amazon.com Author Page. Connect with Anna on Facebook and read more about her current projects on her blog. Read all Anna's Mother Earth News posts here


All MOTHER EARTH NEWS community bloggers have agreed to follow our Blogging Guidelines, and they are responsible for the accuracy of their posts. To learn more about the author of this post, click on their byline link at the top of the page.

I Want Cheese and I Want It Now!

11889657_1625399724408012_3255297014611514803_n

We usually start our cheese making workshops, here at our farm The Mushroom Hut @ Fox Farms/Micro Dairy, in Summer. Ours is a goat dairy. We have pure Saanen, Nubian and a mix of Saanen/Nubian. The Saanen gives volume where the Nubian gives high fat content and the Saanen/Nubian mix gives the best of both worlds!

Waiting for the Milk:

Breeding season, for us, starts anywhere between October and December. We decide when we want the goats to kid (the does and kids do better when it starts getting warmer) usually the last of April. We take that date and count backwards 145-155 days (approx. gestation period) to see when we want to breed the goats. This also depends on estrus of the goats. If they have gone past their estrus cycle we will have to wait another cycle (approx. 21-28 days).
We do not take the kids away from their mothers. We leave them until they have been weaned. We do take any excess milk they have during this time.

Now...it's time for Cheesemaking:

Milking and cheesemaking starts in earnest for us around the last of May to the first of June. In years past we have only milked by hand. As arthritis sets in, we are now using a milking machine. We can conduct workshops on making different types of cheeses but are only licensed to make/sell aged cheeses. We do have a "farm kitchen" where the milk and cheese are processed. The milk goes directly from the milking parlor to the farm kitchen. You do not want to leave your milk out for too long before processing or refrigeration. This can cause "off" flavors in your product.

Some of the cheeses we make here are our Homebrew Cheddar, Chived Cheddar and Hopping and Wining Tomme. The Hopping Tomme and Homebrew Cheddar are brine washed in a beer made from our hops to reduce mold growth. The Wining Tomme is brine washed in wine made here from Wineberries. After developing a hard rind (about 3 days of air drying) we use beeswax (wax we save from our honey harvest) to coat. We make a Chevre that we use in our poundcakes. One of the most simple and versatile cheeses we show people how to make is our Queso Blanco...or vinegar cheese. You can start this in the morning and have it for your evening meal! This cheese doesn't require rennet or culture.

Items Needed:

Stainless Steel pot (that will hold at least 1 gal.) or enamel. Never use aluminum with milk.
Thick cheesecloth (or muslin),
ladle,
thermometer (candy or digital) and colander (preferably stainless).

Note: I use "flour sack" towels you can get from Wal-Mart instead of cheesecloth.

This cheese has a variety of uses. It does not melt but can be baked, deep-fried, used in stir-fries, sauces and used as a substitute for tofu. It has a similar texture to Mozzarella. It is also referred to as Paneer/Panir. Depending on the fat content of the milk.

Yield: 1 1/2-2 lbs.

Ingredients

1 gal. (whole milk)
1/4 cup vinegar (either kind, you can also substitute lemon juice)
Kosher salt as desired

Directions:

1. In a large (stainless steel or enamel) pot, directly heat at med./high heat the milk to 185-190 degrees. Keep stirring during this time trying to keep from scorching the milk.

2. Using a thermometer (you can use a candy or digital thermometer) keep a watch on the temp. When you get to 190 slowly add the vinegar, a little at a time, until you see the curds and whey begin to seperate. You can go up to 200 degrees but, do NOT boil.

3. When the curds have settled, ladle into a colander lined with cheesecloth.

4. Tie the corners, when cool enough to handle, into a knot and hang the bag somewhere it can drain (possibly over the sink) for several hours or until the texture suits you.

5. Remove the cheese from the cheesecloth and eat fresh or prepare for later use. The cheese can now be crumbled (add salt and/or herbs if desired) and used like feta or can be molded (also with herbs or berries if you wish). This cheese can be frozen or stored in the refrigerator for up to 2 weeks.

NOTE: This cheese is great to cut up in small chunks and put inside homemade hush puppies. You can also batter these then deep fry. This cheese can be soaked in wine, fruit juice or other to take on different flavors for dessert!

IMG2368 800x600

Making and Selling Cheeses from Your Homestead/Farm:

You will need a milking parlor. Specification for us, North Carolina, is sloping floor with drain and washable walls and stanchion/stand. We also had to have a double sink with a designated side for hand-washing (with sign). You need warm water which we were able to provide with a tankless water heater that heats as needed or "on demand". Milk needs to be milked into stainless steel containers/pails. The milk needs to be taken directly to the "cheese kitchen" or designated area for processing the milk. Milk needs to be strained immediately and processed or refrigerated. The state Food Inspector will have to inspect and approve your set-up before you can begin selling your product.

If the cheeses made are for you and your family there is no limit to the varieties you can make and enjoy. On the other hand if the product is to be sold there are guidelines for each state. You can contact your local Cooperative Extension Agency for help or more info. You can also go directly to your Dept. of Agriculture and speak with one of the Food Inspectors.

We are a micro-dairy and do not have a commercial pasteurizer so we must use raw milk in our cheeses. If using raw milk, NC regulations require us to "age" our cheeses 60 days before selling. Batches of our milk must be sent for testing but our state provides the sampling containers, labels and test for free!

In order to "age" cheese you need a constant temperature (for our cheeses we need 55-60 degrees Fahrenheit) and we don't have a cheese cave. We got permission to use a small "dorm" refrigerator that we keep at the temp we need. These cheeses must be turned every day.
IMG2404 800x600

If you are wanting to make different kinds of cheeses and can source pasteurized milk from a licensed dairy that is another option.

Susan Tipton-Fox continues the farming and preserving practices that have been passed down to her by her family. She presents on-farm workshops in Yancey County, North Carolina, and growing her on-farm agritourism by promoting "workshop stays" on the farm (extending the farm experience). Read all of Susan's MOTHER EARTH NEWS posts here.


All MOTHER EARTH NEWS community bloggers have agreed to follow our Blogging Guidelines, and they are responsible for the accuracy of their posts. To learn more about the author of this post, click on their byline link at the top of the page.

Funk-Busting Tomatillo Salsa

Tomatillo Salsa 20170331 550px

Man...I have been in a funk...an “I don’t want to see or talk to anyone” kind of funk...the when-you-are-really-busy-but-do-not-seem-to-get-anything-done type of funk. I have not posted anything since November, not because I do not have anything to write about rather because I have just been in a funk. Then it hit me, November...what happened in November? While there were a few minor disasters over the Holidays, they were not significant enough to cause this funk. Aaaahh, I am suffering from PESD, Post-Election Stress Disorder. It is apparently a real thing that broke up families over the holidays. While I did not have a severe case of it, I was suffering from some sort of post-election malaise…a funk, if you will. I needed to get my groove back.

I was feeling better in early April as we prepared to celebrate my birthday and my wife’s birthday when, BAM, my dad had a stroke and a dear friend that had been ill for a long time passed away. I could feel the funk coming back. My dad should make a full recovery and my dear friend, a second mom to me, always enjoyed seeing the pictures of our garden on Facebook. She was never in a funk even as she died. So it was time to put this funk behind me and get moving.

As it turns out, good food can help you out of a funk, and good food made from stuff in your garden is even better funk-busting medicine.

One early afternoon after a long morning of working in the garden, I took a break and wanted a snack. One of my favorite things to do is make a dip by mixing salsa with yogurt and dig in with some chips. In our vast collection of canned goods, I came across a pint of tomatillo salsa I had made last summer. The tomatillo was one of last year’s gardening experiments. It looks like a green tomato covered with a papery husk and is a mainstay of Mexican cooking, and the key component to the classic salsa verde (if you use green tomatoes, you are just a poser). While readily available in the Mexican markets in town, I wanted to try growing it in our garden. I ended up with about three pounds of golf ball sized, beautiful green, tart fruit from a containerized plant that later succumbed to the mid-summer heat as it sat on the back porch.

Tomatillo Plant in Bloom

I used a recipe from the Ball Complete Book of Home Preserving as a template for this Funk-Busting Salsa Verde.

Funk-Busting Salsa Verde

Since everything will go into a food processor, the ingredients only need to be roughly chopped. And if you don’t have Shishito peppers (which are a mild pepper that I heard about and started growing last year), use any milder pepper, or just add one more jalapeno.

Ingredients:

4 cups tomatillos, husk removed and the sticky film washed off, roughly chopped
½ large red onion, roughly chopped
2 red jalapeno peppers, roughly chopped
4 Shishito peppers, roughly chopped
5 cloves of garlic, roughly chopped
4 tbsp fresh lime juice
½ cup white vinegar
5 tbsp cilantro, roughly chopped

Directions

1. Add all of the ingredients to a food processor and blitz until it is the texture you want.

2. Transfer to a pot and bring to a boil on medium-high heat.

3. Once boiling reduce heat and gently boil for 10 minutes.

4. Appropriately fill sanitized jars and seal with sanitized lids and rings.

5. Process in boiling water bath for 15 minutes or get a bag of chips and chow down.

Yield: 2 pints.

After canning and sitting for 8 months, the flavors had melded perfectly resulting in a tangy, spicy sweet salsa with a hint of smokiness from an unknown source. So, I think that letting this sit for at least a few hours will only improve the flavor. Once mixed with the yogurt, it was a Texas mid-day snack worthy of a blog post and suitable for any time of the day or for a party.

This treat, put up last summer, and eaten with homemade corn tortilla chips helped me with my funk. It got me excited to get back out in the garden, try growing some new things, try some new techniques and enjoy the fruits and vegetables of our labor. So if you find yourself feeling blue or in a bit of a funk, scrounge up a few tomatillos, or cheat with a few green tomatoes, and whip up a batch of Funk Busting Salsa Verde. Vive la France!

Resource:  Kingry, Judi, and Lauren Devine. The Ball Complete Book Of Home Preserving. Toronto: Robert Rose, Inc, 2006.

Photos by Jennifer Hudson 

Ed Hudson is a biochemist for NASA in Houston. His free time is filled with gardening and an ongoing list of Food Preservation Projects with his lovely wife, Jennifer. You can read more MOTHER EARTH NEWS posts from Ed here and contact him via email at hudsonfarmtx@gmail.comHe is always looking for comments, new ideas and suggestions.


All MOTHER EARTH NEWS community bloggers have agreed to follow our Blogging Guidelines, and they are responsible for the accuracy of their posts. To learn more about the author of this post, click on their byline link at the top of the page.

Harvesting and Using Carob

As much as I love chocolate brownies, the carob version is a nice, healthy alternative which exercises our skills of foraging and utilizing wild-growing foods. The pods of the carob tree are rich in minerals and vitamins, and can be utilized to make tasty, naturally-sweet powder that is often used as a cocoa/chocolate substitute. As a bonus, unlike cocoa, carob is naturally sweet, so when using it I can cut back on added sugar.

Carob trees grow all over Israel (and in similar climates), and the dark brown pods can be picked in the summer. They keep extremely well, so you can pick a big bunch and then process it at your convenience. Make sure the pods you pick are ripe. They are supposed to look and feel dry and to come off easily from the tree. Choose the biggest, shiniest, healthiest-looking pods.

Wash the pods and boil them for around 30 minutes to soften them. This way they will be easier to de-seed. Cut them lengthwise with a sharp knife, remove the seeds, break into pieces and place on a cookie sheet. Dry in the oven on low heat, or in the sun. The pod pieces should be really crisp, but not burned.

Throw your dried carob pieces into the food processor. Once you have mostly powder, sift to remove any chunks that are left, then return them into the food processor and repeat.

carob powder

Above: carob powder in process of making. Note it's still a little chunky. 

Once you have your carob powder, you can proceed to making the brownies. That’s the easiest part by far!

Carob Brownies

Ingredients

3 eggs (we prefer to use our own, of course)
½ cup natural sweetener (we use honey or organic maple syrup)
¾ cup cold pressed coconut oil
½ cup carob powder
1\2 cup flour (if you wish to avoid gluten, any kind of gluten-free flour will work perfectly well)
a pinch of baking powder
optional: some natural vanilla extract to taste

Directions

1. Mix well and spread over a baking-paper lined tray.

2. Bake for 20-25 minutes at medium heat, checking often (don’t overdo – they are supposed to remain a little moist inside).

3. Cut into squares while brownies are still hot, and allow them to set before removing from baking tray. Store in an airtight jar for a week or indefinitely in the freezer.

carobbrownies

Carob brownies, cut into squares while still hot. 

Anna Twitto’s academic background in nutrition made her care deeply about real food and seek ways to obtain it. Anna and her husband live on a plot of land in Israel. They aim to grow and raise a significant part of their food by maintaining a vegetable garden, keeping a flock of backyard chickens and foraging. Anna's books are on her Amazon.com Author Page. Connect with Anna on Facebook and read more about her current projects on her blog. Read all Anna's Mother Earth News posts here


All MOTHER EARTH NEWS community bloggers have agreed to follow our Blogging Guidelines, and they are responsible for the accuracy of their posts. To learn more about the author of this post, click on their byline link at the top of the page.