DIY





How to Cure Olives

Learn how to cure olives the Greek way, including materials, photographs, instructions, processing, cooking and food ideas.

| January/February 1976

One of the first things I noticed when I moved into my apartment here in Chula Vista, California — a few miles south of San Diego — was the fine old olive trees growing among the landscaped shrubbery and lawns of the neighborhood.

"They're Mission olives," an old-time resident of the city told me, "refugees from one of the many groves in this area that have been ripped up and replaced by suburban developments."

Olive trees, however — which have a very long life — don't stop producing fruit just because they've become mere decorations. Literally tons of olives go to waste in southern California every year! Part of the crop, of course, is consumed by starlings, one of the few birds that will eat the bitter berries. The lush oval fruit also makes super ammunition for the slingshot set (the ripe ones find their target with a satisfying purple splat).

Few people try to harvest the olives, because they have a dreadful taste fresh off the tree and must be processed in one of several complicated ways. So most people just rake them up and throw them away then pick up a can of the "ready-made" fruit at the supermarket.



Because I'm a frustrated farmer who wants to produce something other than crab grass in his mini-yard, I decided to try harvesting the luscious black olives hanging heavy from the dozen or so trees near my apartment.

A little research into the art and science of preserving olives, however, produced one clear message: Forget it! The juicy black ones you buy in a can at the supermarket, I learned, started their processing before they were ripe. And, anyway, I didn't have room in my pad for all the necessary crocks and vats.

Lilia
1/5/2011 9:53:28 PM

I live in Chula Vista too, zc 91914, Yes there are many olive trees, however are fruitless. Those olive trees are ornamental. Neither the city or HOA will deal with the work that the olives will represent. stains, having to spray the trees, etc.


Lilia
1/5/2011 9:48:24 PM

I live in Chula Vista too, zc 91914, Yes there are many olive trees, however are fruitless. Those olive trees are ornamental. Neither the city or HOA will deal with the work that the olives will represent. stains, having to spray the trees, etc.


Audra
12/12/2010 10:47:30 PM

http://www.articledashboard.com/Article/Cure-and-Preserve-Your-Own-Olives/762867 I would like to find one now that doesn't require vinegar....but I will do it this way first!







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