Plant a Pollinator-Friendly Garden

Planting a pollinator-friendly garden is a win-win: Provide food and habitat for beneficial insects and boost yields in your food crops.

October/November 2014

By Shelley Stonebrook


Many of the food crops you grow in your garden rely on pollinators — such as bees, wasps, butterflies, beetles and even hummingbirds — to produce fruits. Creating a pollinator-friendly garden is a win-win: You’ll provide much-needed food and habitat for beneficial insects and, in turn, boost yields in your food crops because you’re plants will be well-pollinated. Another added bonus: Such a garden, with its diversity of blooms, will be a stunning visual display.

Planting a pollinator-friendly garden is perhaps more crucial now than ever. Pollinators are in trouble. Their numbers have been steadily declining in recent years, in large part due to the ubiquitous use of potent pesticides. (Read more about neonicotinoids, a particular class of pesticides killing bees and other pollinators.) Pollinators need save havens free of chemicals. Follow the wealth of tips in these resources, and you’ll be on your way to creating such a haven in your own backyard.