DIY







Top Tips for Great Fall Gardens

Here’s everything you need to know to grow crisp, delicious broccoli, carrots, spinach and more.

| August/September 2011

  • Fall Garden With Cold Frame And Vegetables
    Lacinato kale (left) and lettuces flourish in autumn’s cooler temperatures. If covered, they can last into winter and sometimes come back in spring.
    PHOTO: BARBARA DAMROSCH
  • Fall Gardens With Sunflowers And Kale
    Lacinato kale and sunflowers thrive in the cooler fall temperatures.
    BARBARA DAMROSCH
  • Fall Garden Carrots
    Carrots make a sweet, crunchy addition to your fall garden crops.
    BARBARA DAMROSCH
  • Fall Garden Radishes
    Plant radishes every 30 days until fall’s first killing frost ends their season.
    BARBARA DAMROSCH
  • Fall Garden With Rows Of Lettuce
    Plant lettuces for fresh greens in your fall garden.
    LEE REICH
  • Fall Garden With Cover Crops
    Plant cover crops such as oats, winter wheat or rye in any empty beds to overwinter. In spring, till them under or chop them in using a heavy hoe. 
    LEE REICH
  • Seed Saving Guide
    Gardeners and farmers: Request your free guide to saving seeds.
    ORGANIC SEED ALLIANCE
  • Lettuce In A Cold Frame
    Grow lettuces deep into winter by planting in a cold frame. Black-painted bottles of water tucked inside will store solar heat.
    DAVID LIEBMAN
  • People Working In The Garden
    Even working in the fall garden is more pleasant, now that summer’s intense heat and humidity have gone by.
    BARBARA DAMROSCH

  • Fall Garden With Cold Frame And Vegetables
  • Fall Gardens With Sunflowers And Kale
  • Fall Garden Carrots
  • Fall Garden Radishes
  • Fall Garden With Rows Of Lettuce
  • Fall Garden With Cover Crops
  • Seed Saving Guide
  • Lettuce In A Cold Frame
  • People Working In The Garden

With tomatoes, peppers and melons now hitting their late summer stride, it’s easy to forget that autumn and early winter can be as abundant as spring and summer. Those who seize the opportunity for a second season of growth will find the planning and planting well worthwhile.

The steps to a bountiful fall garden are simple. Choose crops suited to fall growing conditions (see the list of crops and recommended varieties at the end of this article). Ensure your chosen site has organically enriched soil and adequate water. And start now. If you don’t have seeds on hand, use our online seed finder.

You can replace spring-planted lettuces, peas and brassicas (broccoli and its relatives) with new plantings that mature in fall. Seeds and transplants will take off quickly in the warm summer soil. They’ll appreciate cooler nights, too.

Look forward to peak flavor and performance for many crops that do not prosper in summer heat. Lower temperatures are ideal for producing crisp lettuces without the bitterness or bolting that can occur in hot weather. Frost-kissed kale, Brussels sprouts and cabbage have a special sweetness. Carrots, beets and turnips also thrive in the fall garden and, after harvest, can be kept in a pantry or root cellar so you can enjoy their goodness well into winter. Collards, mustard and other greens also like cool weather.



Favored Crops for Fall

When deciding what to plant now for fall harvest, gardeners throughout most of the country should think greens and root vegetables, advises John Navazio, a plant-breeding and seed specialist at Washington State University and senior scientist for the Organic Seed Alliance in Port Townsend, Wash., which conducts annual tests of crops and varieties to evaluate their cold hardiness.

Leafy greens (such as lettuces, spinach, arugula, chard and mâche) and root veggies (such as beets, carrots, turnips, radishes and rutabagas) as well as brassicas (including broccoli, cabbage, cauliflower, collards, kale and Chinese cabbage) and peas will all thrive in the cooler weather and shorter days of fall. In many regions, some of these cold-hardy crops will even survive the winter to produce a second harvest in spring. (See “Stretching the Season,” below.)

robert
8/5/2017 1:08:06 PM

I am sharing my experience, We have vegetables and food from the market is not 100% organic food, it is missed with poison liquid as you know the people spray the plants to grow the vegetables and fruits faster, My lab professor referred a guide it helps me to plant and prepare a good organic food for healthy life. Check the guide here >>( http://go2l.ink/plants ) <<. Now my family my relations are using this technique to get quality vegetables and fruits. All the best ...*







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