Delicious Cherry Cake

Reader Contribution by Sue Van Slooten
article image

Nothing says Christmas like this beautiful Cherry Pound Cake. Studded with bright red cherries, it is a delight for the eyes as well as the palate. It’s deliciousness crossed my path not too long ago via Rock Recipes, Barry Parson’s blog out of Newfoundland, Canada. According to Barry, no Newfoundland Christmas table would be complete without it. Newfoundland, as you may know, is the easternmost point of North America, so much so, it has its own time zone, one half hour earlier than the eastern seaboard.The Rock, incidentally, is what the locals call Newfoundland.

This cake makes two generous loaves, but you can use a springform pan or a Bundt/Tube pan as well. I made it in two loaf pans, freezing one for later, and, of course, eating the other. It did not last long. It was very well received by the other half, namely, the hubby. Barry recommends rinsing the cherries first, and I agree. It keeps the batter from turning pink in my opinion. I also cut the sugar slightly, by 1/2 cup. If you want it sweeter, go for it. So, without further delay, here’s the recipe:

Cherry Pound Cake

Ingredients:

  • 1 lb chopped glace cherries with 1/4 cup flour
  • 1 1/2 cups butter
  • 1 1/2 cups sugar
  • 3 eggs
  • 2 tsp. vanilla extract
  • 2 tsp almond extract
  • 3 cups flour
  • 1 1/2 tsp baking powder
  • 1 cup lukewarm, undiluted evaporated milk

Directions

Preheat your oven to 325 F.

1. Rinse the cherries in a colander to remove any syrup they may have been stored in. Pat them dry between layers of paper towels.This step helps prevent the cherries from sinking into the batter as well. Depending on their size, cut them into halves or quarters and set aside for later. They will get tossed in 1/4 cup flour later but not until just before they are folded into the batter.

2. Cream together the butter and sugar well.

3. Add the eggs, one at a time, beating well after each addition until light and fluffy.

4. Beat in the vanilla and almond extracts.

5. Sift together the 3 cups of flour and baking powder,

6. Fold dry ingredients into the creamed mixture alternately with the warm milk, beginning and ending with the dry ingredients. As a general rule, I add the dry ingredients in three portions and the milk in two portions.

7. Fold the chopped cherries that have been tossed at the last minute in the 1/4 cup flour.

8. Bake in a greased and floured springform pan, tube pan, or two loaf pans, lined with parchment. (Sue’s note: I definitely recommend the parchment in the loaf pans.) Bake for 45-60 minutes, depending on the size of your pans. 

9. Let the cake cool in the pan(s) for ten minutes before turning out onto a wire rack to cool completely.

References:

Parsons, Barry C. “Rock Recipes: Christmas” St. John’s, Newfoundland: Breakwater Books, 2016. Also, www.breakwaterbooks.com. Last accessed December 2, 2019.

Parsons, Barry C. Rock Recipes:www.rockrecipes.com Last accessed December 1, 2019.

You can follow the further adventures of Sue or sign up for a class at her websiteor email.  Read all of Sue’s Mother Earth News blog postshere.

STEAK AND CAKE

Elizabeth Karmel says, let them eat cake … and steak! In this unique cookbook, she shares more than 100 recipes that scream to be made, paired, and eaten with joy. How about a Cowboy Steak with Whiskey Butter followed by a Whiskey Buttermilk Bundt Cake? Or a Porterhouse for Two with Mother’s Freshly Grated Coconut Cake? Or mix and match yourself. Maybe a Classic Key Lime Cheesecake?

Not only will you find some of the best recipes ever for steak (and steakhouse sides and sauces) and those all-butter-eggs-and-sugar cakes, but you will also pick up tips and tricks for choosing and cooking steaks and baking cakes. The result is an instant dinner party, the kind of universally loved meal that makes any and every occasion special. Order from the MOTHER EARTH NEWS Store or by calling 800-234-3368.


All MOTHER EARTH NEWS community bloggers have agreed to follow our Blogging Guidelines, and they are responsible for the accuracy of their posts. To learn more about the author of this post, click on their byline link at the top of the page.