All About Growing Cauliflower

Growing cauliflower requires excellent soil and close attention to planting dates, so that the plants mature in cool weather. But when vigorous cauliflower varieties are planted at the right time, robust cauliflower plants produce excellent crops. This guide includes descriptions of the types of cauliflower and tips for getting a great cauliflower harvest.


| December 20, 2013



Cauliflower Illustration

Grow a fall crop of cauliflower and culinary delights such as oven-roasted cauliflower and creamy cauliflower soup await you.


Illustration by Keith Ward

(For details on growing many other vegetables and fruits, visit our Crop at a Glance collection page.)

The most temperamental member of cabbage family crops, cauliflower grows into a large, broad plant before producing a crisp central head. Growing cauliflower is not recommended in spring unless you live in a climate with consistently cool summers, because temperatures above 80 degrees Fahrenheit during head formation causes the heads to become small and of poor texture.

In most areas cauliflower is best grown as a fall crop, with seeds started indoors in early summer. If you live where winter temperatures stay above 20 degrees, you can grow selected cauliflower varieties through winter for harvest in spring.

Types of Cauliflower

Cauliflower varieties vary in growth rate and color. Almost all common varieties are hybrids.

Early cauliflower varieties such as ‘Snow Crown,’ ‘Denali’ and green-headed ‘Panther’ mature about 70 to 80 days after planting, so they are a good choice for climates where fall weather does not last long. However, the heads of early cauliflower varieties are not as large, dense and sweet as those that mature later.

Main-season cauliflower varieties need more than 80 days after transplanting to mature, but the large heads are worth the wait. In addition to growing cauliflower varieties with white heads such as ‘Candid Charm’ and ‘Skywalker,’ try purple cauliflower such as ‘Graffiti’ or ‘Orange Burst’ orange cauliflower, which has more vitamin A than other types of cauliflower.

robert
8/5/2017 2:29:46 PM

We started gardening and we were gone wrong. We could not figure out why we were not getting the beautiful vegetables we were hoping for. People suggest to spray chemicals for vegetables and fruits but is poison and it is not organic vegetables. My lab professor referred a guide it helps me to grow my gardening as what we like, you can get the guide from here >> ( http://go2l.ink/plants ) <<. I have recommended this system to all of my friends and family. We got good organic natural vegetables and fruits in the next harvest, one of the beautiful products in the market....*






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