10 Things I Wish I’d Known Before Starting a Vegetable Garden


| 2/28/2019 11:03:00 AM


beginner-garden
Photo by Getty Images/AleksandarNakic.

Tip 1: Keep It Light

Plant most vegetables, fruits and herbs somewhere they will receive at least six (preferably eight) hours of direct sunshine daily. Some shading is beneficial in hotter climates.

Some cool-season crops, for instance spinach and cabbage, will grow well in partial shade too.

Tip 2: Convenience

Site your garden somewhere you can see it from the house. That way it won’t accidentally become neglected, as you can see what needs doing, when it needs doing.

Make watering faster and easier by growing your garden close to a water source, or install water barrels if allowed in your area.



Tip 3: Enrich Soil

Enrich your soil with regular additions of organic matter such as garden compost and manure. Manure must be composted for at least six months before using because fresh manure contains weed seeds, may harbor disease, and can negatively affect plants due to its very high nitrogen content.

PatsyMac
6/7/2019 11:27:56 AM

For Jamoke: Contact your county Extension Office for information specific to your area. Extension Agents and Volunteer Master Gardeners are great sources for advice and problem solving. For Ohio, check here: https://extension.osu.edu/ (Please excuse if this is a repeat)


PatsyMac
6/7/2019 11:27:47 AM

For Jamoke: Contact your county Extension Office for information specific to your area. Extension Agents and Volunteer Master Gardeners are great sources for advice and problem solving. For Ohio, check here: https://extension.osu.edu/


Jamoke
4/20/2019 10:27:22 AM

I finally put in a raised garden after years of dealing with weeds that consumed most of my free time. But just last season I found wire worms in my sweet potato bed, and someone told me to check my regular potato beds by baiting them with old potatoes. Well I found that those beds have them also, but the crazy thing is nobody knows how to get rid of them without using something that will poison me if I use it. I wrote to the Ohio Agriculture agency, but after 10 days and no response I guess I try someplace different. Has anybody ever had these little pests in their garden? and if so how did you get rid of them? Someone told me to just get rid of the soil and put new stuff in. But I'm 62 with a bad back and that's why I put in the raised beds, so having to shovel out(beds are 4' wide by 10'long and 2' deep)that much soil and then wheel barrow it up a slope to dump it, that's not happening. So I'm really hoping that someone has an answer for me, thanks a million for everyone's time.






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