What to Do with Windfall Apples


| 7/29/2008 10:27:09 AM


Windfall Apples


Twice a day, I take my bucket out to the apple trees and pick up fallen fruit. The hard green ones under the fall-maturing ‘Liberty’ and ‘Enterprise’ go straight to the compost pile, but many of the apples beneath the early-bearing ‘Williams Pride’ are ripe enough to eat.

The tree has its reasons for shedding this "early windfall" crop. Some of the apples have strange puckers, others show ominous black patches, and many suffer cuts and bruises when they fall to the ground. I shake off the ants and pick them up. If you want to grow high-quality apples organically, gathering up fallen fruit is mandatory. Doing it daily prevents problems with a dozen widespread insects and diseases — and mighty hordes of irritable yellow jackets, too.

After sorting, I have about 10 pounds of apples a day in need of attention. I don’t want to invest much time and energy in them, because there are much better apples to come. But it goes against my nature to waste something that’s perfectly usable. After doing some research and trying various options, here’s what’s working for me.

 Pink Juice



The apple industry funds fabulous research into every imaginable nutritional benefit of apples. Eating them fresh and whole is best, but a cloudy pink juice made from whole apples, with skins intact, contains four times as many beneficial nutrients as clear, pressed juice. It’s fast to make, too. Wash the apples, cut away obvious bad parts, and cut them in halves or quarters. Place in a large pot with an inch or two of water. Bring to a boil, cover, and cook about 20 minutes. Mash with a potato masher or big spoon, and then dump the pulp into a large colander lined with a piece of lightweight cloth such as cotton sheeting or cheesecloth, placed over a deep pot. After it has drained for an hour or so, squeeze the pulp a few times to get as much cloudy juice as you can, because the cloudier the juice, the greater its fiber, heart-healthy flavonoids and antioxidants to charge up your immune system.

kathy
10/8/2013 1:58:52 PM

hi, the pink juice sounds fantastic. I know fresh is best but how do you store this long term..can it...freeze it? how long will it last if fridge? one more question.. how many apples do you throw in the pot at one time?


kathy
10/8/2013 1:58:49 PM

hi, the pink juice sounds fantastic. I know fresh is best but how do you store this long term..can it...freeze it? how long will it last if fridge? one more question.. how many apples do you throw in the pot at one time?


kathy
10/8/2013 1:58:47 PM

hi, the pink juice sounds fantastic. I know fresh is best but how do you store this long term..can it...freeze it? how long will it last if fridge? one more question.. how many apples do you throw in the pot at one time?




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