How to Wage War on Worms and Coccidia in Goats


| 11/14/2014 8:41:00 AM


Tags: worms, dairy goats, goats, Florida, Julia Shewchuk,

Do you know that with each beautiful summer rain millions of little worm eggs are being shed by the worms inside your goats to live in your pastures? Do you know that internal parasites cause more goats to die than the total of the next three leading causes of goat deaths combined? Do you want to know how to win the war on worms? So do I and every other goat farmer and producer on this earth.

Many of my fellow goat friends have lost goats this year due to worms, and these people were not just goat newbies. This spring and summer were wet in the south-east and it made living easy, most of all for the worms and coccidia bacteria. These little critters just love the heat, humidity and the rains, in fact it takes rain for them to hatch and to infect your livestock.

One Barber pole worm alone can lay between 1,000 and 6,000 eggs per day. And of course a goat will not just have one worm. Multiply this by the number of goats you have and realize how many worm eggs you may have on your pastures and pens. Tape worms and other stomach worms don’t cause the deaths that the Barber pole worm does, but they cause diarrhea, unthriftiness and a suppressed immune system.

Coccidia are bacteria that take advantage of a suppressed immune system and cause diarrhea, dehydration and death if not treated quickly. Coccidiosis often piggy-backs on goats having a suppressed immune system from being wormy and take them downhill even faster.

12 Tips to Prevent Worms and Coccidia in Goats

My little blog post is way too short to give you all the answers and information you need to keep your goat herd healthy, but I wrote down 12 tips for you based on our experience that can give you a start and a chance to stay on top of the worms and coccidia.

allison
11/19/2014 10:29:28 AM

Hello, thank you for all this information. I would like to point out that Cocci and Coccidia are not the same thing. "Cocci" refers to any round or oval shaped bacteria. Coccidia is a single celled parasite. Coccidia is a protozoa not a bacteria. There may be some confusion since you can find both cocci and coccidia on fecal exams and since either can cause diarrhea. A finding of abundant cocci (along with rods and spirochete the other two types of bacteria) on a fecal (usually a direct exam not a float) will indicated either a primary or secondary bacterial infection of the lower GI. There will always be cocci and rods present in a fecal exam, one becomes concerned when there is an over growth (no bacteria is also an issue). A finding of coccidia on a fecal exam indicates the presence of the protozoan parasite. Even if only one coccidia is identified on a fecal the animal should be treated. Also since neither bacteria or protozoa reproduce via eggs (they both divide) you do not look for "cocci eggs" on a fecal what you are actually identifying are the protozoa.


allison
11/19/2014 10:28:28 AM

Hello, thank you for all this information. I would like to point out that Cocci and Coccidia are not the same thing. "Cocci" refers to any round or oval shaped bacteria. Coccidia is a single celled parasite. Coccidia is a protozoa not a bacteria. There may be some confusion since you can find both cocci and coccidia on fecal exams and since either can cause diarrhea. A finding of abundant cocci (along with rods and spirochete the other two types of bacteria) on a fecal (usually a direct exam not a float) will indicated either a primary or secondary bacterial infection of the lower GI. There will always be cocci and rods present in a fecal exam, one becomes concerned when there is an over growth (no bacteria is also an issue). A finding of coccidia on a fecal exam indicates the presence of the protozoan parasite. Even if only one coccidia is identified on a fecal the animal should be treated. Also since neither bacteria or protozoa reproduce via eggs (they both divide) you do not look for "cocci eggs" on a fecal what you are actually identifying are the protozoa.





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