Profit From a Home Sewing Business

Profit from a home sewing business, work 25 hours a week at your sewing machine as a seamstress and make $300 a month while keeping track of the kids at the same time.


| November/December 1977



Chart: A list of home sewing business supplies.

Chart: A list of home sewing business supplies.


By the MOTHER EARTH NEWS staff

Learn how to run your own home sewing business from the comfort of your homestead.

Profit From a Home Sewing Business

Have you ever wished you could find a home business that requires only a modest initial investment, entails little or no overhead, and propagates itself entirely by word of mouth? If so, maybe you should do what I did: Start a home sewing business.

A few years ago — when I began to look around for ways to fortify my then-sagging bank account — I decided that I simply would not take a job outside my home. I had a four-year-old daughter, and I didn't want to farm her out to a baby-sitter during the day while I faced the "work world". After investigating several alternatives, I finally decided to set up my own home sewing and custom dressmaking business.

Mind you, at the time I was hardly what you could call an experienced seamstress. (I had taught myself to sew over a three-year period, progressing from diapershirts, to dresses for myself, to jackets for my husband.) My experience was — in a word — limited . . . but I figured that if I proceeded slowly, cut carefully, and followed the pattern instructions religiously, I could convince paying customers that I knew what I was doing. So I forged ahead.

Early Business Preparations

As I began to plan my "sew for dough" venture, I took inventory of my tools and supplies to see if I had everything I'd need to do any and all kinds of sewing . . . and right away, I made my first mistake: I bought a very expensive sewing machine with a multitude of gadgets and dials. (Little did I know then that I would never be called upon to use all those fancy accessories. A simple machine with just the basic stitches — straight, stretch, and zigzag — and a buttonhole-maker would have served my purposes well. and saved me a big chunk of money.)

Fortunately, we had a spare bedroom in our house and I was able to appropriate it for my "sewing headquarters". (Although it's not essential that you have a separate room for sewing, it certainly is a convenience. Customers feel much more comfortable dressing and undressing in a part of the house that's away from the family traffic pattern.) An old bookcase became my pattern file, and my husband installed long shelves on one wall to take care of fabric storage. (A fabric storage area is essential, since some customers bring in as many as 10 or 12 patterns and fabrics at one time.)

sarah
9/25/2017 12:27:27 PM

this helped alot! where do you buy your sewing supplies? material ect.?


rebeccad1307
9/25/2017 12:27:25 PM

this helped alot thanks! where do you buy your sewing supplies? material ect.?


julie
5/25/2016 11:59:44 PM

This is a great article. It's something I've always thought about doing, but not sure I can handle it.


anonymous
4/3/2013 3:58:18 PM

Dear Mother, You post many articles, such as this one, that are thirty years old or more. If you are going to post an old article why don't you bring it up to date with current ideas?






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