Attic Renovation

Check out this attic renovation guide that’ll give you information on how to figure out how to conduct an inspection of structure, access, and space.


  • 103-080-01i6
    The parts of an attic.
    ILLUSTRATION: MOTHER EARTH NEWS STAFF
  • 103-080-01i4
    Venting techniques for attic renovation 2.
    MOTHER EARTH NEWS STAFF
  • 103-080-01i3
    Venting techniques for attic renovation 1.
    MOTHER EARTH NEWS STAFF
  • 103-080-01i1
    Trusses versus conventional rafters.
    MOTHER EARTH NEWS STAFF
  • 103-080-01i5
    Scabbing on to existing joints.
    MOTHER EARTH NEWS STAFF
  • 103-080-01tab
    Maximum length Eastern spruce joists. Maximum girder span Eastern spruce joists.
    MOTHER EARTH NEWS STAFF

  • 103-080-01i6
  • 103-080-01i4
  • 103-080-01i3
  • 103-080-01i1
  • 103-080-01i5
  • 103-080-01tab

Figure out if your attic is ready for upward mobility with an attic renovation. 

A Guide to Attic Renovation

Attics are special. Most of us who grew up in houses with attics tend to retain a fondness for the space. For children, the attic is a place of mystery and intrigue—a little scary but just close enough for comfort to the familiar bedrooms below. Even 20 or 30 years later, the attic probably keeps some of its allure, at least for the romantics among us.

That fondness can take on new dimensions when a family starts having serious growing pains. Under the pitch of the roof, you could close in a bedroom—small, but fine for a youngster—and add desperately needed living space.

As Simple as It Sounds?

Attic conversion is an appealing fantasy. The roof and basic framework for a new room are already in place, so it should be less costly and easier to finish an attic than to add a wing to the house. Yet these advantages can prove to be restrictions unless the original builder planned for later conversion of the attic.



Just to name a few obvious concerns, the attic's floor may not be structurally up to its new job, there may not be enough headroom, and there's probably no electrical service. In most cases, you can overcome these and other deficiencies. The question you need to answer is whether it might be easier (and less expensive) to add to the ground floor instead.

To make that decision, you have to do a fairly detailed attic survey and carefully analyze the problems you might run into.

liam
4/20/2007 11:16:49 AM

This is a great article. Thanks. LIAM




Subscribe Today - Pay Now & Save 64% Off the Cover Price

50 Years of Money-Saving Tips!

Mother Earth NewsAt MOTHER EARTH NEWS for 50 years and counting, we are dedicated to conserving our planet's natural resources while helping you conserve your financial resources. You'll find tips for slashing heating bills, growing fresh, natural produce at home, and more. That's why we want you to save money and trees by subscribing through our earth-friendly automatic renewal savings plan. By paying with a credit card, you save an additional $5 and get 6 issues of MOTHER EARTH NEWS for only $12.95 (USA only).

You may also use the Bill Me option and pay $17.95 for 6 issues.

Canadian Subscribers - Click Here
International Subscribers - Click Here
Canadian subscriptions: 1 year (includes postage & GST).


Facebook Pinterest Instagram YouTube Twitter flipboard

Free Product Information Classifieds Newsletters