• FERMENT

    In this extensive collection, fermentation pioneer Holly Davis shares more than 120 recipes for familiar (and lesser-known) cultured foods, including yogurt, pickles, kimchi, umeboshi, scrumpy, and more. This inspiring resource contains more than 100 photographs, plus plenty of helpful how-tos and informational charts offering guidance on incorporating fermented ingredients into the diet.

    Item: 9408
  • Miso, Tempeh, Natto & Other Tasty Ferments: A Step-by-Step Guide to Fermenting Grains and Beans

    This in-depth handbook offers accessible, step-by-step techniques for fermenting beans and grains in the home kitchen. The authors expand beyond the basic components of traditionally Asian protein-rich ferments to include not only soybeans and wheat, but also chickpeas, black-eyed peas, lentils, barley, sorghum, millet, quinoa, and oats. Their ferments feature creative combinations such as ancient grains tempeh, hazelnut-cocoa nib tempeh, millet koji, sea island red pea miso, and heirloom cranberry bean miso. Once the ferments are mastered, there are more than 50 additional recipes for using them in condiments, dishes, and desserts (including natto polenta, Thai marinated tempeh, and chocolate miso babka).

    Item: 9441
  • EASY BREAD: 100 NO-KNEAD RECIPES

    Easy Bread will change the way you think about baking bread. Skip the traditional rounds of kneading and rising. With dough always ready to go, you'll be serving up glorious, fresh-baked breads in no time! Award-winning cookbook author Judith Fertig shares her expertise with a simplified, step-by-step technique and clear, detailed recipes easy enough for even beginning bread bakers. Start with a simple French loaf or pizza dough and quickly advance to filled breads, bagels and flaky buttery croissants. Prepare delicious bread toppings and fillings, like artisan butter, cinnamon sugar and caramelized onions, ready for whenever a craving for sweet or savory strikes.

    Item: 11211
  • RESTORING HERITAGE GRAINS

    Could heritage grains, and the ancient ways they were grown, hold the key to restoring the staff of life to our modern diets? Long considered the Western world’s staple food, modern wheat has been drastically transformed over the past century by the food industry. With these changes, concerns have risen over intolerance and so-called “wheat belly.” What changed? The way that we grow our wheat and the modern varieties have made possible enormous harvests, but with those come steep hidden costs. Large industrial farming, dependent on monocultures and the heavy use of fertilizers and herbicides, have deleterious effects not only on our own health but on our land, water, and environment as a whole. Fortunately, heritage “landrace” wheats—crops that have been selected over generations to be well adapted to their local environments—do not need bio-chemical interventions to grow well and yield bountifully in organic fields. Yet these robust and diverse wheats that nourished our ancestors for generations are nearly extinct today. In Restoring Heritage Grains, author Eli Rogosa invites readers to discover “forgotten” grains: diverse, landrace wheat varieties such as emmer, a strain domesticated in the Fertile Crescent that is perfect for pasta and flatbreads; Rouge de Bordeaux, a French heritage wheat beloved by Europe’s artisan bakers; and delicious einkorn, the most ancient wheat of all, which is drought-resilient and heat-tolerant, and contains more protein and minerals than other grains. These and the many other heritage grains each have a lineage intertwined with that of the human species and can and should be grown once again. Combining the history of grain growing and society, in-depth practical advice on landrace wheat husbandry, wheat folktales and mythology, and recipes for beers, breads, and pastries, Restoring Heritage Grains invites readers to explore a rich history that has been overshadowed by modern industrial wheat. In the end, organically grown, diverse wheat may well be one of the best solutions to hunger, one that will be needed to feed the world’s growing population in the decades to come.

    Item: 7943
  • SANDOR KATZ'S FERMENTATION JOURNEY

    For the past two decades, fermentation expert and bestselling author Sandor Katz has traveled the world, both teaching and learning about the many fascinating and delicious techniques for fermenting foods. Wherever he’s gone, he has gleaned valuable insights into the cultures and traditions of local and indigenous peoples, whether they make familiar ferments like sauerkraut or less common preparations like natto and koji.

    Item: 11213
  • THE NEW WILDCRAFTED CUISINE

    Wild foods are increasingly popular, as evidenced by the number of new books about identifying plants and foraging ingredients, as well as those written by chefs about culinary creations that incorporate wild ingredients. The New Wildcrafted Cuisine, however, goes well beyond both of these genres to deeply explore the flavors of local terroir, combining the research and knowledge of plants and landscape that chefs often lack with the fascinating and innovative techniques of a master food preserver and self-described “culinary alchemist.”

    Item: 7842
  • UPRISINGS

    Uprisings shows how communities can take back their power by reviving local grain production to improve food security, local economies, and the environment.

    Item: 6943
  • WILD FERMENTATION, REVISED

    Since its publication in 2003, and aided by Katz’s engaging and fervent workshop presentations, Wild Fermentation has inspired people to turn their kitchens into food labs: fermenting vegetables into sauerkraut, milk into cheese or yogurt, grains into sourdough bread, and much more. This updated and revised edition, now with full-color photos throughout, is sure to introduce a whole new generation to the flavors and health benefits of fermented foods. It features many brand-new recipes and updates and refines original recipes, reflecting the author’s ever-deepening knowledge of global food traditions that has influenced four-star chefs and home cooks alike.

    Item: 8036

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