It's not often that someone stumbles into entrepreneurship and ends up reviving a community and starting a national economic-reform movement. But that’s what happened when, in 1983, Judy Wicks founded the White Dog Café on the first floor of her house on a row of Victorian brownstones in West Philadelphia. After helping to save her block from demolition, Judy grew what began as a tiny muffin shop into a 200-seat restaurant—one of the first to feature local, organic, and humane food. The restaurant blossomed into a regional hub for community, and a national powerhouse for modeling socially responsible business.

    Good Morning, Beautiful Business is a memoir about the evolution of an entrepreneur who would not only change her neighborhood, but would also change her world—helping communities far and wide create local living economies that value people and place as much as commerce and that make communities not just interesting and diverse and prosperous, but also resilient.

    Wicks recounts a girlhood coming of age in the sixties, a stint working in an Alaska Eskimo village in the seventies, her experience cofounding the first Free People's store (now well known as Urban Outfitters), her accidental entry into the world of restauranteering, the emergence of the celebrated White Dog Café, and her eventual role as an international leader and speaker in the local-living-economies movement.

    Her memoir traces the roots of her career—exploring what it takes to marry social change and commerce, and do business differently. Passionate, fun, and inspirational, Good Morning, Beautiful Business explores the way women, and men, can follow both mind and heart, do what’s right, and do well by doing good.

    Item: 7633

    Author: Judy Wicks

    Format: Paperback


    With a distinctly modern sensibility, chef Alice Hart revamps traditional vegetarian cooking for how we eat today: clean, but never deprived; thoughtful, but not over complex. In Good Veg, she shares 200 recipes that surprise and thrill through contrasts: hot and cool, crisp and soft, spicy yet herbal. These recipes appeal to the basic desires of everyone’s taste buds. Hart also includes options for vegan, low-sugar, gluten-free, and raw diets. Finally: a pioneering, healthy cookbook, full of recipes for giving pleasure.

    Item: 8173

    Author: Alice Hart

    Format: Paperback


    Novelist and nature writer Richard Horan embarked on an adventure across America to reveal that farming is still the vibrant beating heart of our nation. Horan went from coast to coast, visiting organic family farms and working the harvests of more than a dozen essential or unusual food crops—from Kansas wheat and Michigan wild rice to Maine potatoes, California walnuts, and Cape Cod cranberries—in search of connections with the farmers, the soil, the seasons, and the lifeblood of America. Sparkling with lively prose and a winning blend of profound seriousness and delightful humor, Harvest carries the reader on an eyeopening and transformational journey across the length and breadth of this remarkable land, offering a powerful national portrait of challenge and diligence, and an inspiring message of hope.

    Item: 6436

    Author: Richard Horan



    Gourmet dehydrated meat is the most popular meat snack today. It’s low in fat and calories and high in protein, making it a favorite among hikers, hunters, bikers, skiers, and those on the go. Make beef jerky, venison jerky, and much more … all without preservatives with names you can’t pronounce. In this DIY guide to making your own jerky in an oven, smoker, or food dehydrator with beef, venison, poultry, fish, or even soy protein (ground or in strips), you’ll learn the basics for concocting a simple teriyaki marinade as well as easy gourmet recipes for such exotic jerky delights as Bloody Mary, chicken tandoori, mole, Cajun, and honeyed salmon jerky. The jerkies and recipes for using them were taste-tested by family, restaurant staff, friends, and show audiences. So pick up a copy of Jerky now to create your own great-tasting meat snacks!

    Item: 8174

    Author: Mary T. Bell

    Format: Paperback


    Many home cooks-and professionals, as well-swear by the tried-and-true implements they've used for years: the Foley Food Mill that works like a charm every time, the manually operated juicer that's a tradition of family breakfasts, the cast iron skillet that's been handed down through the generations. For serious cooks, there's nothing like a familiar implement, a thing that works exactly as you expect it to.

    Similarly, most people usually have a library of favorite recipes on which they rely: some passed along from relatives and friends, others from mentors and teachers. These are the recipes cooks return to time and time again, in part because they evoke memories of the people who have enjoyed them and prepared them in the past.

    Kitchen Things, by master photographer and respected novelist Richard Snodgrass, celebrates these well-loved objects and recipes and showcases them in an unexpected way-a way that touches upon the science of food, the physics of cooking, the sensory pleasures of eating, and indeed the very nature of life itself.

    In his reflections, the author is aided by his patient, persistent and perceptive wife, Marty, and her mother, from whose Western Pennsylvania farmhouse kitchens the objects and recipes were sourced. The gentle, often humorous repartee between the author and these wise and knowing women forms a running narrative throughout the book.

    Item: 7063

    Author: Richard Snodgrass

    Format: Hardcover


    Life, Liberty, and the Pursuit of Food Rights takes readers on a disturbing cross-country journey from Maine to California through a netherworld of Amish farmers paying big fees to questionable advisers to avoid the quagmire of America’s legal system, secret food police lurking in vans at farmers markets, cultish activists preaching the benefits of pathogens, U.S. Justice Department lawyers clashing with local sheriffs, small Maine towns passing ordinances to ban regulation, and suburban moms worried enough about the dangers of supermarket food that they’ll risk fines and jail to feed their children unprocessed, and unregulated, foods of their choosing.

    Item: 6793

    Author: David Gumpert

    Format: Paperback


    CLEARANCE $15.72 This beautiful new book by 30-year-old writer and photographer Anna H. Blessing introduces readers to the story of the modern heartland farm. The book explores how sustainable practices--and close ties to high-profile chefs and restauranteurs--have propelled the "locally grown" culinary movement into a central feature of life in major cities like Chicago. Blessing lays out the rich histories of 25 midwestern farms through beautiful photography, fascinating anecdotes from farmers and chefs, and up-close looks at what makes each farm so unique. Interest in sustainable farming has been growing rapidly across the country and around the world, emphasizing locally produced and grown foods in place of the mass-marketed offerings from corporate consortia. When inhabitants of major cities choose to purchase food raised in nearby farms, they not only support vital satellite economies, but also improve the social and ecological quality of life along with the environmental sustainability of the world around them. Now there are also innumerable top-tier dining establishments, led by esteemed chefs like Charlie Trotter and Paul Kahan, who scour farmers markets for natural ingredients and develop personal business relationships with small-time farmers to supply their restaurants with the best and most sustainable foods. Locally Grown shows how both long-standing and newly founded farms, along with urban farms and metropolitan nonprofit organizations like Growing Power and City Provisions, are boosting the sustainable food movement throughout Chicago and its neighborhoods. Each chapter profiles a different farm, outlining locale, scale, production, and inner workings while also revealing the captivating backgrounds of each farmer. Blessing shows how each farm and farmer are making efforts to improve sustainability, and describes the behind-the-scenes practices that have made locally grown food an increasingly important part of America's food culture.

    Item: 6700

    Author: Anna H. Blessing

    Format: Paperback


    American eating changed dramatically in the early 20th century. As food production became more industrialized, nutritionists, home economists and so-called racial scientists were all pointing Americans toward a newly scientific approach to diet. Food faddists were rewriting the most basic rules surrounding eating, while reformers were working to reshape the diets of immigrants and the poor. And by the time of World War I, the country's first international aid program was bringing moral advice about food conservation into kitchens around the country. In Modern Food, Moral Food, Helen Zoe Veit argues that the 20th century food revolution was fueled by a powerful conviction that Americans had a moral obligation to use self-discipline and reason, rather than taste and tradition, in choosing what to eat.

    Veit weaves together cultural history and the history of science to bring readers into the strange and complex world of the American Progressive Era. The era's emphasis on science and self-control left a profound mark on American eating, one that remains today in everything from the ubiquity of science-based dietary advice to the tenacious idealization of thinness.

    Item: 7021

    Author: Helen Zoe Veit

    Format: Hardcover


    Harold McGee's On Food and Cooking is a kitchen classic. Hailed by Time magazine as "a minor masterpiece" when it first appeared in 1984, On Food and Cooking is the bible to which food lovers and professional chefs worldwide turn for an understanding of where our foods come from, what exactly they're made of, and how cooking transforms them into something new and delicious.

    Now, for its 20th anniversary, Harold McGee has prepared a new, fully revised and updated edition of On Food and Cooking. He has rewritten the text almost completely, expanded it by two-thirds, and commissioned more than 100 new illustrations. As compulsively readable and engaging as ever, the new On Food and Cooking provides countless eye-opening insights into food, its preparation, and its enjoyment.

    On Food and Cooking pioneered the translation of technical food science into cook-friendly kitchen science and helped give birth to the inventive culinary movement known as "molecular gastronomy." Though other books have now been written about kitchen science, On Food and Cooking remains unmatched in the accuracy, clarity and thoroughness of its explanations, and the intriguing way in which it blends science with the historical evolution of foods and cooking techniques.

    On Food and Cooking is an invaluable and monumental compendium of basic information about ingredients, cooking methods and the pleasures of eating. It will delight and fascinate anyone who has ever cooked, savored or wondered about food.

    Item: 7660

    Author: Harold McGee

    Format: Hardcover


    In 1971, a caravan of 60 brightly painted school buses and assorted other vehicles carrying more than 300 hippie idealists landed on an abandoned farm in central Tennessee. They had a mission: to be a part of something bigger than themselves, to follow a peaceful and spiritual path, and to make a difference in the world. Out to Change the World tells the story of how those hippies established The Farm, one of the largest and longest-lasting intentional communities in the United States. Starting with the 1960s Haight-Ashbury scene where it all began and continuing through the changeover from commune to collective up to the present day, this is the first complete account of The Farm's origins, inception, growth and evolution. By turns inspiring, cautionary, triumphant and wistful, it's a captivating narrative from start to finish.

    Item: 7233

    Author: Douglas Stevenson

    Format: Paperback


    In Pawpaw, author Andrew Moore explores the past, present, and future of this unique fruit, traveling from the Ozarks to Monticello; canoeing the lower Mississippi in search of wild fruit; drinking pawpaw beer in Durham, North Carolina; tracking down lost cultivars in Appalachian hollers; and helping out during harvest season in a Maryland orchard.

    Item: 7632

    Author: Andrew Moore

    Format: Hardcover


    In an era of corporate greed, Bob Moore’s philosophy of putting people before profit is a shining example of what’s right about America. Instead of selling out to numerous bidders who would have made him a very wealthy man, the founder of Bob’s Red Mill Natural Foods gave the $100 million company to his employees.

    Bob Moore’s gift on February 15, 2010 (his 81st birthday) gave hope to an American workforce rocked by a decade of CEOs behaving badly. The national media heralded the announcement as the “feel good story of the recession.” It was an example of a return to ethics in the workplace, but as the legions of fans of Bob’s whole grain natural products would argue, ethics and a sense of corporate responsibility didn’t “return” to Bob’s Red Mill, they never left.

    Most 60-year-old men who saw their business destroyed in an arson fire might have quit or faded away into retirement. Not Bob. After his wooden flour mill burned to the ground in 1988, he considered the 17 employees who counted on him for their livelihood, and started over. He rebuilt, and flourished. He grew the company to become the nation’s leading manufacturer of whole grain natural foods.

    Bob’s is an amazing story of overcoming challenges and making great comebacks. His wife, Charlee, was the inspiration to feed the family healthy natural foods, but it was a divine appointment with a random library book titled John Goffe’s Mill that began Bob’s love affair with the ancient art of milling, using stone wheels to slowly grind grains into nutritious whole wheat flours, cereals, and mixes. His unconventional thinking and passion for healthy living is an inspirational story for readers of all ages.

    Item: 6044

    Author: Ken Koopman

    Format: Paperback


    Social-finance expert Elizabeth Ü explains what every budding entrepreneur should do even before they begin asking for money, including choosing an appropriate ownership model. She covers a wide range of possible funding sources, from traditional public and institutional grant and loan programs to cutting-edge, community crowdfunding models.

    Item: 6867

    Author: Elizabeth U

    Format: Paperback


    Beginning in 2006, the agriculture departments of several large states — with backing from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration — launched a major crackdown on small dairies producing raw milk. Replete with undercover agents, sting operations, surprise raids, questionable test-lab results, mysterious illnesses, propaganda blitzes, and grand jury investigations, the crackdown was designed to disrupt the supply of unpasteurized milk to growing legions of consumers demanding healthier and more flavorful food.

    The Raw Milk Revolution takes readers behind the scenes of the government's tough and occasionally brutal intimidation tactics, as seen through the eyes of milk producers, government regulators, scientists, prosecutors and consumers. It is a disturbing story involving marginally legal police tactics and investigation techniques, with young children used as political pawns in a highly charged atmosphere of fear and retribution.

    Are regulators' claims that raw milk poses a public health threat legitimate? That turns out to be a matter of considerable debate. In assessing the threat, The Raw Milk Revolution reveals that the government's campaign, ostensibly designed to protect consumers from pathogens like Salmonella, E. coli 0157:H7, and listeria, was based in a number of cases on suspect laboratory findings and illnesses attributed to raw milk that could well have had other causes, including, in some cases, pasteurized milk.

    Author David Gumpert dares to ask whether regulators have the public's interest in mind or the economic interests of dairy conglomerates. He assesses how the government's anti–raw-milk campaign fits into a troublesome pattern of expanding government efforts to sanitize the food supply — even in the face of ever-increasing rates of chronic disease like asthma, diabetes, and allergies. The Raw Milk Revolution provides an unsettling view of the future, in which nutritionally dense foods may be available largely through underground channels.

    Item: 6128

    Author: David Gumpert

    Format: Paperback


    Philip Ackerman-Leist refocuses the local-food lens on the broad issue of rebuilding regional food systems that can replace the destructive aspects of industrial agriculture, meet food demands affordably and sustainably, and be resilient enough to endure potentially rough times ahead.

    Item: 7576

    Author: Philip Ackerman-Leist

    Format: Paperback



    A quiet revolution is taking place: People across the United States are turning toward local food. Some are doing it because they want more nutritious, less-processed food; some want to preserve the farmland and rural character of their regions; some fear interruptions to the supply of non-local food; some want to support their local economy; and some want safer food with less threat of contamination. But this revolution comes with challenges.

    Reclaiming Our Food tells the stories of people across America who are finding new ways to grow, process, and distribute food for their own communities. Their successes offer both inspiration and practical advice.

    The projects described in this book are cropping up everywhere, from urban lots to rural communities and everywhere in between. In Portland, Oregon, an organization called Growing Gardens installs home gardens for low-income families and hosts follow-up workshops for the owners. Lynchburg Grows, in Lynchburg, Virginia, bought an abandoned 6.5-acre urban greenhouse business and turned it into an organic farm that offers jobs to people with disabilities and sells its food through a local farmers' market and a CSA. Sunburst Trout Farm, a small family business in rural North Carolina, is showing that it’s possible to raise fish sustainably and sell to a local market. And in Asheville, North Carolina, Growing Minds is finding ways to help bring fresh foods into schools. Author Tanya Denckla Cobb offers behind-the-scenes profiles of more than 50 food projects across the United States, with lessons and advice straight from their founders and staff. Photographic essays of 11 community food projects, by acclaimed photographer Jason Houston, detail the unusual work of these projects, bringing it to life in unforgettable images.

    Reclaiming Our Food is a practical guide for building a local food system. Where others have made the case for the local food movement, Reclaiming Our Food shows how communities are actually making it happen. This book offers a wealth of information on how to make local food a practical and affordable part of everyone's daily fare.

    Item: 5610

    Author: Tanya Denckla Cobb

    Format: Paperback


    Could heritage grains, and the ancient ways they were grown, hold the key to restoring the staff of life to our modern diets? Long considered the Western world’s staple food, modern wheat has been drastically transformed over the past century by the food industry. With these changes, concerns have risen over intolerance and so-called “wheat belly.” What changed? The way that we grow our wheat and the modern varieties have made possible enormous harvests, but with those come steep hidden costs. Large industrial farming, dependent on monocultures and the heavy use of fertilizers and herbicides, have deleterious effects not only on our own health but on our land, water, and environment as a whole. Fortunately, heritage “landrace” wheats—crops that have been selected over generations to be well adapted to their local environments—do not need bio-chemical interventions to grow well and yield bountifully in organic fields. Yet these robust and diverse wheats that nourished our ancestors for generations are nearly extinct today. In Restoring Heritage Grains, author Eli Rogosa invites readers to discover “forgotten” grains: diverse, landrace wheat varieties such as emmer, a strain domesticated in the Fertile Crescent that is perfect for pasta and flatbreads; Rouge de Bordeaux, a French heritage wheat beloved by Europe’s artisan bakers; and delicious einkorn, the most ancient wheat of all, which is drought-resilient and heat-tolerant, and contains more protein and minerals than other grains. These and the many other heritage grains each have a lineage intertwined with that of the human species and can and should be grown once again. Combining the history of grain growing and society, in-depth practical advice on landrace wheat husbandry, wheat folktales and mythology, and recipes for beers, breads, and pastries, Restoring Heritage Grains invites readers to explore a rich history that has been overshadowed by modern industrial wheat. In the end, organically grown, diverse wheat may well be one of the best solutions to hunger, one that will be needed to feed the world’s growing population in the decades to come.

    Item: 7943

    Author: ELI ROGOSA

    Format: Paperback


    Best-selling author Ricki Carroll — known around the world as the Cheese Queen — and her daughter, Sarah Carroll, bring easy cheese making right into your kitchen with this fun guide for kids and families. Step-by-step photos guide kids ages 8–12 through the cheese making process, then teach them how to make 12 classic favorites, including mozzarella, feta, ricotta, and cream cheese. A hearty helping of kitchen chemistry and math along with bits of international cheese making history add to the education. A bonus log sheet lets young cheese makers keep notes just like the pros, while punch-out labels and colorful flags will embellish homemade cheeses and global cheese platters.

    Item: 8778




    Sourdough and other fermented foods are making a comeback because of their rich depth of flavor and proven health benefits. In Sourdough, Owens demystifies keeping a sourdough culture, which is an extended fermentation process that allows for maximum flavor and easy digestion. Laced with botanical and cultural notes on grains, fruits and vegetables, herbs, and even weeds, Sourdough celebrates seasonal abundance alongside the timeless craft of artisan baking.

    Item: 7993

    Author: Sarah Owens

    Format: Hardcover


    Southern Heirloom Cooking brings together treasured family recipes from the South. . This collection of more than 250 dishes includes their best ones. It’s food that’s traditional, full of marvelous flavor, and old timey.It’s food you’ll want to make again and again, and that you’ll want to pass on to your own loved ones.

    Item: 7981

    Author: Norma Jean Mcqueen & Horace

    Format: Paperback

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