What Does “Locally Raised Meat" Mean?


| 7/15/2013 2:47:00 PM


Tags: meat, local, locally-raised, beef,

Author Cole Ward advises consumers to be wary of how the word "local" is marketed.I’m all for keeping my food dollars in my community. What I am not for is paying three times more for local meat and getting the exact same thing as “conventionally-raised” (eg: high-volume production) meat.

When a farm advertises “Vermont Raised” meat, it seems logical to expect that its animals were born on that farm and spent their entire lives there. If the farmer buys cattle from somewhere else, brings them back to the farm for finishing and advertises the meat as “local”, is it really local? Or if the farmer is buying culled cattle from another state and feeding them for a few months, without knowing (or caring) how the animals were treated or fed before they got to him.

Don’t assume this doesn’t happen. It does, much more often than you’d believe. But more to the point – how would you know?

Local doesn’t mean healthy. It’s a claim meant to give people a sense of security about what they’re eating. The local movement is a great movement but increasingly I see the term prostituted by cheats trying to cash in on it.

Another practice that bothers me has to do with farm names. You’ll see a name like “Joe’s Black Angus Farm”, which implies that they only raise and sell true black angus beef cattle, when in fact it’s just a name. Picked on purpose.

Then there are claims like “grass fed." Well, was it grass fed and grass finished? Did it eat just grass all its life right to slaughter or did it graze on grass and spend the last few months of its life eating additive-laced feeds? How would you know?

autumnblessingfarm
7/22/2013 2:53:12 PM

While we wholeheartedly agree that honesty and integrity are essential in locally farmed meats; it is not regulations that further burden the honest farmer and raise consumer prices, but rather relationships that are necessary.  As both a local honest small family meat farmer and consumer we  see relationship as an all important key.  We know, for instance, our our veggie CSA farmers and spend time on their farm.  We trust them and they are trustworthy.  But it takes time to build relationships.  our best customers are the ones who know us and come out to the farm to see what we are doing and just how we do it.  And for us as farmers, we feel safe selling to those we know.

No organization or regulation can give you the same peace of mind.  That is the reason many folks are buying from local farmers and not the grocery store.  We encourage you to take the time to get out to the farms, sit and chat.  Learn and laugh together.  If you feel uneasy, simply say, "Thank you for your time." and keep going until you find someone whom you can trust.  the initial effort is well worth a lifelong relationship with you farmers.

Autumn Blessing Farm


greggzuk
7/20/2013 11:51:22 PM

It means nothing. Lose the hyphen, while you're at it.


glenda
7/15/2013 6:07:51 PM

This is a great article. If you are not sure about local meat call and find out. Also do the use hormones in that meat?

Places like Whole Foods advertise "Local" produce. Unfortunatly, that doesn't mean no pesticides.

 


glenda
7/15/2013 6:07:40 PM

This is a great article. If you are not sure about local meat call and find out. Also do the use hormones in that meat?

Places like Whole Foods advertise "Local" produce. Unfortunatly, that doesn't mean no pesticides.

 





mother earth news fair

MOTHER EARTH NEWS FAIR

Oct. 21-22, 2017
Topeka, KS.

More than 150 workshops, great deals from more than 200 exhibitors, off-stage demos, inspirational keynotes, and great food!

LEARN MORE