Tips for Your First Lamb Roast

Roasting a whole lamb doesn’t need to be intimidating — just make it a community event.

| June/July 2018

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    Explain that you're planning to roast the whole lamb when you're talking to local butchers, so they know how you need the meat prepared.
    Photo by Maggie McGuire
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    Keep the prep simple: Salt, pepper, and lemon will draw out the natural flavor of the meat.
    Photo by Maggie McGuire
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    Be sure to anchor the carcass firmly to the frame; we used heavy wire at our roast.
    Photo by Maggie McGuire
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    A full carcass may have vegetable-dye stamps to indicate USDA inspection.
    Photo by Maggie McGuire
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    Encourage your guests to help out with the roast and to contribute side dishes to the meal.
    Photo by Maggie McGuire
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    A heat shield of pallets and scrap wood makes it easier to get close enough to baste the roasting meat, which will be well worth the wait.
    Photo by Maggie McGuire
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    Well-roasted lamb will be so tender, you'll be able to pull pieces free with your hands.
    Photo by Maggie McGuire
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    Use sturdy work gloves to protect your hands from searing-hot wire and metal roasting frames.
    Maggie McGuire
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    Big smiles and full stomachs are the perfect reward after planning a lamb roast.
    Photo by

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  • Eggy Ding

Few things look as festive or bring a community together more spectacularly than roasting a whole animal. The smell of wood smoke and roasting meat and the sounds of laughter and fire could waft from the coast of Italy, an island in Greece, the playa of Argentina — or a vacant lot in Detroit.

Detroit is made up of small neighborhoods, each with its own character and community. In recent years, a surge of interest in urban agriculture has brought natural treasures to unexpected places: a flower farm in an industrial area, a new grove of fruit trees, and a large-scale urban farm in a public park.

Last year, in a little neighborhood in Detroit, my friend Sam and I held a spring lamb roast for his birthday. Our friends and neighbors celebrated on a small farm created from formerly vacant lots, gathering around a fire until dark.

More than any real technical problem, the main barrier to your first lamb roast will be how intimidating roasting a whole animal can seem. Take these tips to heart and allow yourself time to loosen up, enjoy your guests, and savor the smoke.



Preparing to Roast the Lamb

First things first, let’s acknowledge the elephant in the room: There are easier ways to cook a lovely dinner. Roasting a whole animal is really for the spectacle, not the ease of cooking! With that in mind, consider the roast a performance. You can roast a whole animal on a spit, toss it on a grate over the coals, or even bury it luau-style — no matter what, it’ll be delicious.

For our lamb roast, I favored a complicated plan involving a spit powered by a stationary bicycle, so our guests would have to pedal for their supper. However, it was Sam’s birthday (and he would be constructing the thing), and he was more intrigued by an Argentinian-style asado. We used a 3-foot-tall metal scaffold to hold the lamb at a 45-degree angle above the embers. We threaded metal wire between bones and ligaments to attach the lamb to the structure.






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