Roasting Your Coffee Beans at Home

Learn how to roast your own coffee beans right at home just the way you love them.

| March 2018

  • Roasting your own coffee beans at home lets you get the exact flavor you love.
    Photo by Pixabay/StockSnap
  • “The Home Barista” by Simone Egger and Ruby Ashby Orr teaches readers how to take their favorite coffee bean and turn it into the perfect of cup of coffee.
    Photo courtesy of The Experiment Publishing

The Home Barista (The Experiment, 2015) by Simone Egger and Ruby Ashby Orr teaches readers the ins and outs of brewing their favorite cup of coffee right at home. Egger and Ashby Orr walk readers through eight different methods of brewing after roasting your own beans. In this excerpt, they layout out multiple methods of roasting your coffee beans ta home.

There are plenty of good home roasters around, but you don’t want to invest in a top-of-the-line roaster only to find out that you find roasting dull and frustrating. Luckily, hobby roasters have established all sorts of creative ways to roast their coffee without resorting to bulky or pricey roasting machines. You might want to try these methods out first to see if roasting does it for you.

Manual roasting can take anywhere between ten and twenty minutes, and tends to result in a more full-bodied flavor, though you’re more likely to be left with an uneven roast, where some beans are darker than others.

If anyone ever turns their nose up at your home-roasted beans, then Jabez Burns is just the name you need to shut down those naysayers.



Burns was a roasting pioneer whose improved industrial coffee roaster, invented in New York in 1864, changed the face of commercial coffee production. And even he wasn’t averse to a bit of DIY roasting, declaring that some of the best coffee he ever tasted had been roasted in a hand-cranked popcorn maker. Well, if it’s good enough for our friend Burns, it’s good enough for anyone.

Oven

This is perhaps the most accessible of all roasting methods: all you need is a flat, perforated pan—the kind you might use to bake pizza or bread—and a conventional oven with reasonably reliable temperatures. If you don’t have a perforated pan you can always just punch some small holes in a regular baking tray. It’s then just a matter of spreading the beans evenly on the tray and popping them in the oven to go through their six roasting stages.



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