Mouse Melons

Kissin’ cousins to cucumbers, Mexican mouse melons pack a flavorful wallop despite their Lilliputian size.

| June/July 2005

  • 210-062-01i2

    ROB CARDILLO
  • Mouse Melons
    The melon’s most common name in Spanish is “sandíita” (little watermelon), but it has a slew of other monikers in local dialects and Native American languages, many of which translate as “mouse melon.”
    Photo courtesy SEED SAVERS EXCHANGE

  • 210-062-01i2
  • Mouse Melons

A tiny melon from south of the border has been creating a buzz in the farmer’s markets. Its unique flavor, with hints of cucumber and green fava bean, its pest-free and rampant habit of growth, not to mention its huge productivity, all conspire to recommend this unusual vine to home gardeners looking for something new to add to their menus.

The melon’s most common name in Spanish is “sandíita” (little watermelon), but it has a slew of other monikers in local dialects and Native American languages, many of which translate as “mouse melon.” These colloquial names are not surprising because the fruits resemble superminiaturized watermelons, the perfect scale for a mouse-sized picnic.

The scientific name of this plant is Melothria scabra. It is native to Mexico and Central America, and was first described scientifically in 1866 by the French botanist Charles Victor Naudin. I should add in the same breath that Naudin’s Latin nomenclature for the melon is not engraved in stone because there is quite a bit of argument as to where this plant belongs by botanical classification, especially because it has very close relatives in Africa.

If botanists have been late in coming to terms with the mouse melon, Native American peoples have not. It has been a staple of Mexican and Central American diets since pre-Columbian times, hence its great array of names in indigenous languages. These people also use the melon in nonculinary ways, including in medicine, yet little of this information can be found in mainstream literature.



Few, if any, Mexican cookbooks written for North Americans include recipes on how to use mouse melons, yet seeds are readily available in the United States. Now is a good time for our cooks to catch up, especially vegetarian cooks looking for exciting, new ingredients.

Mouse melons are terrific in stir-fries; they can be pickled just like French gherkins, eaten raw in salads or put up like Polish dill pickles. They also can be chopped and added to salsas for extra texture and flavor.

abha
10/10/2017 10:43:45 AM

I live in the Pacific NW USA--zone 8. I have grown these melons for around 2-3 years. I used quite a large planting pot; that worked quite well. As a trellis, I put some 2x4" deer fencing in a ring at the soil level of the pot. I cut the fencing so it would be around 2-3' tall above the top rim of the pot. It doesn't take many plants for the trellis to be covered with vines. It is a big space saver. Last year I used a bigger pot with more plants--I got a lot of mouse melons which we used to make refrigerator pickles. Last year I started them earlier than this year. In 2017 with the smaller planting pot, I got them going the middle of July. The pot used this year was at least 3-4 gallons and had a flowerpot shape. I wasn't sure I would get a harvest, but with only 4-5 plants, the little mouse melon came through with enough to produce around a quart of them. It is now near mid October and our frosts are late this year, and the plants are still doing well. It is quite a fun plant. I saw bees and bumble bees pollinating them.


abhar
10/10/2017 10:43:44 AM

I live in the Pacific NW USA--zone 8. I have grown these melons for around 2-3 years. I used quite a large planting pot; that worked quite well. As a trellis, I put some 2x4" deer fencing in a ring at the soil level of the pot. I cut the fencing so it would be around 2-3' tall above the top rim of the pot. It doesn't take many plants for the trellis to be covered with vines. It is a big space saver. Last year I used a bigger pot with more plants--I got a lot of mouse melons which we used to make refrigerator pickles. Last year I started them earlier than this year. In 2017 with the smaller planting pot, I got them going the middle of July. The pot used this year was at least 3-4 gallons and had a flowerpot shape. I wasn't sure I would get a harvest, but with only 4-5 plants, the little mouse melon came through with enough to produce around a quart of them. It is now near mid October and our frosts are late this year, and the plants are still doing well. It is quite a fun plant. I saw bees and bumble bees pollinating them.


MacNC7a
6/16/2016 7:51:34 AM

When is the best time to harvest? Should I wait until they fall off the vine for the best taste? Pick them off the vine when they're 1" long, 1/2" thick, 2" long, specific color???







Mother Earth News Fair Schedule 2019

MOTHER EARTH NEWS FAIR

Next: February, 16-17 2019
Belton, TX

Whether you want to learn how to grow and raise your own food, build your own root cellar, or create a green dream home, come out and learn everything you need to know — and then some!

LEARN MORE






Subscribe Today - Pay Now & Save 64% Off the Cover Price

Money-Saving Tips in Every Issue!

Mother Earth NewsAt MOTHER EARTH NEWS, we are dedicated to conserving our planet's natural resources while helping you conserve your financial resources. You'll find tips for slashing heating bills, growing fresh, natural produce at home, and more. That's why we want you to save money and trees by subscribing through our earth-friendly automatic renewal savings plan. By paying with a credit card, you save an additional $5 and get 6 issues of MOTHER EARTH NEWS for only $12.95 (USA only).

You may also use the Bill Me option and pay $17.95 for 6 issues.

Canadian Subscribers - Click Here
International Subscribers - Click Here
Canadian subscriptions: 1 year (includes postage & GST).


Facebook Pinterest Instagram YouTube Twitter flipboard
Free Product Information Classifieds

}