Most Amazing Hoop House Piping for Season Extension


| 7/5/2016 2:21:00 PM


 

Extending the growing season in the Pacific Northwest can be tricky. There are two limiting factors — light and warmth. Without adding electric lights, there is not much we can do about the amount of light we receive. The region is divided by the 45th parallel. In winter, the sun comes up around 7am, sets by 4:30pm, is low in the sky, and is often obscured by clouds.

When I experimented with lettuce seed in the new greenhouse last January by planting a 6-pack every Saturday for 2 months, none of it sprouted for weeks, then it sat in the 6-packs, waiting for light, until Mid-February, when it all took off.  Without lights, nothing will really grow between Halloween and Candlemas.

The goal in winter gardening is to get the growth on by the early fall, as the light declines,  keep it for harvest in the mid-winter and  protect the crops waiting for spring in the fields. Then, in the spring, we want to dry and prep the soil a little earlier, plant out tough early crops, and provide a little extra warmth until the light levels really kick in. This is where flexible hoop houses come into action.

PVC vs Aluminum Tubes for Hoop Houses



After messing around for years with PVC pipe found by the side of the road (free!) and repurposed windows on a wooden cold frame (also free!), I have upgraded to 10-foot-long aluminum tubes, bent by a friend in exchange for a hand-knit hat. They are amazing, both in my home garden of raised beds and in the fields of Sunbow Farm, where I first saw them in action.

albrown31
11/8/2017 4:59:16 PM

New here I am but growing a garden early is what I'm about. Using two old 15 foot trampolines and applying 1"x 4' seperation poles I have built a 21'long x 15"wide x about 8' high. I am considering extending the ends another 3' higher to give me more room to walk around under and hang lighting with florsient lights and special blue-colored grow light with a hood reflector. The weather is growing colder now so between rain drops and some wind I will be covering the hoop building as I call it with 6mil plastic I've had in the barn (20'x100') for years. I have an old wood burning cast iron stove-heater and 6" exhaust tubes with a damper to regulate the heat. It is my hope to finish the project before the weather gets too bad. In the mean-time I' have to figgure how I intend to build the end walls and door. Coyoterunner


ecostewards
11/23/2016 7:48:01 AM

Instead of expensive spring clamps to hold the plastic sheeting in place, I bought a length of black PVC plastic pipe for about $10, which provided enough clamps for six 4' x 8" raised beds. The inside diameter of the black pipe matches the outside diameter of the pipe used for the hoop. I then cut the black pipe into 3" lengths and t slit them open down their length, to form tube clamps that easily fit over the plastic sheeting and the hoops. I use five "tube" clamps on each hoop and they stay on all winter. They also work extremely well for keeping row cover in place in spring and summer. They slide easily on the hoops, so that I can raise and lower the sides of the plastic or mesh to let in air and to water the plants inside the hoops.


ecostewards
11/23/2016 7:46:38 AM

Instead of expensive spring clamps to hold the plastic sheeting in place, I bought a length of black PVC plastic pipe for about $10, which provided enough clamps for six 4' x 8" raised beds. The inside diameter of the black pipe matches the outside diameter of the pipe used for the hoop. I then cut the black pipe into 3" lengths and t slit them open down their length, to form tube clamps that easily fit over the plastic sheeting and the hoops. I use five "tube" clamps on each hoop and they stay on all winter. They also work extremely well for keeping row cover in place in spring and summer. They slide easily on the hoops, so that I can raise and lower the sides of the plastic or mesh to let in air and to water the plants inside the hoops.






Subscribe Today - Pay Now & Save 64% Off the Cover Price

Money-Saving Tips in Every Issue!

Mother Earth NewsAt MOTHER EARTH NEWS, we are dedicated to conserving our planet's natural resources while helping you conserve your financial resources. You'll find tips for slashing heating bills, growing fresh, natural produce at home, and more. That's why we want you to save money and trees by subscribing through our earth-friendly automatic renewal savings plan. By paying with a credit card, you save an additional $5 and get 6 issues of MOTHER EARTH NEWS for only $12.95 (USA only).

You may also use the Bill Me option and pay $17.95 for 6 issues.

Canadian Subscribers - Click Here
International Subscribers - Click Here
Canadian subscriptions: 1 year (includes postage & GST).


Facebook Pinterest Instagram YouTube Twitter flipboard

Free Product Information Classifieds Newsletters