How to Build A Vegetable Bed Biodynamically, Part 2


| 5/11/2016 10:27:00 AM


Tags: biodynamic, garden planning, soil building, soil health, Emma Raven, Misfit Gardening, Utah,

Raised biodynamic bed

Building raised vegetable beds has many benefits; they negate contending with poor soil, you can make them tall to avoid bending, avoid soil compaction and they look appealing to name a few.  But how can you make them biodynamic?

As I discussed in Part 1, incorporating biodynamic preparations to the vegetable garden is easy but requires time to stir to activate the preparation before use, however for a raised bed, following the principles of biodynamic growing methods may be a little trickier.

Part 1 bed
Biodynamic bed from Part 1 two weeks on with huge growth from elderberry, currant and filbert.

The Farm is an Individual Entity

In biodynamic agriculture, the farm is considered to be the center of activity and is an individual entity. It is a fundamental principal that the biodynamic farm is self sustaining — the animals produce the manure that feed the land, the crops thrive on the nutrients of the land and the crops feed the animals and the people of the farm who in turn add to the compost pile which builds the soil.

Like the biodynamic farm, the biodynamic garden should be able to produce all that it needs and compost or manure brought in should be limited. An analogy to explain would be taking medicine for a short period of time to help with an illness. Bringing compost and manure from external sources is a temporary solution to help overcome the problem but once the garden is running, you should be able to generate the materials for the compost heap and the fertility of the soil.




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