Growing More Vegetables on Less Land

Learn gardening practices to grow ten times more poundage off the same plot of organically-rich ground by (1) planting jumbo varieties of vegetables, (2) concentrating on the heavy yielders and (3) doublecropping.


| May/June 1972



vegetable gardening

By choosing the right varieties of vegetable, and doubling up on your planting, you can greatly increase your harvests.


PHOTO: FOTOLIA/AUREMAR

I've got a big family to feed and the food production aspect of gardening is serious business for me. So serious, that after five years of experimenting and testing, I've learned to grow ten times more poundage off the same plot of organically-rich ground. I do it by (1) planting jumbo varieties of vegetables, (2) concentrating on the heavy yielders and (3) doublecropping.

Plant Giant Vegetables

When you're feeding five to 20 people, it helps to grow the jumbos. Things like 20-pound cabbages, 50-pound squash, 40-pound watermelons, 2 1/2 pound onions, 1 1/4-pound potatoes and mature broccoli bigger than your own head!

The secret? Just plant seeds of the right varieties. Such naturally big vegetables are not novelties. They're mild, tender and all-around top quality . . . they just put more on the table, in jars and the freezer. Let's look at a few.

I now grow two kinds of broccoli. One, Early Spartan, matures in 58 days and provides delicious medium-size heads for very early table use. My second—and main—broccoli crop is Hybrid Neptune. Its heads are a foot or more in diameter and ready for harvest in about 70 days. With this giant, very little space and effort are required to grow ample quantities of the vegetable for canning and freezing.

I used to plant all kinds of peas. Now I rely only on Progress No. 9. It's early. It's quality. In my gardens, this one variety yields more pods to the vine, more peas to the pod, than any other I've tried. And size! I've measured many green, round, shelled Progress No. 9 peas over a half-inch in diameter . . . which means more pounds in the freezer.

Giant pumpkins? Connecticut Field and Big Max are the answer.





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