Planting Tips for a Better Potato Harvest


| 3/15/2018 11:55:00 AM


Tags: organic gardening, potatoes, planting, benedict vanheems,

 potato

Chit (sprout) your seed potatoes in a cool, well-ventilated area before planting to give them a head start and help boost yields. Plant potatoes in a sunny spot, into rich soil. You can add extra nourishment for the plants using a slow-release organic fertilizer such as chicken manure pellets.

Growing Potatoes in Trenches

Growing potatoes in parallel trenches makes them easy to hill as they grow. Plant seed potatoes with shoots facing upwards a foot apart, in rows one and a half to two feet apart depending on variety. If your soil is loose enough you can excavate a hole for each seed potato instead of digging a trench.

Hilling up increases the amount of organic matter around the roots so there’s more space for the tubers to grow. It also prevents any that grow near the surface from turning green. You can hill up using the surrounding soil plus other organic matter such as dried leaves, well-rotted manure or grass clippings.

Start hilling once the shoots are up to your ankle, and keep doing so until the foliage has filled out between the rows.



No-Till Potatoes

Potatoes can also be grown in a no-till system. Simply nestle the sprouted potatoes into the soil surface, then cover them with an eight-inch-thick layer of organic matter such as compost, dried leaves, hay or straw. Check with your supplier that there’s no risk of any herbicide residues if you’re using hay or straw.

Fatcatbanksters
4/1/2018 5:33:02 PM

Maggie...It is obviously chicken manure that has been made into a pellet form. Think about pelleted lime, for example. It is formed into a slow release pellet. It is available on line and in some large farm supply stores.


Maggie
3/30/2018 5:53:07 PM

What are "chicken manure pellets"? The only chicken manure I am familiar with does not look anything like pellets! And chicken manure is not usually consider slow-release. Quite the opposite. Now, goat or rabbit manure comes in pellets and could be considered slow-release.


Maggie
3/30/2018 5:47:36 PM

What are "chicken manure pellets"? The only chicken manure I am familiar with does not look anything like pellets! And chicken manure is not usually consider slow-release. Quite the opposite. Now, goat or rabbit manure comes in pellets and could be considered slow-release.







mother earth news fair 2018 schedule

MOTHER EARTH NEWS FAIR

Next: August 4-5, 2018
Albany, OR

Whether you want to learn how to grow and raise your own food, build your own root cellar, or create a green dream home, come out and learn everything you need to know — and then some!

LEARN MORE