The Green Party, Quilting for Peace and More

Read about the many things that people are doing to promote a safer and healthier environment.


| November/December 1983



The Green Party

The ecologically oriented Green Party is emerging in the United States political scene, and it has the backing of former California Secretary of Resources Huey D. Johnson.


PHOTO: BOB HARTMAN

In celebration of folks involved in MOTHER EARTH NEWS-type doings around the world.

Huey D. Johnson: The Green Party

Last spring, 27 of West Germany's Greens — a group of environmentalists and antinuclear activists — were elected to the national legislature (the Bundestag). Now, the ecologically oriented Green Party is emerging on the United States political scene, and it has the backing of former California Secretary of Resources Huey D. Johnson. Huey plans to raise $500,000 seed money for the party, and hopes that the Greens will have an impact on the 1984 presidential election (they'll support the candidate whose views most closely correspond with their party's principles).

Johnson is optimistic that the growth, recognition, and acceptance of the Green Party in the U.S. will help to bring about some much-needed changes in government policy. Huey believes that the land is the basis of all wealth, and that national survival depends — to a large extent — on how we manage our natural resources. (As the head of his state's Resources Agency, the dedicated environmentalist was responsible for opening 400 miles of spawning streams for salmon and steelhead — which had been closed for a century — and worked for the development of a "desalter" that could be used to make agricultural wastewater suitable for use in irrigation.)

Huey would like to see a decrease in the military budget, with the resulting funds used to "do something for the human spirit . . . provide homes, health care, and education". If Johnson and the Greens have their way, a genuine concern for the quality of people's lives will be "part of the total picture".—Cynthia J. Lambert.

Anne Hausrath and Diane Jones: Quilting for Peace 

Boise, Idaho residents Anne Hausrath and Diane Jones resolved to take an active part in the promotion of world peace, and the Boise Peace Quilt Project was conceived. Taking to heart the suggestion that "making friends with a Russian" might be a step toward peace, Anne and Diane decided to produce a quilt to be given to the people of a Soviet city. The two women invited others to join in the project, and they soon had a group of 35 eager quilters. Several months later — on May 25, 1982 — the first peace quilt was presented to the Russian embassy. The carefully made patchwork was later displayed in Moscow by the Soviet Women's Committee, and now rests in its permanent home, Alytus, Lithuania. The Women's Soviet, Lithuania S.S.R. wrote that the quilt "excites us very much and makes us happy because our women . . . are also striving for peace and friendship".

The Boise project is still going strong. A quilt has been presented to Norman Cousins in recognition of his work toward peace, and one was recently fashioned for the people of Hiroshima, Japan. Public response to the group's work has been very enthusiastic, and at least three other peace-quilting teams have been organized in different parts of the U.S. In fact, a San Carlos, California woman (who started a project in her own community) is wondering if the handmade quilt might become "a symbol of peace and negotiation in the way that the bell has long been a symbol of independence and the cry for freedom". The Boise quilters would like that.—Paige Boule.





mother earth news fair

MOTHER EARTH NEWS FAIR

Oct. 21-22, 2017
Topeka, KS.

More than 150 workshops, great deals from more than 200 exhibitors, off-stage demos, inspirational keynotes, and great food!

LEARN MORE