Pounding the Pavement and Inflating Dew Worms

Canadian air gives a lift to night crawlers and a job hunter weary of pounding the pavement.


| October/November 1998



pounding the pavement - dew worms

An eccentric uncle and his unconventional fishing methods were our correspondent's respite from pounding the pavement.


ILLUSTRATION: SMART ART/M.E. COHEN

In show business, they call it "being between engagements." I've heard executives talk about "headhunters beating the bushes" for them. And we’ve all heard of "pounding the pavement." That’s I was doing, had been doing, for many months. Yet despite those months of reading classifieds, scouring the Internet, and sending e-mail and snail mail, I had nothing to show for it.

It was about that time that I got a postcard from my Uncle Charlie "Hap" Hazard. He has a cabin up above Sault Ste. Marie, Canada, six miles east of the Agawa Canyon.

"Come on up," was all he wrote.

"Why not?" I thought. Maybe I could use a dose of living close to nature.

It was during my first morning at Hap's that I learned about his sense of time. After breakfast, we began working on the roof of the cabin. Forty minutes later, we stopped for coffee and a donut. Forty minutes later, we paused again. When we had stopped for the fourth time before noon, I finally confronted my uncle. "Can't we just work for a stretch? At this rate, we'll be at it all day."

"That's the point," Hap allowed. "We're not in a factory, where work starts and stops by shifts. What good would it do to work straight through till 4:30 and sit around for seven hours till bedtime?"

Later that evening, after 12 cups of coffee and the same number of snacks, I hardly had an appetite for Supper. "All those breaks still feel like a waste of time to me," I grumbled.





mother earth news fair

MOTHER EARTH NEWS FAIR

Oct. 21-22, 2017
Topeka, KS.

More than 150 workshops, great deals from more than 200 exhibitors, off-stage demos, inspirational keynotes, and great food!

LEARN MORE