Discovering Nature and Wildlife With a Trail Camera


| 10/10/2014 4:07:00 PM


Tags: wildlife, nature, trail camera, Les Davenport, Illinois,

Cardinal in Snow

The trail camera is used by sportsmen for learning the what, where and when about game animals. These relatively new devices started in their infancy as security cameras about three decades ago. Wildlife biologists quickly repurposed the standalone cameras as game management tools. Hunting equipment companies jumped on the bandwagon and began marketing them to outdoorsmen to promote success. Today the trail camera market is flooded with varying makes and models and prices.

Millions of these spy-eyes are sold at hunting equipment retailers each year. Surprisingly, more than half are purchased by individuals and businesses for security measures or by nature lovers for wildlife viewing. Trespassing, theft, harassment and other misconducts caught on camera have made a case for offended citizens. Just the warning that a security camera is on duty can discourage crime and mischief. For animal observation, the possibilities are limitless.

Have you ever wondered what goes on in your backyard or barn lot when you’re not home or at night? A trail camera offers users a detailed report that sometimes explains the unexplainable. For instance, your bird feeder, filled with thistle seed, literally had multitudes of gold finches visiting it, but now its void of the cheery yellow-black callers. A location-placed camera could reveal that a predator bird, such as a kestrel or falcon, may be using the feeder as its focal hunting ground.

Our farm has a small creek that became backed up by a beaver dam. Small trees that inhibited bank erosion were steadily disappearing, chewed down and converted to dam material. I dismantled the obstruction multiple times with a tractor to discourage these industrious tree-eaters from using the area. Each deconstruction was met with a reconstruction, and—unbelievably—almost overnight. The immediate assumption was that these elaborate rebuilds required the efforts of several adult beavers. Rocks, some the size of a basketball, were moved a quarter the length of a football field to reinforce the dam’s structure.

After placing a trail camera at the dam site, I was astonished to learn that only a single, 25-pound beaver was the culprit; it had moved into the area from a larger creek and was determined to set up house. Since the tractor deconstructed much quicker than the beaver reconstructed, the lone animal finally got the hint  after a couple of weeks and moved back to the larger stream. A beaver can live two to three decades, and though a large one might weigh 60 pounds, I’ve personally seen trapped specimens that tip the scale at nearly 100 pounds.

Johan
3/22/2015 8:31:57 AM

There are 11 variables to watch out for while buying a trail camera: 1. Image Quality 2. Battery and Power Options 3. Trigger Time 4. Different Types of Trail Cameras 5. Should I Go For Flash or Infrared? 6. Detection Circuit 7. Video or Picture 8. Memory 9. Security Boxed and Anti Theft Cables 10. Viewing Screens 11. Budget and Price Source: http://www.besttrailcamerareviews.org/ Obviously everyone has their own priorities, however your choice should be based on the above attributes. As far as manufacturing is concerned, it is a fact that most trail cameras are made in China and that doesn't necessarily mean bad quality. Yes, at times cameras don't work straight out of the box, however there are many that do work and the ones that do are known for their quality.





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