Moose Repopulation Explosion, Milk and Health and Greenhouse Plastics

This short series of reports includes news on the once-endangered moose repopulation of its former range, milk helps your overall health and greenhouses made of certain plastics can actually harm plants growing there.


| July/August 1985



Bits and Pieces repopulation of moose

The once-endangered moose has begun to repopulate much of its former range.


PHOTO: FOTOLIA/BGSMITH

News briefs on the moose repopulation of its former range, milk and your overall health, and greenhouses that can actually damage plants. 

Moose Repopulation Explosion, Milk and Health and Greenhouse Plastics

Moose on the Loose 

The once-endangered moose has begun to repopulate much of its former range. Moose are showing up in areas where they haven't been seen since the 1700s. New Hampshire now has an estimated 2,000 moose, and Vermont, 600. Even New York and Massachusetts report frequent sightings. Maine, whose moose population is conservatively estimated at 20,000, seems to be the seedbed of the comeback.

But the folks in Michigan aren't going to wait for the moose to emigrate from Maine. The Wolverine state has some prime habitat that hasn't seen a moose since the loggers arrived in the 1880s. So Michigan traded grouse to Missouri for wild turkeys, adding them to a cache of Michigan gobblers, which, in turn, was traded to Ontario for 15 moose, with an option for 15 more. Wildlife biologists hope the moose will thrive in Michigan's forests.

Gardens for Almost All 

Here are figures that speak for themselves: In 1984, 40% of U.S. households had a vegetable garden. Those households spent, on the average, $32 for gardening materials, worked one to four hours a week tending their gardens, and harvested produce worth $356. The total yields of household gardens in the U.S. came to 13.5 billion pounds, with a retail value of $12 billion. It's interesting to note that the wealthiest households—those with incomes over $40,000—were the most likely to have gardens, while households bringing in less than $7,000 were the least likely. Lack of space and too little time were the most common reasons given for not planting.





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