The Impact of Farm Runoff on Drinking Water

As pesticides, nutrients and sediment from farms trickle down into Midwestern waterways, water treatment plants spend millions to clean up the polluted drinking water.


| August 13, 2013


Reposted with permission from Harvest Public Media

It doesn’t come as a major surprise that agricultural runoff is doing more harm than good to the environment. Agriculture is the nation’s leading cause of impaired water quality, according to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Storms move pesticides, nutrients and sediment from farmers’ fields to nearby waterways. These will ultimately end up in the Gulf of Mexico where they can threaten aquatic life.

But what about the impact of farm runoff on our drinking water?

Ag runoff feeds into lakes and rivers that hundreds of towns draw their water from. For example, herbicide runoff from a farm in Centralia, Mo., might end up in Goodwater Creek, which empties into the Salt River, which then flows into Mark Twain Lake. That lake provides drinking water for 70,000 residents. Water treatment plants spend millions on chemicals to clean up that surface water.

In Stoutsville, Mo., the Clarence Cannon Wholesale Water Commission treats 1.5 billion gallons of water each year. During a recent visit to its treatment plant, the commission’s general manager, Mark McNally, pointed out a massive bag of fine black powder being funneled into untreated water.

“That's 900 pounds of powdered activated carbon and that actually gets transferred over here and that is basically metered into the water,” McNally said.





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