Cycles of War

This series of excerpts from R.E. McMaster, Jr.'s "Cycles of War: The Next Six Years" points out threats caused by business, weather, and other cycles that could cause international wars, national revolutions and other conflicts.


| May/June 1978



Cycles of War

"Cycles of War" author R. E. McMaster says several factors could increase the chances of international war.


PHOTO: FOTOLIA/OLEG ZABIELIN

R.E. McMaster, Jr. graduated cum laude from the University of Houston, has been initiated into four national honor societies, was both a United States Air Force captain (certified to instruct in the supersonic T-38) and a senior instructor at the U.S. Air Force Academy, has been — at one time — one of only five commodity trading advisors formally approved by the international firm of Hornblower and Weeks, and is currently editor of The Reaper, a respected internationally circulated economic and trading advisory service which specializes in the analysis of commodity markets. 

It is news when a man of Mr. McMaster's stature spends 13 years researching a book, and it is news when that book is finally published. Especially when the finished work — in this case, Cycles of War: The Next Six Years — documents the fact that a great number of business, weather, and other cycles all point to one thing: the extremely high probability of international wars, national revolutions, riots, and other conflicts in our very immediate future. Here are some brief excerpts from Cycles of War. We hope they'll whet your appetite enough to make you want your own copy of the book. 


It has become apparent to me — through traveling around the country, speaking to investment groups, and visiting with Americans — that there is a nagging sense of uneasiness among our citizenry, about the future of the United States over the next few years. Investors are intent upon retrenching and maintaining their wealth. Caution is their watchword. The "sensitives" of the country — the psychics, poets, artists, composers, and writers — all express considerable insecurity over the future at hand. Intellectuals and educators are voicing concern, and the masses are beginning to feel impending danger. The nostalgia of the past few years is only an indication of the wish to withdraw to more pleasant times.

In Cycles of War: The Next Six Years, I shall bring to light evidence that not only substantiates but helps to account for this condition of national restlessness.


The institute of war lies close to the heart of mankind . . . In our recent Western history, war has been following war in an ascending order of intensity. If the series continues, the progression will indubitably be carried to even higher terms, until this process of intensifying the horrors of war is one day brought to an end by the self-annihilation of the war-making society.

This is the somber conclusion of the leading secular historian of the twentieth century, Arnold Toynbee. Toynbee's words are food for thought, particularly when one considers that the man spent forty years writing three million words with well over 19,000 footnotes for his monumental work, A Study of History. 

Yet, among U.S. citizens, discussion of warfare is as rare as a fulfilled political promise. It could almost be classified as a social taboo, not proper for conversation at bridge clubs, cocktail parties, poker games, or gatherings for Monday night football. It hardly goes down well with a Ritz or a Schlitz. (Few Americans, however, would be willing to bet their lives that the subject is unimportant.)





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