DIY





Discover the Benefits of Lemon Grass Tea

Whether or not it aids digestions or helps high blood pressure, lemongrass tea is a refreshing beverage. And if you live in a warm climate you can grow the plant yourself.

| September/October 1978

No Spanish American’s herb garden was complete — at least here in California during the state’s early days — unless it contained te-de-limon, or lemongrass. Then, over the years, the plant, like so many other sources of natural drinks and “cures,” slowly faded from use and cultivation. Today’s renewed and still-growing interest in herbs and herb teas, however, is now bringing te-de-limon back once again: For the first time in years, dried lemongrass is being sold — and purchased! — in health food stores throughout southern California.

Although there seems to be little scientific basis for the claims, Mexican folk medicine holds that the benefits of lemongrass tea include: aiding digestion, calming nervous disorders and helping in the treatment of high blood pressure. Cymbopogon citratus — as the plant is known to the botanist — is also cultivated and distilled in Java, Ceylon, Malaysia and Central America for its oil (which is used in pharmaceutical preparations and skincare products). Furthermore, according to Dorothy Hall’s The Book of Herbs, lemongrass contains vitamin A and is good for “those who wish to have bright eyes and a clear skin.” 

Well, I can't vouch for those claims, but I do know from firsthand experience that Cymbopogon citratus is a perennial grass that can be grown either in the garden or as an indoor (or outdoor) potted plant. It thrives in warm weather (it does not do well in extremely cold climates), grows from two to four feet tall, and — when used as a background for other plants — can add a tropical touch to the garden. Lemongrass seldom bears seeds and is almost always propagated from a section of root. That propagation, however, is easy: The plant thrives on nothing more than a sunny spot, rich soil, and plenty of water.

Just as its name implies, lemongrass easily brews up into a delightful, lemony-flavored tea. Cut several long blades of foliage from the plant, wash them, and chop them into inch-long pieces with a pair of scissors. Then cover the bits of grass with water, bring the liquid to a boil, and steep for 10 to fifteen minutes. Or if you prefer, you can place the cut-up foliage in a heated teapot, pour boiling water into the container, and steep until the resulting tea is as strong as you want it. Sweeten the hot drink with honey, or chill the tea and serve it cold.



I’m one of the growing number of devotees who think that lemongrass tea has a never-to-be-forgotten flavor. It was the memory of a “long ago” cup of the drink, in fact, that recently made me set out to purchase a Cymbopogon citratus for my San Diego garden. Imagine my dismay when I learned that no local plant nursery offered lemongrass for sale!

“Harumph,” I harumphed. “I’ll just start visiting all my elderly Mexican friends, until I find one who still has a treasured old te-de-limon growing away in one of the back corners of his or her vegetable patch. And then, maybe, he or she will offer me a root from the plant.” 

Divya
4/7/2018 6:34:01 AM

Lemongrass tea has long been acclaimed in the herbal tea market for its strong aroma and tangy taste. Lemongrass benefits skin by detoxifying it helps prevent gastrointestinal disorders and elevates the immunity. Various lemongrass tea recipes include the inclusion of honey, a chunk of cinnamon or an extra drop of lemon, however, lemongrass olive tea in itself tastes quite wholesome and doesn’t usually require any added elements. The question of making lemongrass tea is quite simply answered in the sense that no lose ingredients need to be procured for making Lemongrass Olive Tea. In conclusion, this particular herbal tea is impressively light with a zesty aftertaste and aforementioned lemongrass health and medicinal benefits. Read more: http://bit.ly/2Ess9rz


Divya
4/7/2018 6:34:00 AM

Lemongrass tea has long been acclaimed in the herbal tea market for its strong aroma and tangy taste.Lemongrass benefits skin by detoxifying it helps prevent gastrointestinal disorders and elevates the immunity. Various lemongrass tea recipes include the inclusion of honey, a chunk of cinnamon or an extra drop of lemon, however, lemongrass olive tea in itself tastes quite wholesome and doesn’t usually require any added elements. The question of making lemongrass tea is quite simply answered in the sense that no lose ingredients need to be procured for making Lemongrass Olive Tea. In conclusion, this particular herbal tea is impressively light with a zesty aftertaste and aforementioned lemongrass health and medicinal benefits. Read more: http://bit.ly/2Ess9rz


AprilReese
5/3/2016 2:06:04 AM

The best way is to do a lab test. At the end of the day lemongrass is just food, so drink it with your meds. Then on the 7th day and a month after, do the lab test and give it to your physician. Allow him/her to make the decision of removing meds based on the results. Lemongrass Hydrosol is the best thing I have tested.http://goldingrass.com/traditional.htm







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