DIY





Comfrey Medicinal Uses: The Herbalist's Notebook

This seasonal guide to medicinal herbs highlights the uses, collection, and dosages of comfrey.

| June/July 1992

Comfrey, Symphytum officinale

Every year comfrey leaves are a main ingredient in a healing salve we use for wounds, scratches, sunburn and a variety of other skin irritations experienced in a typically busy summer. And the leaves and roots go into tea along with other herbs for coughs and congestion—and especially for an asthma tea for my daughter.

Several years ago, when I was both working and going to school, I started to develop ulcer symptoms. Comfrey tea became part of my daily regimen and within just a few weeks, all my symptoms were gone. It's hard to imagine our home medicine chest without comfrey in one form or another.

Comfrey Medicinal Uses

Comfrey has several medicinal actions. It is known as a vulnerary and as an astringent. These properties make it useful in the healing of minor wounds, both internal and external. Comfrey can be used for minor injuries of the skin, where it will work to increase cell production, causing wounds to heal over rapidly. It can be used internally for stomach and duodenal ulcers, where it will have the same effect. Comfrey is also demulcent, producing a mucilage that coats and soothes irritated tissues. It will help reduce inflammation, and at the same time lessen scarring.

Comfrey also has expectorant properties and has a relaxing effect on the respiratory membranes. Since it helps relax and soothe membranes, it is useful in coughs, asthma, and bronchitis. As an astringent, comfrey can also help control slow bleeding, as in the case of ulcers.



Comfrey Plant Description

Comfrey is a tall, rough-leaved plant found growing in waste places and old fields. It can become a nuisance since it reproduces rapidly—even from just a tiny bit of root.

Comfrey roots grow deep in the soil and are covered with a dark brown bark that reveals a white inner core when cut. The stems and leaves are covered with coarse, bristly hairs. Leaves are large near the bottom of the plants, up to 12 inches long, and get smaller toward the top. The stalks of lower leaves are long, and when torn, they produce tough and rubbery fibers that stretch before tearing. The leaves are lance- or oval-shaped, with softly pointed tips. They occur alternately along the stem and have simple, smooth margins. Generally, the leaves, stems, and roots all produce a extremely mucilaginous juice when broken. Plant height is up to 3 or 4 feet.

Esperantistka
6/10/2018 4:21:54 PM

I have a lot of Russian Comfrey plants (already mighty ones) and I can sell Comfrey roots. Please see my son's website ( www.plantsale.weebly.com) which he built as student project and he uses it to fund-raise money to pay for his tuition in GTC. Shipping is $6.99 for the flat rate small box. "A natural salve option to use instead of conventional ones like Neosporin. A Healing Salve… I’m not a fan of Neosporin because it's made with petroleum jelly and there are natural options that work just as well. My homemade healing salve (or “boo-boo lotion”, according to the kids) is helpful on cuts, bruises, stings, poison ivy and skin irritations. It also helps diaper rash and baby skin irritations - just don’t use with cloth diapers or line them first. It’s easy to make and some of the ingredients even grow in your front yard during the summer… One of the herbs I use is Plantain, which grows in most parts of the country and is great for the skin. Most people just know it as a common garden weed. This salve is naturally antibiotic, anti-inflammatory, anti-fungal, and astringent. It also doesn’t contain petroleum and never goes bad, so I make it in big batches, but you can reduce the size if needed. I always keep this on hand while gardening for skin irritations and bug bites. Healing Salve Ingredients 2 cups olive oil or almond oil 1/4 cup beeswax pastilles 1 tsp echinacea root (optional) 2 Tbsp dried comfrey leaf 2 Tbsp dried plantain leaf (herb-not banana!) 1 Tbsp dried calendula flowers (optional) 1 tsp dried yarrow flowers (optional) 1 tsp dried rosemary leaf (optional) Healing Salve Instructions Infuse the herbs into the olive oil. There are two ways to do this. You can either combine the herbs and the olive oil in a jar with an airtight lid and leave 3-4 weeks, shaking daily OR heat the herbs and olive oil over low/low heat in a double boiler for 3 hours (low heat!) until the oil is very green. Strain her herbs out of the oil by pouring through a cheesecloth. Let all the oil drip out and then squeeze the herbs to get the remaining oil out. Discard the herbs. Heat the infused oil in a double boiler with the beeswax until melted and mixed. Pour into small tins, glass jars or lip chap tubes and use on bites, stings, cuts, poison ivy, diaper rash or other wounds as needed.


Esperantistka
6/10/2018 4:21:07 PM

I have a lot of Russian Comfrey plants (already mighty ones) and I can sell Comfrey roots. Please see my son's website ( www.plantsale.weebly.com ) which he built as student project and he uses it to fundraise money to pay for his tuition in GTC. Shipping is $6.99 for the flat rate small box. "Comfrey leaves are a main ingredient in a healing salve we use for wounds, scratches, sunburn and a variety of other skin irritations experienced in a typically busy summer. And the leaves and roots go into tea along with other herbs for coughs and congestion—and especially for an asthma tea. Several years ago, when I was both working and going to school, I started to develop ulcer symptoms. Comfrey tea became part of my daily regimen and within just a few weeks, all my symptoms were gone. It's hard to imagine our home medicine chest without comfrey in one form or another. Comfrey Medicinal Uses Comfrey has several medicinal actions. It is known as a vulnerary and as an astringent. These properties make it useful in the healing of minor wounds, both internal and external. Comfrey can be used for minor injuries of the skin, where it will work to increase cell production, causing wounds to heal over rapidly. It can be used internally for stomach and duodenal ulcers, where it will have the same effect. Comfrey is also demulcent, producing a mucilage that coats and soothes irritated tissues. It will help reduce inflammation, and at the same time lessen scarring. Comfrey also has expectorant properties and has a relaxing effect on the respiratory membranes. Since it helps relax and soothe membranes, it is useful in coughs, asthma, and bronchitis. As an astringent, comfrey can also help control slow bleeding, as in the case of ulcers. Comfrey Plant Description Comfrey is a tall, rough-leaved plant found growing in waste places and old fields. It can become a nuisance since it reproduces rapidly—even from just a tiny bit of root. Comfrey roots grow deep in the soil and are covered with a dark brown bark that reveals a white inner core when cut. The stems and leaves are covered with coarse, bristly hairs. Leaves are large near the bottom of the plants, up to 12 inches long, and get smaller toward the top. The stalks of lower leaves are long, and when torn, they produce tough and rubbery fibers that stretch before tearing. The leaves are lance- or oval-shaped, with softly pointed tips. They occur alternately along the stem and have simple, smooth margins. Generally, the leaves, stems, and roots all produce a extremely mucilaginous juice when broken. Plant height is up to 3 or 4 feet." ..."I have heard of at least one woman who uses Comfrey regularly who says that only one cup of tea should be made and that cup is to be drank throughout the day. Three to four times a day." "A natural salve option to use instead of conventional ones like Neosporin. A Healing Salve… I’m not a fan of Neosporin because it's made with petroleum jelly and there are natural options that work just as well. My homemade healing salve (or “boo-boo lotion”, according to the kids) is helpful on cuts, bruises, stings, poison ivy and skin irritations. It also helps diaper rash and baby skin irritations - just don’t use with cloth diapers or line them first. It’s easy to make and some of the ingredients even grow in your front yard during the summer… One of the herbs I use is Plantain, which grows in most parts of the country and is great for the skin. Most people just know it as a common garden weed. This salve is naturally antibiotic, anti-inflammatory, anti-fungal, and astringent. It also doesn’t contain petroleum and never goes bad, so I make it in big batches, but you can reduce the size if needed. I always keep this on hand while gardening for skin irritations and bug bites. Healing Salve Ingredients 2 cups olive oil or almond oil 1/4 cup beeswax pastilles 1 tsp echinacea root (optional) 2 Tbsp dried comfrey leaf 2 Tbsp dried plantain leaf (herb-not banana!) 1 Tbsp dried calendula flowers (optional) 1 tsp dried yarrow flowers (optional) 1 tsp dried rosemary leaf (optional) Healing Salve Instructions Infuse the herbs into the olive oil. There are two ways to do this. You can either combine the herbs and the olive oil in a jar with an airtight lid and leave 3-4 weeks, shaking daily OR heat the herbs and olive oil over low/low heat in a double boiler for 3 hours (low heat!) until the oil is very green. Strain her herbs out of the oil by pouring through a cheesecloth. Let all the oil drip out and then squeeze the herbs to get the remaining oil out. Discard the herbs. Heat the infused oil in a double boiler with the beeswax until melted and mixed. Pour into small tins, glass jars or lip chap tubes and use on bites, stings, cuts, poison ivy, diaper rash or other wounds as needed. https://wellnessmama.com/3520/homemade-healing-salve/


Esperantistka
6/10/2018 4:21:06 PM

I have a lot of Russian Comfrey plants (already mighty ones) and I can sell Comfrey roots. Please see my son's website ( www.plantsale.weebly.com) which he built as student project and he uses it to fund-raise money to pay for his tuition in GTC. Shipping is $6.99 for the flat rate small box. "A natural salve option to use instead of conventional ones like Neosporin. A Healing Salve… I’m not a fan of Neosporin because it's made with petroleum jelly and there are natural options that work just as well. My homemade healing salve (or “boo-boo lotion”, according to the kids) is helpful on cuts, bruises, stings, poison ivy and skin irritations. It also helps diaper rash and baby skin irritations - just don’t use with cloth diapers or line them first. It’s easy to make and some of the ingredients even grow in your front yard during the summer… One of the herbs I use is Plantain, which grows in most parts of the country and is great for the skin. Most people just know it as a common garden weed. This salve is naturally antibiotic, anti-inflammatory, anti-fungal, and astringent. It also doesn’t contain petroleum and never goes bad, so I make it in big batches, but you can reduce the size if needed. I always keep this on hand while gardening for skin irritations and bug bites. Healing Salve Ingredients 2 cups olive oil or almond oil 1/4 cup beeswax pastilles 1 tsp echinacea root (optional) 2 Tbsp dried comfrey leaf 2 Tbsp dried plantain leaf (herb-not banana!) 1 Tbsp dried calendula flowers (optional) 1 tsp dried yarrow flowers (optional) 1 tsp dried rosemary leaf (optional) Healing Salve Instructions Infuse the herbs into the olive oil. There are two ways to do this. You can either combine the herbs and the olive oil in a jar with an airtight lid and leave 3-4 weeks, shaking daily OR heat the herbs and olive oil over low/low heat in a double boiler for 3 hours (low heat!) until the oil is very green. Strain her herbs out of the oil by pouring through a cheesecloth. Let all the oil drip out and then squeeze the herbs to get the remaining oil out. Discard the herbs. Heat the infused oil in a double boiler with the beeswax until melted and mixed. Pour into small tins, glass jars or lip chap tubes and use on bites, stings, cuts, poison ivy, diaper rash or other wounds as needed.







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