The Old Time Farm Magazines: Growing Cauliflower, Raising Geese, and Making Omelets

Read articles from old farm magazines that give advice on growing cauliflower, raising geese, and making omelets.


| January/February 1975



OMELET

Like a healthy omelet to start your day?  Try these old-time farm magazines for omelet making tips and other homesteading tips.

PHOTO: FOTOLIA/LILYANA VYNOGRADOVA

Here are two more pages of old-timey information taken from issues of Successful Farming, The Farm Journal and The Inland Farmer dated 1898 to 1914.  

Growing Cauliflower for Home Garden

by C. H. BREWER, NEW JERSEY 

I have tried several of the so-called early varieties, but find that the best strains of selected Urfurt and Snowball give most satisfactory results. Last season from plants set April 18, I cut fine heads In June, some measuring 27 Inches In circumference. The season was not a favorable one, being very dry, and cauliflower, to do best, requires plenty of water. These were grown in a small way for home use. It is not a difficult task to water 60 or 100 plants, if they need it.

Cauliflower requires rich soil, and as mine is not, at present, of that type I have used a mixture of one-third hen manure and two-thirds horse manure and sifted coal ashes, thoroughly composted. I use one shovelful to three hills, before setting the plants. I give good cultivation and, at time of second hoeing, scatter around each plant a tablespoonful of nitrate of soda and hoe it In. Last spring, I set 400 plants. Nearly every one produced a fine head. The quality of the seed used is an important factor in success. I purchased seed one year at 10 cents per package and it proved the dearest I ever bought. I did not get a decent head from 200 plants. Right beside that plot I set some plants grown from seed that cost me 25 cents per package for 100 seeds. Every plant produced a fine head. Set out only strong, vigorous plants.

Keeping Geese for Profit

Under the right conditions geese give better returns than any other poultry. By nature geese are more like a sheep or cow in habit of feeding than like poultry. They are essentially grazing animals and too much grain will spoil them. Pure air Is of even more Importance to geese than to cattle. They will not thrive if shut up in buildings. If you have not a good pasture, do not try to keep geese, or at least to raise many goslings. They can, however, be kept in yards, if fed an abundance of fodder corn, green rape, clover or other green feed, but this adds greatly to the expense.

While green pasture is important for maintaining old geese, it is indispensable food for young goslings. They must have fresh, tender grass In abundance at all times during the day, from the first day they eat to the time they are well feathered and have grown their wings. After that, those intended for market may be penned and fed green stuff and grain, but those intended for breeding should continue to have pasture and free range. If a large flock is raised, quite a. pasture is needed to sustain them. It takes geese almost as long to reach full development as it does cattle or sheep, but they remain profitable for many years. Yearling geese are very poor breeders, two-year-olds are better, and they only reach their best at three years of age.





mother earth news fair

MOTHER EARTH NEWS FAIR

Feb. 17-18, 2018
Belton, Texas

More than 150 workshops, great deals from more than 200 exhibitors, off-stage demos, hands-on workshops, and great food!

LEARN MORE