Handling Newborn Bunnies, Herbal Dandruff Cure, a Natural Pincushion And More Country Lore

Tips from our readers.


| March/April 1984





With spring just around the bend, it won't be long before we will again be playing host to lots of uninvited insect guests. And, among these, wasps can be especially troublesome . . . or downright nasty! So let's look at a triad of suggestions offered by (and for) MOTHER EARTH NEWS readers.

The first tip comes from Robert Grinarml of Cambridge Springs, Pennsylvania. Bob says that folks whose nearby neighbors would not be disturbed by the sound of a shotgun blast can literally "blow" wasp nests out of hard-to-reach places (like second-story eaves) . . . and do it from a wasp-safe distance. Bob says, "Cut about an eighth of an inch off the top of a shotgun shell and dump out the pellets. Now, just load up your trusty scattergun with the de-shotted shell and blast the offending nest. The wadding (the paper or plastic material that separates the shot from the powder) will knock the nest down without doing any damage to your house."

But Mr. Grinarml goes on to caution, "A hasty retreat may be in order, though, if you score a direct hit on an occupied nest!"


Non gunners might be interested in the method Dave Kooyers of Boonville, California uses to rid his outbuildings of hornets. "I bought a five-pound bag of `burning' sulfur at the local farm supply store," Dave reports, "and carted it home. When hornets set up in my sheds, I crumple some paper into the bottom of an empty coffee can and dump about half a cup of sulfur on top of the paper. Next, I place the can in an old skillet and set the frypan on the floor of the hornet-infested building. After making sure that nothing burnable is nearby, I light the paper, close the door, and stay away from the building for a day or more (humans can't stand the noxious sulfur fumes any more than hornets can!).

"The smoke fumes will drive out all bugs and keep them away long after the odor has disappeared."


A third Hymenoptera -fighting strategy was submitted by Ross Westergaard of Surrey, British Columbia. Our Canadian friend writes, "The town houses in our neighborhood are flat-roofed, with only a two-foot crawl space for an attic. Wasps gained access to one of these spaces through a small hole, and pretty soon over 200 of them had set up housekeeping! Now I'm usually one to live and let live, but these flying critters weren't about to hold up their end of that bargain. In fact, they got so pugnacious that it was dangerous to step outside the front door or open the upstairs windows.





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