Living Off Grid - Operating Our Solar Power System - Part 2


| 8/9/2012 8:53:11 AM


labeled system In Part 1 we looked at the different components of a solar power system and what their purpose is. In Part 2 we discuss the actual hands on management of those components.

It sounds like the system operates by itself once it is set up, other than a little battery maintenance. That’s true but the system is not as efficient as it can be when it runs on “automatic." What do I mean by efficiency?

By managing a few things myself I can extend the life of my batteries and backup generator and keep the fuel costs for the generator down.

The inverter is programmed to turn the generator on when the batteries go down to 60 percent capacity. That is fine for when we aren’t home but the rest of the time I choose to start the generator when my batteries are at 70 percent. I choose when to start the generator and when to turn it off. I choose the most opportune time to pump water which takes a lot of power. If the pump comes on automatically at night and I catch it on the monitor, I will go out to the panel and turn it off if I know it is going to be a sunny day tomorrow and can use the sun to pump rather than my reserve battery power.

Whether the sun or your generator charges batteries the following will occur:
1. Bulk charge – the batteries will accept the maximum charge possible
2. Absorb charge – in this mode the batteries will only accept a partial charge. They do this to protect themselves for reasons over my head. It’s enough for me to understand that they need to do it. I think it is kind of like eating. You don’t eat your whole meal in one bite. You take many bites but end up the same – full.
3. Float – a trickle charge to just maintain the batteries at 100 percent.



generators large and smallIt is harmful to charge the batteries too fast or overcharge them. I am more efficient at generator use than the inverter. When my generator is charging it might be putting out as much as 140 amps. That is fine in bulk charge but when the inverter slows down the amperage to 60 amps (absorb mode) then the generator is still running at full capacity using fuel but not sending all of the amps to the batteries. That is inefficient. When they get into absorb mode I may choose to go hook up my smaller generator to charge with which only puts out about 45 amps.





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