A Multi-Pronged Approach for Fending Off Fleamageddon


| 9/12/2017 9:17:00 AM


Tags: cedarcide, fleas, flea traps, cedar oil, non-toxic insect prevention, peppermint oil, eugenol, bed bugs, Blythe Pelham, Ohio,

WindaMatisse1

Granted, living with 15 feline furbabies (12 indoor, 3 outdoor) isn’t a normal state of affairs for most households. However, most of us with furball family members have had to deal with fleas at one time or another. Depending on where you live, this can present a year-round problem.

We suspect that basement mice brought the first fleas in with them though we may also have carried a few in from the garden on our pant legs and socks. With a milder winter last year, I was afraid the flea situation might become worse than usual. I was not expecting to have to go to war.

We started out the season with an habitual dosing of our cats with Frontline Combo (not an inexpensive solution with so many cats) even though we both feel badly about assaulting our pets with these chemicals. In the past, we believed it helped to keep us flea-free. While the cats obviously don’t like feeling ill on the day they are dosed, they do enjoy life without being constantly bitten. Unfortunately, the effectiveness only seems to last for 7 to 10 days. Since redosing isn’t recommended for 6 weeks, that leaves more than 4 weeks of footloose and fancy freedom for the fleas—not good.

My husband began researching alternatives when an impending fleamageddon became clear. We started by adding non-toxic flea traps. We used both Aspectek and Victor brands. We haven’t noticed a difference in performance, though the Victor is a little easier to assemble. Plan on periodically replacing lights. We bought green lights to try since some people mentioned they are more attractive to fleas. They seem to work about the same.GatheredFleas2

Next, we tried Vet’s Best Flea + Tick Home Spray. This enabled us to spray carpeted areas that seemed to be particularly popular for flea parties. The drawbacks to this product are that it makes me cough and it cannot be used on the animals themselves. However, I still use it because I like to alternate products in order to foil the pesky fleas.

Our preferred sprays are Cedarcide Original and their 3% solution (D.A.S. Domestic Animal Spray). These can be sprayed on carpet, upholstery, bedding, and pets (with care). They can also be applied with a special brush. I’m not a fan of the smell of this spray but it’s a temporary drawback because I’m a total fan of the job it’s done in abating our infestation. I can spray it liberally without worrying about harming our cats or ourselves while it kills fleas dead.

nana-x6
10/1/2017 9:55:02 AM

Food-grade Diatomaceous Earth would do the job. You might want to check out this article and there are many, many more. https://richsoil.com/diatomaceous-earth.jsp


nanax6
10/1/2017 9:55:00 AM

Food-grade Diatomaceous Earth would do the job. You might want to check out this article and there are many, many more. https://richsoil.com/diatomaceous-earth.jsp


nanax6
10/1/2017 9:46:24 AM

Food-grade Diatomaceous Earth would do the job. You might want to check out this article and there are many, many more. https://richsoil.com/diatomaceous-earth.jsp


liliorchid
9/29/2017 3:14:10 AM

meghanmacrhyann thanks for the tips on the out of country online source. Did u use the canadavet.com site? I foster and volunteer with rescue so we are always looking to lower med costs.


miksict
9/28/2017 9:27:52 AM

Used a combination.... diatomaceous earth on bedding indoors and out, and sprinkled on the dog; sprayed carpets with a permithium based spray; and wiped dog down with apple cider vinegar, do it outside for fleas left the dog while I was doing it (doesn't necessarily kill them but gives instant relief)!


marcia.kirschbaum
9/28/2017 12:14:54 AM

I soak citrus peels in apple cider vinegar, in a 1 gallon glass jar. Fill the jar about 1/2 way with vinegar and add any type of citrus peels over the course of a week. strain the infused liquid into a spray bottle for treating carpet, bedding and stop treating on the animals themselves. I have dogs, not cats, but in either case you can use the solution as a final leave-on rinse after baths or just sponge it on their fur once a week. The oils from citrus (especially orange) peels contain a powerful chemical called linalool that is toxic to fleas, but not to pets or humans. Fleas hate the smell of vinegar and keeps them away between treatments. I also use Baltic Amber collars and they work very well. Actually, this summer I rarely needed to use the vinegar solution. The Baltic Amber collars did the work for me. I got mine on Amazon. For a large dog, the collar was $28. and it lasts for an entire year with no chemicals or side effects.


janeryan
9/27/2017 6:02:28 PM

I also have used 20-Mule Team Borax sprinkled all over the carpets, worked in with a broom, my feet, etc., and even left it for several days. Vacuuming often also helps. The diatomaceous earth can be sprinkled too, but I found these bothersome to the aesthetics of my home.


janeann3797
9/27/2017 6:02:26 PM

I devised a counterattack utilizing the fact that fleas are attracted to carbon dioxide, what we exhale, which indicates to them that a blood meal is nearby. Both dry ice and a warm yeast solution give off and attract the buggers. I used my extra large Italian spaghetti bowl and in one case placed my crockpot on low in the center with a bit of flour in it. I built up a nice moat of diatomaceous earth around it in the bowl and placed a nightlight in the dirt. When I left for the day I turned off all lights except the nightlight. You could see the tiny holes in the dirt where they tried to get to the 'blood meal' and fell short. Oops! Alternatively, place a block of dry ice in a box and place that in the center instead of the crockpot. Jane 2, Fleas 0. Jane Ryan


cynde123
9/27/2017 2:44:34 PM

Do this instead of the trap: Place a dinner plate on the floor in a safe area where it won't trip people or be a fire hazard. Add liquid dish detergent. Place a lighted short votive candle or other SHORT oil wick burner in the center--it must be SHORT to work. You might need to refresh to liquid detergent or add a little water occasionally. This will trap adult fleas without having to buy traps. You will still need to use some other form of abatement to break the cycle, but you will reduce annoying adult fleas.


cyndezzz123
9/27/2017 2:44:20 PM

Do this instead of the trap: Place a dinner plate on the floor in a safe area where it won't trip people or be a fire hazard. Add liquid dish detergent. Place a lighted short votive candle or other SHORT oil wick burner in the center--it must be SHORT to work. You might need to refresh to liquid detergent or add a little water occasionally. This will trap adult fleas without having to buy traps. You will still need to use some other form of abatement to break the cycle, but you will reduce annoying adult fleas.


cynde123
9/27/2017 2:36:56 PM

I have tried several times to get this to post, hope this works: Do this instead of the trap: Place a dinner plate on the floor in a safe area where it won't trip people or be a fire hazard. Add liquid dish detergent. Place a lighted short votive candle or other SHORT oil wick burner in the center--it must be SHORT to work. You might need to refresh to liquid detergent or add a little water occasionally. This will trap adult fleas without having to buy traps. You will still need to use some other form of abatement to break the cycle, but you will reduce annoying adult fleas.


cyndezzz123
9/27/2017 2:36:41 PM

Do this instead of the trap: Place a dinner plate on the floor in a safe area where it won't trip people or be a fire hazard. Add liquid dish detergent. Place a lighted short votive candle or other SHORT oil wick burner in the center--it must be SHORT to work. You might need to refresh to liquid detergent or add a little water occasionally. This will trap adult fleas without having to buy traps. You will still need to use some other form of abatement to break the cycle, but you will reduce annoying adult fleas.


cynde123
9/27/2017 2:26:05 PM

Do this instead of the trap: Place a dinner plate on the floor in a safe area where it won't trip people or be a fire hazard. Add liquid dish detergent. Place a lighted short votive candle or other SHORT oil wick burner in the center--it must be SHORT to work. You might need to refresh to liquid detergent or add a little water occasionally. This will trap adult fleas without having to buy traps. You will still need to use some other form of abatement to break the cycle, but you will reduce annoying adult fleas.


cyndezzz123
9/27/2017 2:25:29 PM

Those traps are just an added cost. You CAN trap them just as easily by using a dinner plate placed on the floor in a safe area where it won't be tripped over or start a fire, fill it with liquid dish detergent, put a lighted votive or other short candle or short wick burning oil--it must be SHORT to work. The heat attracts the adult fleas, which get trapped in the liquid and can't get away. You might need to add a little water occasionally to keep the detergent liquid, or add more liquid detergent. This method works to trap adult fleas, you will still need to do some kind of abatement to stop the cycle, but at least you can do this to save money on traps and reduce the adult fleas.


peggyb
9/27/2017 1:32:42 PM

Apologies if this comes through multiple times - ME is not showing that I have posted anything... organic food grade DT Earth is great and cheap - but be careful, it's very drying to their skin. Easily applied to carpets with a flour sifter. Wear a light weight mask when applying so you don't inhale the dust. And yes - add to food for deworming (fyi - great for chickens also!)


peggyb
9/27/2017 1:32:12 PM

organic food grade DT Earth is great and cheap - but be careful, it's very drying to their skin. Easily applied to carpets with a flour sifter. Wear a light weight mask when applying so you don't inhale the dust. And yes - add to food for deworming (fyi - great for chickens also!)


brewstout
9/27/2017 1:32:10 PM

organic food grade DT Earth is great and cheap - but be careful, it's very drying to their skin. Easily applied to carpets with a flour sifter. Wear a light weight mask when applying so you don't inhale the dust. And yes - add to food for deworming (fyi - great for chickens also!)


rjriley
9/27/2017 11:02:41 AM

I use food grade diatomaceous earth, sprinkle it on their fur and then give them a good scratching to work it in. It is cheap and effective.


rjriley
9/27/2017 11:02:40 AM

I use food grade diatomaceous earth, sprinkle it on their fur and then give them a good scratching to work it in. It is safe, cheap and effective.


rjriley
9/27/2017 11:02:20 AM

I use food grade diatomaceous earth, sprinkle it on their fur and then give them a good scratching to work it in. It is safe, cheap and effective.


rjriley
9/27/2017 11:02:02 AM

I use food grade diatomaceous earth, sprinkle it on their fur and then give them a good scratching to work it in. It is safe, cheap and effective.


rjriley
9/27/2017 11:01:48 AM

I use food grade diatomaceous earth, sprinkle it on their fur and then give them a good scratching to work it in. It is safe, cheap and effective.


meghanmacrhyann
9/27/2017 9:24:22 AM

I use Revolution (Selamectin) on my ten cats that have access to indoors and outdoors. I don't have carpets in the downstairs, only the bedrooms upstairs, but I've not seen any fleas in the house - ever. I buy the Revolution for large dogs (dog strength is double so you need even less) and put it into a ceramic dish and suck up 3 mg into syringes and dose all the cats on the back of their necks about once a month (if you do this, know it evaporates super quickly so move fast and cap the syringes until you have kitty with you). It also takes care of internal parasites and ear mites and they've never become sick. It is costly but worth it to me. You can buy Revolution without a prescription if you use an out-of-country supplier (I use Canada Vet). I can't afford to use it for the dogs too so they get the eight-month collars (found a low-cost provider out of Poland) which have worked just fine for me. In Washington, I could dose the cats every two or even three months but here in Ohio, I have to do them monthly - one cat got fleas on her but, thankfully, she was staying outside at that time (as she only likes to come in during winter) but it was enough to make me realize that fleas are more prevalent here so I don't risk stretching it anymore - once a month - except during the cold months - but the way I do it it's about $50 a month for all 10 cats and two dogs and I know there aren't ANY parasites on them and they don't seem to mind at all. I also use diatomaceous earth for the dog's internal parasites - just add it to their food to kill any worms they may contact.


donnahankinson
9/27/2017 8:54:56 AM

I use course salt and baking soda on my carpets. It dehydrates the fleas. I leave it on for an hour or more then vacuum.


cocosmomy
9/27/2017 8:54:54 AM

I have used salt and baking soda on my carpets. Leave it on for an hour or more, it dehydrates the fleas and keeps your animals safe too.





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