Feeding the Pig: The Problem with Homegrown Arts Organizations

It costs the average musician upwards of $1,000 to be a member of most music trade groups, pay for conference fees, travel, and get hotel rooms and meals. That is more than most musicians make in a year. If it costs more to be part of the garden than the garden can provide, the farmer needs to make a choice: Abandon the garden or get rid of the pig.

Nevermind the Politics, Forests Can Help Cool the Planet

Forestry and climate change are complex and emotionally charged issues. In this post, we focus on the forests themselves and how they can contribute to global cooling when forest management practices are adjusted through the incentives in the multi-billion dollar carbon credit programs being launched.

How to Relocate Spiders

Spiders are beneficial arachnids, meaning they have eight legs. They can be found in or near a home. Relocating spiders to a more appropriate place is a much wiser idea than killing them when they're in our way.

Encounters with Coyotes in the Past and Present

Coyotes live among us just as they have with our Native Peoples in the past. But unlike our Native Peoples understanding and respect of coyotes, our present day culture has little knowledge, and this greatly takes away from all the positive experiences we can have with America’s wild canine.

Salvaging Campus Trees for Education

Indiana University of Pennsylvania's groundbreaking "Harvest to Use" program uses a portable sawmill to salvage campus trees for education and community projects.

Coyote and Fox and Mesopredator Release

What changes a predator’s relationship with your farm? Relationships are two-sided, and human behavior has much to do with our relationships with predators. Here are two real-life stories about just that.

Botanical Wonders Abound in West Virginia’s ‘Cranberry Glades’

The Cranberry Glades are situated within the Monongahela National Forest, which comprises almost 1 million acres of land, making it the third largest national forest east of the Rocky Mountains. Within The Glades are many natural areas and attractions such as the “Cranberry Glades Botanical Area.” This 750-acre preserve is home to many unusual plants, and this is where you’ll find “the bogs.”

Dealing with Packrats

Even though we live remotely in the mountains with bear, coyote, mountain lion, deer, elk, and bobcats, the lowly little packrat may be the most dangerous critter we face. Here's how we deal with packrats on our remote homestead.

Ecotourism in Gatlinburg, Tennessee, Part 2

As much inspired by the mountains, rivers and forests as serving the needs of the droves of visitors attracted to the Great Smoky Mountains National Park every year, Gatlinburg's arts and craft community, plus many of the hotels and restaurants, offer nourishment for the mind, body and soul.

Ecotourism in Gatlinburg, Tennessee, Part 1

Cradled by the half-million-acre Great Smoky Mountains National Park, Gatlinburg, Tennessee, can be a perfect, if not also eco-luxurious, base camp, a cornucopia of discoveries for the arts and craft crowd, or a wacky diversionary stop on the way to or from an entrance to the most visited national parks in the United States.

How to Read Pet Food Labels

Stumped by the confusing keywords that litter the ingredient lists of your companion’s kibble? Learn how to read pet food labels and which ingredients to avoid to keep your furry friend healthy.

Finding Solace in the Garden

A day full of learning and fun created the perfect respite to my recent turmoil about lawn ordinances and greater world tragedies. There are so many friends and animal family that I have yet to discover—I will hold onto this day as a lovely treasure of proof that there are people who understand and walk similar paths.

The Grasses are Alive and Teeming with Wildlife

Meet some of our outdoor family members as I work to comply with the lawn ordinances being forced upon us. Hopefully, more of them are still alive and are adapting to something more akin to cave dwelling than open-forested lands.

Forestry, Global Warming, and the Multi-Billion-Dollar Carbon-Credit Grab

Most forests are working forests. They are cut regularly for lumber production and other uses. Only 12.7% of the earth's forests are protected. Wood is carbon. Carbon volumes sequestered in the woods need to multiply to significantly contribute to global cooling. Without this, the carbon credit market is mostly wasted as a tool for significant global cooling. We still have time to save our forests.

What to Do with Sludge

Sewage and industrial sludge is being managed as a liability. Current outdated regulations and technologies focus on the least-expensive means of the sludge disposal. Sludge management needs to be redirected toward the recovery of energy and chemicals embedded in the sludge and guided by the principals based on the current scientific findings and technology. Environmental and demographic considerations need to play an important role in this new approach geared toward sustainable and energy-efficient waste management practices.

Coyote America: A Natural and Supernatural History

An understanding our human history teaches us much about our present day perspectives and our behaviors that manifest those perspectives. We can observe this in all facets of our human society, and it is most poignantly made aware to us in Dan Flores’ newly published book, Coyote America: A Natural and Supernatural History. Read on!

An Ecotourism Escape to Elkhart Lake, Wisconsin

Come early or linger for a few days after the MOTHER EARTH NEWS FAIR and cool off at Elkhart Lake. Explore some of the spectacular natural areas, savor farm-to-table meals, or relax at an eco-spa at the Osthoff Resort.

Cougars Return to Their Homeland

Cougars, our American lion, historically have been the most widespread large carnivore of both North and South America. After being almost systematically annihilated from our continent by those who came before us, our big cat is making heroic attempts to return to their lost homeland. Will we let them?

Biosolids or Biohazard? Part 2

A precedent setting legal battle is being played in Virginia's countryside. Local business owner is seeking county's permit to store and process municipal and industrial sludge inside a residential neighborhood. If he is allowed to build the biosolids processing facility - health and the quality of life of hundreds of local residents will be compromised and the permit could mean a green light to other similar enterprises mushrooming in rural areas.

The Airborne Bestiary

When we think of the atmosphere, we might assume it is mostly a lifeless place. Boy, are we wrong.

Home Radon Detection and Mitigation

Radon is colorless, odorless, and invisible but it can give you lung cancer. Learn to test for radon in your home and techniques to mitigate its impacts.

Ecotourism in San Diego, Part 2

Surprisingly, the San Diego area is home to one of the largest collections of small farms in any county in America. Green travel is boosted by these farmers supplying the farmers' markets and farm-to-table restaurants. There's a few lodging options for the eco-minded, too.

Oregon Company Salvages Urban Timber

After seeing beautiful trees in Oregon going to waste, Seth Filippo realized the Pacific Northwest had a huge underutilized resource in urban wood.

Biosolids or Biohazard?

Meet Carla Jordan, the resident of a rural county of Spotsylvania, VA. This a true story of how land application of biosolids affected Carla's life and how she decided to fight for the health and welfare of her family and her community.

We Live on Planet Mother

Land-based people have a global culture of relationship with nature. This powerful experience of interconnection is extremely valuable too turn us away from the colonized food system.

Activists Fight Biosolids Land Application

Caroline Snyder, Ph.D.,is Professor Emeritus of the College of Liberal Arts at the Rochester Institute of Technology. For the last 20 years she has researched the politics and science of using biosolids and industrial residuals as an agricultural "fertilizer". She founded Citizens for Sludge-Free Land and is a charter member of the Union of Concerned Scientists. Here, Dr Snyder shares with us her views on the role of anti-sludge activists.

A Fairy's-Eye View of My Garden

I recently spent time visiting the micro worlds of my garden. It always thrills me to do such a thing and I often find surprises.

Sludge Train: Toxic Biosolids Permitted in Virginia

The burden of municipal and industrial waste disposal is transformed into a commercial enterprise, with the careless disregard for growing concerns over the risks it poses to the human and animal health and to the natural environment.

Ecotourism Fun in San Diego

With temperatures typically in the 70s or 80s and plentiful sunshine, there’s rarely a day you can’t catch the sunset, go for a ocean kayak trip or bike some of the hundreds of miles of bike trails or pathways that weave through San Diego.

Garden Friendship with a Yellow Agriope Spider

I have a long-standing fear and dislike of spiders — especially big ones. You could say I was not a likely candidate for conversion to a spider lover. This story is about the Yellow Agriope spider I found in my tomato plant and the unlikely garden friendship we developed.

A Murmuration of Starlings

An examination of flocking behavior in starlings and the beauty and mystery we see when those flocks, or “murmurations” are extraordinarily large and active. Also an inquiry into the 500-year-old history of collective nouns for groups of animals.

The Sludging of Rural Communities

Agricultural use of sludge is not only detrimental to human health, but it also damages the social fabric of rural communities all across the country. Federal and state regulations are ill prepared to address medical, social and environmental consequences of this disastrous practice.

Introducing the Farming With Carnivores Network

This blog post introduces you to the new educational website www.FarmingwithCarnivoresNetwork.com. It is a collaborative effort of leading farmers, experts on guardian animals and fencing, and biologists whose work focuses on carnivores. Its purpose is to help create a farming of the future by sharing knowledge and experience with each other.

MOTHER EARTH NEWS: April/May 2016

The April/May 2016 issue of MOTHER EARTH NEWS features articles about breeding heritage flocks, growing rare root crops, building your own utility knife, making your own nontoxic laundry soap, solar myths, earthworms, and much, much more.

Create a Wildlife Condominium in Your Own Backyard

Building your own wildlife habitat in the style of a brush pile can be fun and easy. It can also help with several problems at once—where to dispose of clippings and branches, how to provide shelter for wildlife, and how to lower our carbon footprint are all solved in this one simple addition to your garden.

The Realities of Hunting

An ethical hunter makes a point to explain what hunting is to those who have never done it.

A Tree-Hugger Reflection on Sludge

Farmers opting for biosolids applications on their farmland believe that this is a safe and natural way to fertilize the soil. Oftentimes they see local anti-biosolids activists as the adversaries, not realizing that the truth is quite the opposite. There is a mounting body of scientific and medical evidence that the practice of biosolids land application is detrimental to human health and constitutes an environmental factor contributing to many chronic conditions. Farmers, their families and neighbors are often first to suffer the consequences.

A Successful, Sustainable Forest

By managing his family's forestland with natural and environmentally friendly practices, Jim Birkemeier has created a sustainable forest model that is being taught and implemented all over the world.

Inspiring Eco-Consciousness in Kids Without a Load of Eco-Guilt

How do you talk to young children about caring for the environment without loading them with guilt? Here are five environmental education suggestions that create natural opportunities for kids to learn about what they can do to be immersed in nature and help our planet.

Using Phenology to Better Know Your Land

Observing and documenting the seasonal phenomena that happen on your land can be a fascinating and important way to get an understanding of how it changes through the year. And it can be fun, too!

Biosolids: More Harm than Good, Part 2

This is Part 2 of an interview with David Lewis, Ph.D. - formerly a senior-level research microbiologist at EPA-ORD. He currently serves as director of research for the Focus for Health Foundation.

Biosolids: More Harm than Good, Part 1

Dr. David Lewis, Ph.D., who was formerly a senior level research microbiologist at EPA-ORD, kindly agreed to an interview for the MOTHER EARTH NEWS blog addressing the issue of agricultural use of sewage and industrial sludge, aka – biosolids. He is one of the most prominent scientific voices in the growing opposition to biosolids land application. Dr. Lewis’ publications are frequently cited as an example of solid, unbiased scientific evidence of the danger posed by this practice.

This Stuff is for the Birds

Creating a friendly environment for wild birds on your property can help them and provide for hours of viewing opportunities for you.

Rodenticides and Your Relationship with Carnivores

This blog post explains how the use of rodent poisons is having a serious effect on the health of carnivores. The very species that have the ability to control rodent populations are being negatively affected by the human use of poisons.

Stand Up and Sign Up: Community Farms Need You Now

With forces and circumstances intensifying all around, this is the optimum time to take positive action for your family, your community, and your planet. CSA Signup Day on Feb. 26 gives everyone an opportunity for intelligent action by joining and supporting a community farm (CSA).

The History of Sludge for Agricultural Application

Sewage sludge and industrial waste is applied to the farmland under the pretense of natural fertilizer. This dangerous practice introduces pathogens, heavy metals, pharmaceuticals and thousands of other pollutants into the soil and groundwater. This is a brief review of a failed federal legislature that allowed it to happen.

A Gradual Wakening to Spring

Following the Wheel of the Year gives us monthly moments to celebrate. Imbolc is a reminder that half of winter is now behind us.

An Introduction to Parasitic Plants

Parasites catch a bad rap. Often feared and maligned, we tend to overlook the fact that they play an integral role in the ecological health of our ecosystems. Though animal and microbial parasites are most familiar, there are parasitic plants as well. What follows is a brief overview of the nature of parasitic plants.

MOTHER EARTH NEWS: February/March 2016

The February/March 2016 issue of MOTHER EARTH NEWS features articles about making a living in a rural community, growing delicious and disease-resistant tomatoes, raising sheep, making a backyard greenhouse, best wall framing techniques, growing high-yielding greens, and much, much more.

More Problems with Synthetic Nitrogen Fertilizer

Studies show that synthetic nitrogen fertilizer, which is ubiquitous in industrial agriculture, is linked with a buildup of uranium in water and in crops irrigated with that water, as well as increased soil acidification.

Are Electric Vehicles Bad for the Environment?

Recent studies have begun to spark a fresh debate about whether battery-powered electric vehicles are really better for the environment than gas-powered ones. The key point is asking how much the source of the electricity that powers an EV contributes to its green credentials. This post explores that question.

Best Kinds of Bird Food to Put Out This Winter

Putting out food for the wild birds in your area will help them get the nutrition they need to thrive through the cold months. Avian nutrition means much more than tossing out a few seeds. If you’re not sure what to put on your wild bird grocery shopping list, check out this list to get started.

Reflections on Bear Hibernation and Behavior

Since moving to the mountains of Southern Colorado, we have encountered many black bears and because of those encounters, we have learned much about the species. I find it incredible that bears and other smaller critters can hibernate. Our winters are sometimes 7+ months long and for any animal to put itself into a dormant state for that long is simply amazing. Read more insights into how bear hibernation works.

In Defense of Plants

It would seem that most people don’t pay any attention to plants unless they are pretty or useful in some way. I reject this reality outright. From the smallest duckweed to the tallest redwood, the botanical world is full of wonder. I am here to defend that.

Consilience Enhances Resilience: A Key Element of CSA Farms

As climate chaos intensifies, we have many reasons to cultivate resilience - the strength and flexibility to endure shocks and yet still function. Through CSA farms the quality of consilience - the linking together of principles from different disciplines - becomes a way for all shareholders to enhance the resilience of farms and thereby strengthen community.

Natural Burial Options

Stay green beyond the grave by planning a natural burial, or choosing a biodegradable coffin or urn.

Simple Lifestyle with Nature's Animals

More than 20 years ago, we made the decision to live a more simple life. Living in the big city, we had accumulated many possessions that had, at best, limited function. When we decided on a more uncluttered and simple lifestyle, we called an auctioneer and had him auction off the majority of our possessions. When we moved to our small cabin in the mountains we were immersed in nature.

Coyote: A Keystone Carnivore

Every member of an ecosystem community needs to be present in order to keep your land healthy and vibrant. That includes the carnivores - both terrestrial and avian. But one carnivore affects that ecosystem community more than the others: the keystone carnivore. And Coyotes play the role of the keystone carnivore in many of the landscapes of North America.

MOTHER EARTH NEWS: December 2015/January 2016

The December 2015/January 2016 issue of MOTHER EARTH NEWS features articles about homemade whole-grain flours, market farming on small acreage, vegetable portraits, making a kitchen cupboard, easy setups for home gardeners, dieting with healthful fats, and much, much more.

Personality Types and Permaculture

Ever wonder what the unseen, unnamed aspects of homesteading in community are? Social dynamics and personality types are vital, intimidating elements of farming in the country.

Black Bear Encounters

In our many encounters with black bears, we have had no serious incidents. Achieve harmony living in bear territory by staying calm and giving bears favorable distance.

Community Farmers Convene in America's Heartland

For dozens of reasons, it’s time to convene in America’s heartland a conference of farmers involved in Community Supported Agriculture (CSA). Here’s a sampler of the key topics that will arise.

The Real Cost Of Food Waste

The world's population is growing but we're wasting much of the food that's being produced. There are protections in place for those donating edible food, and there are many things you can do in your own home to reduce food waste.

Seeing the Forest for the Deer

Deer are unique in that they are often managed regardless of habitat quality. When ecology and grazers are out of balance, impacts on forest health and herd health can be severe.

Beneficial Uses for Drones

Drones can be used to survey areas to develop more accurate maps. They can be equipped with heat sensors and used in search and rescue at far less cost than putting people out there searching for those lost. This post counts the beneficial uses of drones, or airborne robots.

'I Am Coyote' Profiles North America's Native Carnivore

This blog post is an introduction to the author'snewly published book, "I Am Coyote." What is essential to know when living and farming with carnivores? I would suggest that THE most important aspect to understand is WHO THEY ARE. Get to know how they live, how they think, their complex social lives and much more.

Agroecology Rebuilds Rural Livelihoods of Women in Post-Earthquake Nepal

Many rural Nepalese faced persistent food insecurity even before the recent earthquakes. Now, because of the destruction of livelihood assets, the situation is substantially worse. With support from Groundswell International, family farmers in post-earthquake Nepal are learning and using ecological agriculture principles to restore their farms, become more resilient, and create a more equitable landscape for women.

Fall In the Rockies Invigorates the Senses

There is one time of the year in the mountains that is special and above all other seasons in my opinion. Fall time in the mountains is invigorating and refreshing. It is the season the invigorates all five senses. For a little Rocky Mountain fall-time inspiration, read on.

Our Native Carnivores: A Historical Perspective

As a conservation biologist whose focus is large carnivores, I find that historical perspectives regarding our understanding of our place within Earth’s communities and the behavior that flows from those perspectives is essential to understanding our present day relationship with carnivores. In my first post, I want to take you back in history, sharing with you worldviews and the actions that expressed those views, as Europeans settled on the American continent.

Music for Climate Change (with Video)

We recently attended a concert for Climate Change at the Uptown Arts Bar in Kansas City organized by Craig Wolfe and Randy Deutch of the band Soular. The concert premiered a song by Winston Apple that brought tears to some eyes in the audience. There is no way to know for sure if we’re past the point of no return.

MOTHER EARTH NEWS: October/November 2015

The October/November 2015 issue of MOTHER EARTH NEWS features articles about small-space fruit trees, building your own natural backyard pond, edible plants, living in homesteading communities, making homemade convenience foods, choosing the right trailer for your homestead, and much, much more.

One Man's Trash is Another's Weeknight Dinner: Lessons from a Dumpster Diver

Are you bothered by the food industry, landfills, or consumer culture and interested in free, quality eats? If yes, then look no further than your local trash receptacles. Unless a dumpster is located against a building or enclosed by a fence with “No Trespassing” signs, they are veritable treasure troves ripe for plundering.

Joining Forces for More Sustainable Communities

Throughout the U.S., neighbors discover strength and security as they embrace a do-it-ourselves approach to more sustainable communities. These seven Homestead Hamlets can serve as models for creating more resilient neighborhoods.

Why Recycling Might Not Be Enough

Recycling is an important step towards a cleaner, healthier environment. But recycling alone is not the most effective way to reduce landfill-bound trash from your home. PREcycling stops much of that packaging waste from coming into your home in the first place!

Mountain Hunting

A short story about how deer and deer hunting have changed in both the Catskill Mountains and Hudson Valley of New York State.

Woody Tasch: The State of the Soil

In February, the Slow Money founder gave a "State of the Soil" address. Here are his thoughts on the quality of American soil, economics and general discourse.

One of the Best Ways to Help The Environment Is to Remedy Ourselves

Most environmental activists focus on top down policy changes to combat global challenges like climate change. But to enact real change, we need to look inwards. The environmental challenges we face in the 21st century are outcomes of who we collectively are as individuals. The best ways to help the environment is to better ourselves.

MOTHER EARTH NEWS: August /September 2015

The August/September 2015 issue of MOTHER EARTH NEWS features articles about year-round gardening, this generation’s homesteaders, getting rid of ticks, using solar ovens, the best types of cider apples, making your own biodiesel, and much, much more.

The International Year of Soils

To raise awareness about the importance of soil health, the United Nations declared 2015 the International Year of Soils.

Fibromatosis in Wild Deer

We had a visit from a deer that looked to be in bad condition and the result was fibromatosis, a non-life-threatening skin condition afflicting mostly young male deer.

Deerculture

Deer impact our lives, whether you're a farmer, permaculturalist, forester, hunter, vegetarian, or landscaper. According to The Nature Conservancy, "No other threat (upon forests) is greater at this point in time." So what to do?

So You Think Your City is Green? Introducing a Sustainable Cities Rating System

As the question of what it means to be “green” is becoming more frequently asked, many new rating systems have been introduced to measure the performance and sustainability of everything from appliances, food, buildings, and corporations. But what if we could rate the largest and most complex things that humans build with one methodology? The International Ecocity Framework & Standards Initiative takes on the challenge of rating cities.

Become a Caretaker of Your Environment: Lessons from a Lipan Apache Shaman

The information and ideas presented in this post are from teachings and skills Tom Brown, Jr., learned from the Lipan Apache Shaman and elder Stalking Wolf, who mentored Tom a decade. We can learn to develop a relationship with the Earth that becomes an ongoing communication and a form of mutual healing. The lessons and skills of nature awareness, wilderness survival and a philosophy of living with the Earth focus on how to cultivate a caretaker approach.

Walking on Gold

We took some test pans of dirt to see if we had any gold coming out of our springs. Sure enough some small pieces of gold.

PBS Program Chronicles Sage Grouse and Other Inhabitants of the Sagebrush Sea

WNET Thirteen’s new Nature episode, “The Sagebrush Sea,” tracks the Greater Sage Grouse and other wildlife through the seasons as they struggle to survive in a rugged and changing landscape. The program airs Wednesday, May 20, at 8 p.m. (ET) on PBS (check local listings) and will be available for streaming after the broadcast on the PBS website.

MOTHER EARTH NEWS: June/July 2015

The April/May 2015 issue of MOTHER EARTH NEWS features articles about canning and preserving, renewable home energy, avoiding common gardening mistakes, the best tools to have on your homestead, lobbying for better food policies, building a backyard fire pit and smoker, and much, much more.

Weather, Climate Change and Where to Go To Escape

Recent studies show that the jet-stream patterns have changed significantly during the last decade. The oscillations that bring the jet stream down to lower latitudes have increased in frequency and amplitude.

Caretaking in Paradise

Caretaking wild places is a great way to homestead in paradise without having to afford land.

Mothering the Earth

A story about Indigenous women taking care of their land in the Pacific Northwest by restoring the native ecosystem.

Poetry of the Land

Language is born of experience -- so enrich your vocabulary! Go outside! Learn how to address "the sparkle of morning sunlight through hoar-frost." And don't let the world die in the dictionary.

Citizen Scientists Monitor and Map

The Cornell Lab of Ornithology has several Citizen-Science Projects to engage individuals and communities in actively participating in conservation efforts. Learn more about these programs and how to become involved.

‘The Wild Wisdom of Weeds’ by Katrina Blair

"The Wild Wisdom of Weeds," by wild-foods advocate and author Katrina Blair, is the only book on foraging and wild edibles to focus on thirteen weeds found all over the world, which together comprise a complete food source and extensive medical pharmacy and first-aid kit. Blair’s philosophy is sobering, realistic, and ultimately optimistic: If we can open our eyes to see the wisdom found in these weeds right under our feet, instead of trying to eradicate an “invasive,” we could potentially achieve true food security and optimal health.

A Film as Lovely as a Tree

A look at "Trees," the newest film from award winning journalist and filmmaker Nick Werber.

Help Your Trees By Burning Firewood

Those who garden know that weeding is often essential to growing good vegetables or fruits. In a forest, sunlight too is a limiting factor. By knowing which tree to cut and which to leave, forest health can be improved. Cutting for firewood can serve as an incentive to "weed" on the ultra-perennial scale.

Your Earth Day Guide to Lake Cleanup

While you should be doing good for the environment all throughout the year, Earth Day is the perfect time to take it the extra mile. Cleaning up a local lake or pond is a great way to give back to the community and the planet.

5 Fire Pit Safety Tips from A Former Wildland Firefighter

Fire pits can be great things. They are attractive, inexpensive to use and help to extend the use of your yard through the fall and winter. But they must be used safely. Here are some guidelines for fire pit safety.

Bald Eagles on Live Web Cams

Check out these Bald Eagles captured on live web cams! Right now these bald eagles are taking turns to incubate their eggs which should be hatching any day now. As beautiful as this could be please remember this is nature and anything can happen.

MOTHER EARTH NEWS: April/May 2015

The April/May 2015 issue of MOTHER EARTH NEWS features articles about the benefits of grass-fed meat, growing winter squash, turning extra food scraps into delicious meals, finding the right utility vehicle for your homestead, farming inside city limits, building a garden potting bench, using the most efficient watering systems in your garden, healing and preventing minor gardening and farming injuries, and much, much more.

The Birds Are Coming. Are You Ready?

Spring bird migration is underway! Backyard gardeners play a valuable role in supporting birds during this vulnerable time. Learn what you can do in your own yard to help migrants.

7 Local Services You Should Use More

Choosing to purchase goods and services from local vendors impacts your local economy twice as much as purchasing from corporate suppliers. Here are seven local services you can remember to purchase from more often.

Owl Hunting!

During a quiet, pre-dawn moment, an owl hoots softly. Is this connected with the bounty of mice and a big harvest?

Legalized Marijuana

We have found that there are down sides to legalization of marijuana in Colorado.

What's in Our Water?

Your drinking water might not be as spring fresh as you'd like to think.

The Lowdown on Compact Fluorescent Light Bulbs

Compact fluorescent bulbs are very energy efficient, but disposing of them can cause complications because of the mercury in them. It is good to be informed about proper recycling and make informed decisions to minimize greenhouse gases.

Why Everyone Talks About the Weather

It is said that everybody talks about the weather but no one does anything about it. Here is the reason we all talk about it and hints on what to do about it.

What Is All the Buzzzz?

Native bees are a necessary component of maintaining native habitats. Their role is increasingly important as honeybee populations struggle with Colony Collapse Disorder. Learn what you can do to support your local pollinators this spring.

Neighborhood Micro Nurseries, Part 1

We are creating two neighborhood nurseries where we'll raise trees and plants to share with neighbors to develop a neighborhood food forest.

Choosing Voluntary Poverty

Voluntary poverty and simplicity is one of the most important and under-realized ways of living green and living great!

The Necessity of Human Mortality

With humans living longer and technologies on the horizon that could prolong our lives even further, we must accept the necessity of our own mortality. When we do, we will finally realize the full heroic potential of our species.

Growing Your Own Is More Than a Life-Style Choice

When we produce locally what we consume locally creates cells of sustainability. The shorter our supply lines the more resilient we become. More importantly, sustainable cells produce a healthier and more beautiful way of life.

Is Natural Gas Green?

Natural gas sounds green. After all, it has "natural" in the title. But how green is natural gas, really?

MOTHER EARTH NEWS: February/March 2015

The February/March 2015 issue of MOTHER EARTH NEWS features articles about making your own pasta, growing flowers and vegetables together, nutritious crop varieties, maximizing MPG, building a drying rack for pastas and herbs, capitalizing on your recycling habits, using a standing desk to boost your health, making your own low-cost homemade yogurt, and much, much more.

Worms Eat My Poop: Building a Vermiculture Compost Toilet

A simple, low maintenance compost toilet that makes instant fertilizer by separating solids (worm food) from liquids (fertilizer, ready-to-use). Two chambers allows one to compost while you make deposits in the the other.

How to Join the Seed-Sharing Movement

Seed sharing has come under attack and seed libraries across the country are being threatened with extinction. Here are nine ways to join the movement to keep seed sharing legal and free.

Winter Bird Survival

Birds are survivors. Learn about different adaptations birds have to thrive during the dark, cold winter days. And, what you can do to support winter bird survival in your backyard.

Urban Community Green Spaces

Urban community green spaces are an essential component of our built environment. Their significance is becoming more and more apparent to city planners and urban residences all over the United States.

Kiva Zip's Innovative Approach to Lending

In conventional lending, underwriting decisions are based on averages, and algorithms, credit scores and cashflows. They do not reflect a would-be borrower’s character, and are un-nuanced — “black and white.” Kiva Zip, a non-profit based in San Francisco, is pioneering an innovative, character-based approach to lending that allows for a more colorful underwriting canvass.

Sustainable Timber Management for Homesteaders

Managing timbered property can benefit your wildlife and your pocketbook, but beware! Timber buyers are often con-artists. Learn the questions you should be asking about sustainable timber management on your property or homestead.

Greener Options for Recreational Boating

When self-propelled boats or surf boards are not an option in the water, there are several boating choices and technologies now available along the continuum of sustainability.

5 Hiking Essentials

Whether you're planning a last minute day trip or a multi-week expedition, these five hiking tips are a must for seasoned hikers and newcomers alike.

MOTHER EARTH NEWS: December 2014/January 2015

The December 2014/January 2015 issue of MOTHER EARTH NEWS features articles about easy, homemade one-pot meals (accompanied by plenty of recipes!), sourcing truly high-quality garden seeds, whipping up your own body care products, making hay the old-fashioned way, early tomato varieties, growing and cooking leeks and winter squash, electric cars, and much, much more.

The Resurgence of School Gardens

School gardens play a vital role in our nations educational systems. Though the concept dates back to the 1800s, their role has gained popularity in the last 20 years, and for good reasons.

Read MOTHER EARTH NEWS in Japanese!

The MOTHER EARTH NEWS team welcomed visitors from Japan, who have been translating the magazine into Japanese for subscribers.

Seed Saving and Line Breeding: Preparing for Climate Change

Climate change is a sign of the end of the industrial age. If humans are going to survive the end of the industrial age it will be because individuals and groups of neighbors take these matters into their own hands. It cannot happen any other way.

Planning Yard Projects for Next Year? Begin With a YardMap

The YardMap Network is a citizen science project designed to cultivate a richer understanding of bird habitat, for both people concerned with their local environments and professional scientists. The program is housed at the Lab of Ornithology, in Ithaca, New York. We collect data by asking individuals across the country to draw maps of their backyards, parks, farms, favorite birding locations, schools, and gardens.

Backpacking? Try a Tarp for Shelter

Tarps are lightweight and inexpensive alternatives to conventional backpacking shelters. Consider switching to a tarp for shelter in order to minimize pack weight and maximize your enjoyment in the great outdoors.

The History of Samhain and Halloween

The history of Samhain reminds us that we once celebrated holidays because of a shared human connection that resonated with the Earth’s cycles — the weather, the moon, the harvest — rather than needless consumerism or “heroic” dominance.

These Nature Photos Will Tickle Your Funny Bone

Mara Grunbaum's conversations with and about a hilariously personified "Evolution" provide a running commentary throughout "WTF, Evolution?!" accompanied by really excellent nature photos.

John Michael Greer's 'Star's Reach' Portrays Back-to-Basics Future

If you were a teenager in the 1990s, you remember the flying cars and giant holograms of Back to the Future II, set in the impossibly distant 2015. If you were a kid in the 1960s, you probably remember the talking robots and interstellar travel of Lost in Space, set in the faraway 1990s. John Michael Greer's new novel 'Star's Reach' depicts a different, back-to-basics future world.

Environment and Society: Where is the Disconnect?

K.C. Compton takes a glance at more than two dozen trends that are shaping our future, which are documented in the Worldwatch Institute’s latest publication, "Vital Signs, Volume 21."

Healthy or Sterile?: Creating Biodiverse Systems

Our declining industrial system has created a series of environmental and social problems and can no longer produce the wealth required to solve them. That means that ordinary citizens must shoulder the burden of changing the way things are done by creating biodiverse systems. Here is a place to start.

U.S. Deer Herds in Trouble

Warmer weather proliferated the rise of a viral infection in deer dubbed Episodic Hemorrhagic Disease (EHD), carried by a tiny biting fly called a midge. Unfortunately, individual state deer management, once based in science, has now grown to be political. Influenced by farm agency and insurance company lobbyists, legislators regularly appoint natural resources directors who are not faithful guardians of wildlife.

500-Square-Foot House

Living in a 500-square-foot house (or smaller) affects our consumption and relationships.

Come for the FAIR, Then Embark on an Ecotourism Adventure

Come early or spend a few days after the three days of the MOTHER EARTH NEWS FAIR, held at the Seven Springs Mountain Resort in Pennsylvania this September 12 – 14, 2014. Less than 30 miles from Seven Springs Mountain Resort, there’s an ecotourism adventure to be had.

Lessons from the Mother Earth News Fair

At the Mother Earth News Fair in Puyallup, Wash, I listened to lecturers cover topics from re-newable energy, small-scale farming, green building, organic gardening, simple living, and citizen solidarity building. While I listened, I pondered ways to weave these powerful themes into our children's lives.

Coming Home To Nature

Connecting deeply to place is crucial, explains bioregionalist Jesse Wolf Hardin, in this new series about reinhabiting the living land.

MOTHER EARTH NEWS: October/November 2014

The October/November 2014 issue of MOTHER EARTH NEWS features articles about off-grid living, growing cold-hardy kale, spinach and Austrian winter peas, eight great places you’ve (maybe) never heard of, Icelandic chickens, understanding plant pollination for improved gardening, building a portable greenhouse, terrific homesteading tools, and much, much more.

8 Great Places You've (Maybe) Never Heard Of, 2014 Edition

Throughout the United States, people are working together to create local food systems, plan for a healthy future and build sustainable communities. Each year the MOTHER EARTH NEWS Great Places series highlights towns and cities that are working to get it right. The 2014 choices are Ashland, Oregon; Beaufort, South Carolina; Bozeman, Montana; Burlington, Vermont; Penns Valley, Pennsylvania; Evanston, Illinois; Lincoln, Nebraska; and Sparta, Tennessee.

Weather and Farmers Market Foods

August 3 to 9 is National Farmers Market Week! How does weather impact growth and harvest of fruits and vegetables? www.earthgauge.net/?p=36863

Ecotourism in Asheville, Day 3

Asheville has a long history of attracting people searching for a tranquil place for personal retreats and wellness. For Day 3, it’s time to chill, revitalize ourselves and do some rebalancing of our mind, body and spirit on a health and wellness tour.

Why Homestead

A stack of cast-iron pans and a chainsaw helmet sum up why these homesteaders do what they do.

Best Mosquito Traps for Your Yard

Discover the best mosquito traps to use in your yard. Improving your mosquito control will ensure that you can enjoy your summer evenings outdoors.

MOTHER EARTH NEWS: August/September 2014

The August/September 2014 issue of MOTHER EARTH NEWS features articles about our 2014 Homesteaders of the Year, the best summer cover crops, DIY storage bins for your produce, mycorrhizal fungi, pickling, the hidden salt in supermarket meat, building a biogas generator to produce natural gas, cooking with tomatoes, green beans and basil, understanding the immune system, and much, much more.

Swimming Hole Season

The beauty and refreshment of our swimming hole are a swell compliment to work and sun of our homestead.

The Dirty Little Secret of the Electronic Era

Electronic waste, aka e-waste, is the fastest growing waste stream of our time. E-waste is considered hazardous waste and more often than not, is recycled improperly. But there are ways to avoid contributing to the growth of this toxic waste.

Films on 'Green' Topics

This is a listing of some of the green-themed films that came out between 2012-2014. These films are on a variety of topics, including food/agriculture, health, energy sources, water, climate change, animals, etc.

Thomas Jefferson's Favorite Crop is Back in American Soil

One of the favorite events among attendees to the Puyallup MOTHER EARTH NEWS FAIR was investigative author Doug Fine’s Hemp Bound talk. Here are his thoughts on why hemp matters so much, a belief that was translated into a passionate and funny workshop.

Protect the Beach

Whether you live on the beach or 1000s of miles away, there are easy ways you can protect coastal water quality.

Smart Agriculture in Cameroon Minimizes Greenhouse Gases

At a time when greenhouse gas emissions from cars and electricity generation around the world are at an all-time high, Heifer International in Cameroon is leading initiatives and programming to help reduce such emissions from livestock production there.

Water-Smart Gardening

Planting a water-smart garden with native plants can help you save water when temperatures heat up.

Hot Tips to Stay Cool

Memorial Day signifies the unofficial start of summer and onset of hot weather. Use these tips to stay cool.

World Environment Day Biodiversity Symposium

On May 27, the Rachel Carson Homestead Association and the Carnegie Museum of Natural History are hosting the Celebrate Biodiversity Symposium in Pittsburgh, Penn., to celebrate the United Nations World Environment Day. Read to find out more and to register.

Woody Harrelson Partners With Step Forward Paper

Step Forward Paper is a new type of paper made most from wheat straw (80 percent to be exact) with the remaining 20 percent made of Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) certified wood fiber.

MOTHER EARTH NEWS: June/July 2014

The April/May 2014 issue of MOTHER EARTH NEWS features articles about conquering pernicious pests, less-than-stellar soil and other gardening challenges, homesteading within city limits, slashing your food costs by buying in bulk, building a root cellar, growing and processing your own wheat, understanding garden soil pH, making fresh cheeses, and much, much more.

Moving Toward an Ecology-Based Economy

As the planetary ecology falters, and finite resources are depleted, communities everywhere will be challenged to create vibrant local economies that function within and help to renew local ecosystems.

Ecotourism in Asheville, North Carolina: Day One

Surrounded by the Blue Ridge Mountains and the Pisgah National Forest, with the Great Smoky Mountains to the southwest, Asheville, North Carolina, is the perfect basecamp for an ecotour, cultural trip and culinary adventure. Experiencing the MOTHER EARTH NEWS Fair held here this past April was just the start for my wife and me.

Surprising Animal Friendships

Swoon over these Facebook-submitted tales of animal friendships. From bossy farm cats to broody hens to motherly Jersey cows – we’ve compiled stories from every corner of the barnyard.

Air Conditioning Check-Up

Spring is the perfect time to give your home cooling equipment a check-up before hot weather arrives.

'The Farm Then and Now' by Douglas Stevenson

"The Farm Then and Now" by Douglas Stevenson tells the story of The Farm: an intentional community that has defied the odds, blending idealism with a practical approach to create a model for sustainable living.

'Grass, Soil, Hope' by Courtney White

"Grass, Soil, Hope" by Courtney White is a new book from Chelsea Green Publishing that discusses combating climate change through land-based carbon sequestration efforts such as composting and increasing biodiversity.

National Arbor Day

National Arbor Day is April 25. Celebrate by learning about trees, volunteering or planting a tree at home!

A Lesson of Hope

How a hopelessly damaged apple tree has delivered lessons of hope since 2007.

A Pollen Explosion

A cold winter and late-season snow in some parts of the U.S. could mean a rough spring allergy season.

Ecotourism Adventures in Miami and Fort Lauderdale, Part 3

Nested amongst the skyscrapers and tucked between white-powdery beaches and either the buzz of South Beach or nature preserves in Hollywood are some eco-minded hotels and restaurants offering patrons a taste of local and sustainable cuisine.

Vandana Shiva to Visit Kansas City

Leading food sovereignty activist Vandana Shiva will present “Cultivating Diversity, Freedom and Hope” in Kansas City. Many other farming and gardening workshops and events are planned for April 17-18, 2014.

Black-Capped Chickadee's Secret Diet

The Blacked-capped Chickadee, a frequent visitor to backyard bird feeders, loses a surprising amount of weight each night. Don't try this diet!

Ecotourism Adventures in Miami and Fort Lauderdale, Part 2

Natural escapes to ecological preserves minutes away by bike in Hollywood, Florida. A vast sawgrass and gator-inhabited wilderness, including the Everglades National Park, found less than an hour’s drive from the Miami skyline. What surprised my family and me the most on our recent ecotourism adventure in the Miami or Fort Lauderdale areas were their accessibility – and beauty.

MOTHER EARTH NEWS: April/May 2014

The April/May 2014 issue of MOTHER EARTH NEWS features articles about conquering pernicious pests, less-than-stellar soil and other gardening challenges, homesteading within city limits, slashing your food costs by buying in bulk, building a root cellar, growing and processing your own wheat, understanding garden soil pH, making fresh cheeses, and much, much more.

Financial Incentives Increase Recycling Rates

Where environmental groups claim financial incentives for recycling to be a costly and unnecessary form of expenditure, we see them as the only realistic option available which actually produces the desired effect.

How to Deter Swallows

Absolute Bird Control offers a few easy to implement tips for deterring swallows from nesting on, or near, your home.

The Emergence of Perennial Wheat

Interest in breeding a perennial version of wheat is once again on the rise. That would help reduce soil erosion, maintain soil cover, and cut back on fossil-fuel and chemical inputs.

Fix a Leak

Chase down household leaks and fix them to save water and money during the Earth Gauge #FixALeak Week.

Guard Your Groundwater

Protect our water supplies during National Groundwater Awareness Week by saving water at home.

Ecotourism Adventures in Miami and Fort Lauderdale, Part 1

While some visitors to the Miami and Fort Lauderdale area spend much of the time baking in the sun, hitting the clubs or running up credit cards shopping, my family and I discovered that a subtropical ecotravel adventure awaits less than a half hour away in every direction from the big city bustle.

Sustainable Farming with Reynaldo Ochoa: Rainforest Hero

Reynaldo Ochoa, the subject of a new short film, grows with a goal of teaching and practicing permaculture unique to an individual's region, emphasizing sustainable farming as opposed to “slash and burn” agriculture.

Eco-Minded Trash Pickup System

With the right vehicle and a little dedication, you can develop a trash pickup system and prevent a number of useful items from ending up in the landfill.

What Makes Wetlands Stink?

One of the most recognizable features of wetlands is their smell. What makes these areas so pungent?

Amazing View of Earth at Night (Video)

This mesmerizing video shows city lights, wildfires in Australia, and even gas flares in the Middle East, all photographed from a satellite high over our heads.

Relocating Wild Animals

If you’re considering taking measures to control wildlife in your area by relocating wild animals, you may want to think twice. Start by learning about what happens to wild animals after they’re trapped and released in a new location.

Uncork Sustainably When You Wine and Dine

While you may already look for eco-friendly organic wine when you select a bottle, you're probably not aware of the environmental implications of opting for a wine closed with natural cork in lieu of a less sustainable synthetic stopper.

What’s Wrong With 2,4-D Herbicide?

The release of new genetically modified crops resistant to 2,4-D herbicide will mean a huge increase of potent, dangerous chemicals on American farmland and a serious threat of herbicide drift problems for other growers.

MOTHER EARTH NEWS: February/March 2014

The February/March 2014 issue of MOTHER EARTH NEWS features articles about saving money via self-reliance, maximizing your garden’s output, compost bins and tumblers, homemade herbal medicines, growing and storing potatoes, wheat, raising ducks and geese, growing fruit trees, and much, much more.

Ecotourism in Florida, Part 1: Island-Hopping on the Wild Side

With more than 1,700 islands that encompass the Florida Keys, they provide refuge to hundreds of bird species, a spectacular diversity of tropical plants and abundant sea life. In other words, it’s the ultimate place for tropical eco-adventure without leaving the continental US. No passport needed.

Self-Reliance Is the Tie That Binds, Part 1

By focusing on the conscientious habits and self-reliance of its readers, MOTHER EARTH NEWS has seen its audience quadruple over the past decade. Publisher Bryan Welch discusses the reasons for this growth.

Water Pollution Activist Explains Water Filter Options

A hippie in the 1980s who demonstrated for a clean environment, particularly water, now owns an online water filter business where she shares her views about the scarcity and fragility of water, the toxins dumped in it and what we can do about it.

Healing the Earth

Self-dubbed “lunatic farmer” Joel Salatin describes how sustainable living and more conscientious agricultural practices can mend and revive a planet pushed near the brink.

Gaia Shrugged

Musing on how most of us believe "the end" is near for various reasons.

Resolve to Stay Curious and Live Passionately in 2014

In 2014, I resolve to stay curious about the incredible world that we live in and continue to ask plenty of questions each day. I resolve to learn new things and stay informed and aware of global issues.

What Are Headwater Streams?

Headwater streams are small streams or tributaries that carry water from the upper reaches of a watershed to a river.

Connect With MOTHER EARTH NEWS on Facebook

The MOTHER EARTH NEWS state- and province-specific Facebook pages are a unique social media platform designed for sharing wiser-living news, notes and networking with your neighbors.

We Still Need To Deal With Drought

Drought has been displaced by winter storms in the headlines, but persistent water shortages are plaguing much of North America, and the past 18 months have seen a global outbreak of water emergencies.

Why Life Exists on Earth: A New Perspective on Carbon Emissions

Mankind’s use of fossil fuels during the last 200 years has dumped millions of years of sequestered carbon into the atmosphere in the form of Carbon Dioxide. Since the beginning of the industrial revolution, 315 gigatons of carbon have been added to the atmosphere, leaving the carbon cycle 315 gigatons out of balance.

Audubon Christmas Bird Count

Participate in Audubon’s Christmas Bird Count to help scientists study winter bird populations: www.earthgauge.net/?p=33409

Natural Toys and Games for a Green Holiday

There’s no reason not to “go green” when picking up a game for a young loved one. Despite the abundance of “Made in China” plastic toys and games that line the aisles, some companies have made it their business to create amazingly fun toys and games for children in ways that protect, preserve or restore the planet.

Eyes on Central Pennsylvania Wildlife

WTAJ has partnered with the National Environmental Education Foundation and Project Noah to help show wildlife and the impacts of weather on living things in Central Pennsylvania.

Hunting For A Connection with Miles Olson

Expand your perspective on hunting and compassion and possibly even your approach to life and death. Miles Olson is dedicated to a sustainable and non-destructive lifestyle of breaking down the barrier between the self and the universe.

America Recycles Day

Recycling one aluminum can saves enough energy to power a laptop for 5 hours! America Recycles Day is Nov 15.

Why Having Pets Makes Us More Human

Through all of the tears and the heartbreak, I have found that having a pet makes us more human. Please why everyone should have at least one best friend that is furry.

Be Smart About “Green” Businesses

Here are a few ways to know if a business is supporting green practices or not. Green practices are increasingly more and more important as companies increase and continue to have a large impact on the environment.

Two Years After Oklahoma Earthquake Officials Warn More to Come

The quake that struck near Prague, Oklahoma on November 5, 2011, was the biggest ever recorded in the state. Now geologists are warning Oklahomans that quakes may become a regular phenomenon in the state. And the problem is apparently connected to natural-gas operations.

DIY Squirrel Repellent

Discourage squirrels from eating bird feed and corn cobs with this simple trick.

A Novel Box of Toys

After throwing away their TV, a California-based family had to find a suitable replacement for Saturday morning cartoons.

Lighten Up (and Save)

Fall is a great time to replace traditional light bulbs with energy-efficient bulbs. Save up to $50 per year.

Keep That Hummingbird Feeder Out

A well-stocked hummingbird feeder throughout September and October will not only give you hours of birdwatching entertainment, but it will also keep your birds happy come migration time.

New Meaning for the New Covenant

Only through selfless, voluntary, individual sacrifice can we expiate our essential human flaw and restore the Garden. We have to accept mortality as the necessary and – if voluntary – heroic alternative. We must divert the resources we are using to mindlessly expand human life and work and invest them, instead, in the improvement of all life both human and non-human.

Mountain High in the Laurel Highlands

While the Mother Earth News Fair at Seven Springs Mountain Resort may have been John D. Ivanko's family’s primary destination (as speakers about renewable energy, sustainable living and farmstead cooking), it definitely wasn’t their only reason for eco-touring the region known as the Laurel Highlands.

Crossing the Spectrum

Every time I leave the MOTHER EARTH NEWS FAIR I come home with a bag full of stuff that I have accumulated along the way. My youngest son typically tears into the bag, once exclaiming that my return from the FAIR is always “like Christmas.”

Get Smart About 'Green' Businesses

Here are a few ways to know if a business is supporting green practices or not. Green practices are increasingly more and more important as companies increase and continue to have a large impact on the environment.

Eco-Tourism in the Laurel Highlands: By Bike, by Boat and On Foot

For three days before the MOTHER EARTH NEWS FAIR, held at the Seven Springs Mountain Resort, John D. Ivanko and his family rafted, biked, toured some of Frank Lloyd Wright-designed homes, and savored farm-to-table cuisine that blew us away at The Historic Stone House.

A Vision for a Better World, Part 2

For humanity to create a better world, we must address issues of economic equality and limited resources. The natural environment can recover from much damage if we gradually limit the human population and judge business success by quality rather than quantity.

I Want to Die

After Publisher and Editorial Director Bryan Welch decided that death might be a personal choice, he was struck by the heroic potential in making mortality a conscious decision. As we are increasingly able to lengthen our lives and perpetuate our health, the notion of death is transformed. Death is our ultimate opportunity to consciously give back.

The New Earthineer

From the outset, Earthineer was built to support and promote sustainability and homesteading as a lifestyle choice. Every feature we have planned has that goal in mind. What we have now is the foundation that we'll build off of.

9 Great Places You've (Maybe) Never Heard of, 2013 Edition

Each year, the MOTHER EARTH NEWS Great Places series highlights towns and cities that are working to create successful, sustainable communities. The 2013 choices are Arcata, Calif.; Ava, Mo.; Cumberland, Md.; Decorah, Iowa; Lander, Wyo.; Logan, Utah; Marfa, Texas; and Punta Gorda, Florida.

A Vision for a Better World, Part 1

Humanity has the power to change and to take the actions needed to foster a healthy planet and a better standard of living for all. Choosing beauty and abundance will ensure a better future not only for humanity, but for the natural environment as well.

Back to School

Headed back to school? Protect air quality, save energy and recycle for a healthier, greener school year.

How to Gut and Skin a Deer

In this beginner's guide, you'll find an introduction to gutting and skinning a deer, with simple, illustrated steps.

Wetland Water Sources

What makes a piece of land a wet-land? Not all wetlands are wet for the same reason.

The Responsibility of the Corporate World to the Environment

For decades, corporations have been able to skirt past being held accountable for any environmental irresponsibility, and that has helped propel us into a time where pollution is out of control, and our natural resources are at a constant decline. Raising the standards for these faceless corporations is becoming evermore necessary.

From the Trees to the Seas

Plant life along small streams starts a food chain that stretches all the way to the ocean.

Summer’s Sting

Buzz…sting…ouch! Why are yellow jackets more aggressive at this time of year?

How Green is My State? [Interactive Map]

Use an interactive map to compare your home states eco-friendliness, based on factors such as air quality, water quality, gasoline consumption and availability of public transportation.

Biochar: Not All it's Ground Up to Be?

Incorporating charcoal into the soil helped Amazonian farmers grow better crops, and its new industrial version is promoted as a panacea for both agriculture and the global climate. Those claims are not realistic.

Climbing Sequoias for Climate Change

For almost two decades, the Archangel Ancient Tree Archive group has done what the experts said was impossible. Namely, they have taken DNA from over 70 of the most magnificent trees on the planet; have cloned thousands of individuals from this original DNA and are actively re-planting/re-foresting these champion trees.

Resilience: Disaster Resistance, Adaptation and Restoration

As the costs and consequences of climatological and ecological instability become impossible to ignore, people are recognizing the need to be more prepared for the challenges we could face in the short-term and the long-term. A variety of initiatives are arising to share ways of becoming more resilient—i.e., able to survive and thrive in the face of dangers and even disasters.

Tornado Survival Tips

Tornado, facts, myths, and tips to help you make the right decision when facing a possible tornado strike.

Farmers With Benefits

Despite the recession, farmers, on average, have been more successful than non-farmers. So why keep expanding their subsidies?

An ‘Elemental’ Undertaking: Environmental Film Humanizes the Eco-Warrior

There’s more than one way to be an environmental warrior. And some approaches work better than others. Elemental follows the stories of three environmental advocates united by their deep connection with nature and driven to confront some of the most dire ecological issues affecting their respective communities. This isn’t only a story about plight and pollution, however. Rather, Gayatri Roshan’s and Emmanuel Vaughan-Lee’s documentary works best as a character-driven study of eco-activism’s do’s and don’ts.

New Study Reveals Flaws in Oil Spill Response

The Lawrence Anthony Earth Organization published a new analysis that depicts the dangerous flaws in oil spill response and outlines technology they claim will save marine life, oceans, animals and people, while saving millions of dollars.

Earth Week Special From Worm's Way

Want to Save on Earth-Friendly Products? Check out Worm's Way's sale by clicking on the Earth Week banner at WormsWay.com and enjoy up to 20 percent off your purchases.

Earth Gauge Tip of The Week - National Severe Weather Preparedness Week

Are you ready for the kinds of severe weather that could impact the area where you live? National Severe Weather Preparedness Week takes place from Mar. 3-9, 2013. This is a great time for you and your family to “Be a Force of Nature” by learning the importance of planning for severe weather events and practicing how and where to take shelter before severe weather strikes.

Putting a Price on the Environment

Will assigning monetary value to the environment help to create an ethic of land stewardship or cause further detachment from nature?

The Sacred Headwaters: Goliath Defeated by 1,000 Davids

People took a stand against one of the largest multi-national oil companies in the world and resolved to fight back against Shell’s plans to annihilate the Sacred Headwaters. And we were successful. After 5 years of incredible campaigning, community organizing, hard-hitting ads, protests and a storm of media coverage, Shell agreed to forfeit its tenures in the Sacred Headwaters and public pressure catalyzed the government of British Columbia to ban all further oil and gas development in the region.

Bastyr University Helps Create New Line of Teas

Bastyr University is pleased to announce it has partnered with Seattle-based Choice Organic Teas to develop and launch a new line of flavorful, certified organic Wellness Teas. This marks the first time the University has lent its name on a consumer product.

Mamma Chia Introduces Chia Squeeze

Mama Chia organic chia seeds are infused with delicious fruits and vegetables to create a convenient, fun and tasty snack for active souls of all ages.

Kasco Manufacturing Introduces 10’ Vari-Slice Seeder

Kasco Manufacturing introduced a new 10’ wide Vari-Slice seeder at the National Farm Machinery Show in Louisville, Ky.  The Vari-Slice seeder is suitable for applications including pasture seeding, beef, dairy and horse farms for worked or no-till conditions and where tight germination of grass seed is needed. 

MOTHER'S Newsletter Topics

For readers who want information in a dedicated subject area, this series of newsletter topics is designed to meet every need.

FCX Oil-Fired Condensing Boilers Entering North American Market

FCX Oil-Fired Condensing Boilers, designed and manufactured by Geminox, provide a reliable and efficient alternative to non-condensing boilers. FCX Boilers feature a steel, non-condensing primary heat exchanger coupled with a stainless steel, condensing secondary heat exchanger.

Backyard Conservation

Homeowners can do their part to support wildlife habitat by participating in backyard conservation projects.

Sansin Corporation Offers 5 Renovation Tips for Historic Homes for National Preservation Month

May is the National Trust for Historic Preservation’s National Preservation Month. In conjunction with this month dedicated to protecting historic places, Sansin Corporation — a wood protection company focused on eco-friendly, “water-borne” interior and exterior stains — offers tips that do-it-yourselfers should keep in mind when undertaking historic home renovations.

In Australia, The Red Shed

It may not be in the Kangaroo Valley tourist brochures, and you might think it odd to visit a rural supply store just for a look, but I would encourage any visitor to Australia's Kangaroo Valley to make a trip to the Red Shed.

Annie’s Expands its Organic Pasta Offerings with New Bernie’s Farm Macaroni & Cheese

Annie’s is expanding its line of wholesome comfort food favorites with a new, kid-friendly pasta product: Bernie’s Farm Macaroni & Cheese, made with 100 percent real cheese and certified-organic pasta in a variety of shapes featuring life on the farm. Like all of Annie’s products, Bernie’s Farm Macaroni & Cheese contains no artificial flavors, synthetic colors or preservatives.

Illegal Front Yard Vegetable Gardens: Des Moines Considers Home Garden Ban

Des Moines, Iowa, gardeners may soon find themselves in hot water with their City. A local resident recently took front yard veggie growers to task for what the resident feels to be unsightly lawn growth. Beets and berries, it seems, do not have the same aesthetic appeal as a green, freshly-mowed front lawn.

Rainwater Hub Offers Efficient Rainwater Harvesting

The Rainwater Hub is an entirely new answer to the limits of traditional downspout diverters and rain barrel systems. The Rainwater Hub distributes rainwater up to 150 feet through regular garden hoses.

Dixie Chopper Zee 2 Mowers Designed for High-Performance Residential Use

Dixie Chopper, the manufacturer of The World’s Fastest Lawn Mower, offers the Zee 2 series, its newest and largest line of residential zero-turn lawn mowers. Ideal for large property owners, Zee 2 mowers include a variety of features for fast performance, quality cutting and comfortable operation. 

Dansko Wins Award for Women’s Comfort Footwear

Dansko announced recently that it received the 2012 Plus Award for Design Excellence in the Women’s Comfort category. This is the eighth time — and seventh year in a row — that the comfort footwear leader has won the award.  

An Appalachian Alternative to Mountaintop Removal Coal Mines

Many criticize eliminating coal mining in West Virginia because of the amount of jobs the sector provides. A wind farm, however, would employ over 200 local residents during the two-year construction phase, and create 40-50 permanent maintenance jobs afterward. A wind farm would also allow the mountain to be used for other purposes, like sustainable forestry, mountain harvesting, and gathering of wild forest plants, creating additional jobs and the opportunity for stable income for locals.

Chevrolet Announces Carbon Reduction Initiative with Video

In 2010, Chevrolet announced that they were embarking on their Carbon Reduction Initiative, an effort to invest $40 million in carbon offset projects across the country with the goal of reducing up to 8 million metric tonnes of CO2 emissions. The program includes wind, landfill-gas-to-energy, solar, efficiency, and conservation projects.

MOTHER EARTH NEWS: April/May 2013

The April/May 2013 issue of MOTHER EARTH NEWS features articles about building cheap garden beds, tapping wind power at home, putting chickens to work in the garden, growing heart-healthy grapes, greenhouse kits, the White House garden, zero-turn mowers, the remarkable abilities of plants, and much, much more.

MOTHER EARTH NEWS: August/September 2013

The August/September 2013 issue of MOTHER EARTH NEWS features articles about freezing fruits and vegetables from your garden, easy ways to boost flavor and nutrition of fresh foods, space-saving home design, bringing in native bees, relocating a house, growing turnips and rutabagas, farm apprenticeships, melon recipes, our 2013 homesteaders of the year, and much, much more.

MOTHER EARTH NEWS: October/November 2013

The October/November 2013 issue of MOTHER EARTH NEWS features articles about strategies for self-reliant living, crafting mini-greenhouses, best crops and varieties for winter gardening, cob construction, working dogs for your homestead, summer grain crops, using fall leaves in the garden, nut recipes, our 2013 Great Places You’ve (Maybe) Never Heard Of, and much, much more.

MOTHER EARTH NEWS: December 2013/January 2014

The December 2013/January 2014 issue of MOTHER EARTH NEWS features articles about baking traditional sourdough bread, raising chickens for meat, building and using movable greenhouses, homemade cooking oils, herbal antibiotics, sweet potatoes, making sausage, cooking with cinnamon, and much, much more.

MOTHER EARTH NEWS: February/March 2013

The February/March 2013 issue of MOTHER EARTH NEWS features articles about living simply, growing Native American varieties of corn, beans and squash, DIY distilling, building a workbench, cultivating naturally sweet sorghum and stevia, heating your home with wood, crafting simple mini-greenhouses for your garden, and much, much more.

MOTHER EARTH NEWS: June/July 2013

The June/July 2013 issue of MOTHER EARTH NEWS features articles about growing staple crops for food self-sufficiency, pressure canning, building a pergola, green remodeling, nutrient deficiencies in our modern diet, starting a work-from-home business, selling your surplus garden goods, cooking with peaches, and much, much more.

The Blacksnake

We do not always recognize who, or what, may be watching over us, taking care of us in some way. In our case, it was a blacksnake, hidden from view for years but with us just the same.

Cleveland Neighborhoods Cooperate to Improve Urban Housing

 Inner-city communities in Cleveland are banding together to help their residents take greater control of their housing quality through low-interest mortgage loans, education in home maintenance skills, and energy audits. Originally published as "Local Self-Reliance" in the July/August 1983 issue of MOTHER EARTH NEWS.

Political Updates from 1983: Organic Farming Act, Compact Free Association, and More

Organic farming makes a comeback, Wisconsin Resources Protection Council fend off mining corporations, Palau Islanders resist a U.S. Department of Defense proposal to store nuclear material, a mixed environmental impact from new jobs bill, and nuclear power plant construction moratorium is upheld. Originally published as "Friends of the Earth" in the July/August 1983 issue of MOTHER EARTH NEWS.

Best Gardening Books of 1983

MOTHER's staffers recommend their picks of the summer season for books on gardening, cooking, literature for youngsters, continuing education, aging, and running a home business. Originally published as "Access" in the July/August 1983 issue of MOTHER EARTH NEWS.

Peruvian Mint

Here’s a relative newcomer plant that’s easy to grow, and very useful for the “survival garden” and the gardener with limited (or no) gardening skills.

Hockey Day in Canada

Cam discovers he isn't as young as he once was while enjoying a sense of community at the local arena.

Selected Quotations: An Index of Recent Posts

A selection of Words of the Wise. This index links to 5 different sets of great quotations, for your edification and entertainment. Witty quotations. Eco quotations. Quotations for gardeners and farmers. And more.

The Ozarks Natural Beauty

Discover the Ozarks region's natural beauty and adventure hot spots as told by Mike McArthy of Photozarks.

WiseWay Pellet Stove is Non-Electric, EPA-Certified

WiseWay Pellet Stove is the first and only EPA-certified and UL-listed non-electric pellet stove on the market today. This pellet stove eliminates the need for electricity by using a gravity-feed natural draft to accomplish a high efficiency rating of 75 percent. It’s capable of heating up to 2,000 square feet and able to hold a fire up to 31 hours on a 40-pound bag of pellets. The stove is also mobile home approved.  

The Birthday Run 2013

Every year on his birthday since 1977, Christopher Nyerges has done a "birthday memory run," where he runs a lap for each year, and attempts to recall what happened in his life in that year. Here is his report for 2013.