Raw milk, so controversial to buy and drink, can also be used in the kitchen for everything from cheese and yogurt to soufflé and custard.
Many garden vegetable crops produce excess leafy material perfect for feeding goats. Using these materials as milking snacks helps reduce the need for purchased grain & hay while recycling these waste products on the homestead.
Goats need to be held still in various contexts, including slaughtering, hoof-trimming, and milking. Ideally, the method of restraint should be comfortable/humane, strong, portable, easy to use, and affordable. We’ve developed a homemade goat restraint that fits these categories and has worked for many years.
White snakeroot (Ageratina altissima) is a potentially toxic plant, particularly for dairy animals as the toxins can be passed through the milk. It caused many human deaths during the age of European settlement in eastern North America, due to dairy animals grazing in brushy areas and woodlands. Modern homesteaders using such landscapes for their goats or other ruminants should learn to identify and remove white snakeroot to ensure the safety of their milk supply.
Are you planning to buy a goat? Here are 12 tips to consider when you are shopping for a goat.
Homestead dairy goats need proper shelters. Ideally these would be easy to set up and move, while providing all the animals’ needs. A variety of basic shelters can be based on simple, reusable pieces like cattle panels, pop-up tents, and chain-link panels. These structures make pasture-based goat management easier on a budget.
Includes a list of 21 must-have medical supplies a goat farm should never be without and a list of some nice to haves we have at Serenity Acres Farm.
In the year of the goat we must compare the personalities and characteristics of goat people with goats.
Homegrown.org blogger Dyan Redick of Bittersweet Farm honors - and helps keep alive - the legacy of fellow Maine goat herdswoman Pixie Day.
Here are 12 simple tips that will help you to fight the war on worms and coccidia in goats.
Our little farm received the USDA Value Added Producer Grant and we are embarking on an exciting future. Be with us from start to finish.
There are some questions worth exploring, find out if there is a BEST way to clean your goat's udder before milking.
Spending the time to get to your goats is more important than you may think
Ilene White Freedman contemplates sharing goat milk with the nursing kid.
The blog describes the experience of applying for a federal grant and shares some advice for others who might want to follow in those foot steps.
21 things you should know—or wish you had known—before starting a goat farm.
More goat babies and finding ideas to make money on a farm.
After a rocky start, the second half of breeding season ends happily for both goats and owners.
Dairy goat farmer Julia Shewchuck learned a lot about keeping dairy goats in her first few months (and much more since). It was a learning curve too steep to be repeated willingly, but which has saved many other goats’ lives since.
A homesteading family undertakes Extreme Home Makeover: Goat Edition at the possible expense of their sanity.
Follow Sarah Cuthill's search for a dairy mentor and her very first experience milking a goat.
A chemical-free way to keep goats' teats clean and the milk pure.
A dairy goat owner chronicles the frustrating beginning of her first breeding season.
Author Maggie Bonham recounts the various ways she's managed to obtain free goats, including Craigslist ads and trading for chickens.
A new homesteader commits some classic mistakes when buying her first goat.
"Garbage in, garbage out," is as true to goat nutrition as it is to the computer world and more folks should take heed!
HOMEGROWN Life blogger Dyan recalls how the seasons affected her childhood and how they guide her activities now on her Maine dairy farm.
Dyan writes about the changing season at Bittersweet Farm, and introduces us to the newest member of the flock, a black sheep named Little Man.
If there’s one thing I’ve learned in my short time of being a goat herder, it’s that at breeding time, the goats are in charge.
Steve Judge of Bob-White Systems in Vermont offers his Micro Dairy expertise in this blog series on how to start and manage a Micro Dairy, from farm and barn planning to selecting dairy cows, goats and sheep to daily operations and being profitable.
The summer days are getting longer, and so is the list of barn chores! Goats are kidding, cows are arriving, and a dream of having a raw milk dairy is becoming tangible.
Overdue does, goats with bloody milk, harried milkmaids... Oh where does it end?! Life isn't ALWAYS roses in the goat life; sometimes it does leave you tired frustrated.
The third and last part in choosing a herdsire.
The second part to choosing a herdsire for the dairy goat herd.
What to look for in a buck, and how to choose a herdsire.
A look into each dairy breed, on how much milk each one averages and what to expect in taste.
An introduction from a goat-crazy Oregonian.
Janice Spaulding teaches goat husbandry both at her farm in Maine, and around the country with her "Goat School."
When one of her goats starts looking for love for the first time, and hollering her little head off, Angela has to do some quick thinking to keep her precious pets from becoming that night's dinner!
Even dairy goats can have self-esteem issues...
Learn from the trials and tribulations of a beginning dairy goat owner.
Learn from the trials and tribulations of a beginning dairy goat owner!
Raising dairy goats has benefits that extend beyond fresh milk and cheese.

Subscribe Today - Pay Now & Save 66% Off the Cover Price

First Name: *
Last Name: *
Address: *
City: *
State/Province: *
Zip/Postal Code:*
(* indicates a required item)
Canadian subs: 1 year, (includes postage & GST). Foreign subs: 1 year, . U.S. funds.
Canadian Subscribers - Click Here
Non US and Canadian Subscribers - Click Here

Lighten the Strain on the Earth and Your Budget

MOTHER EARTH NEWS is the guide to living — as one reader stated — “with little money and abundant happiness.” Every issue is an invaluable guide to leading a more sustainable life, covering ideas from fighting rising energy costs and protecting the environment to avoiding unnecessary spending on processed food. You’ll find tips for slashing heating bills; growing fresh, natural produce at home; and more. MOTHER EARTH NEWS helps you cut costs without sacrificing modern luxuries.

At MOTHER EARTH NEWS, we are dedicated to conserving our planet’s natural resources while helping you conserve your financial resources. That’s why we want you to save money and trees by subscribing through our earth-friendly automatic renewal savings plan. By paying with a credit card, you save an additional $5 and get 6 issues of MOTHER EARTH NEWS for only $12.00 (USA only).

You may also use the Bill Me option and pay $17.00 for 6 issues.