Hoop houses have proven themselves to be invaluable for extending the gardening season in both spring and fall. But I didn’t expect to get even more use out of mine during our frequent and unpredictable hail storms!
Can animals actually tell us what the weather has in store for us?
Recent studies show that the jet-stream patterns have changed significantly during the last decade. The oscillations that bring the jet stream down to lower latitudes have increased in frequency and amplitude.
It is said that everybody talks about the weather but no one does anything about it. Here is the reason we all talk about it and hints on what to do about it.
Consider planting these three categories of vegetable crops during late summer and fall: Warm weather crops that will die with frost. Cool weather crops that grow well in spring and fall, but don’t thrive in your summer. Cold-hardy crops to grow over the winter and get off to a fast start in early spring.
Memorial Day signifies the unofficial start of summer and onset of hot weather. Use these tips to stay cool.
Two homesteaders discuss their experience with the weather applicable to their mountain homesteads in Washington and Colorado.
Ed Essex and Bruce McElmurray compare their weather experiences living at 4,200 feet and 9750 feet elevation respectively.
Two homesteaders from Washington and Colorado comment on their greatest weather fear in the mountains.
When lettuce is mentioned, many think of the standard iceberg lettuce found in supermarkets and restaurant salads. That is changing with the growth in popularity of the different types of lettuces from Romaine to head and leaf-type lettuces, mainly due to the flavors and colors that they offer from deep red to almost white and noticeably sweet to tangy and slightly bitter.
Bruce McElmurray and Ed Essex collaborate on how the weather dictates to their mountain homesteading.
Was it a teacher? A parent? A field trip? What was your Earth Changing Moment? Share your first connection with the environment.
Participate in Audubon’s Christmas Bird Count to help scientists study winter bird populations:
WTAJ has partnered with the National Environmental Education Foundation and Project Noah to help show wildlife and the impacts of weather on living things in Central Pennsylvania.
Ready to decorate? Show your holiday spirit with LED lighting to save energy and money.
Once the frost has finished the warm weather crops, the cool weather crops take center stage for a fall and winter harvest. Learn how to make that happen.
10 easy steps to get your home prepared for winter.
Are you Weather-Ready? September is National Preparedness Month.
Create a pollinator-friendly garden to attract hummingbirds, bees, bats and other animals.
The federal government spent more taxpayer money on 2012 severe weather cleanup than on schools or roads, reports the Natural Resources Defense Council.
Joseph Lofthouse, seedsman from Paradise Utah, is now blogging about “Landrace Gardening” on Mother Earth News. The blog is a practical hands-on manual about how to improve crop production by localizing your plants to your unique garden.
Weather conditions impact spring migration – which migrants will you see this week?
The all-new RZT S ZERO is available in select markets and will be headlining the Cub Cadet Test Drive Experience Tour.
Are you ready for the kinds of severe weather that could impact the area where you live? National Severe Weather Preparedness Week takes place from Mar. 3-9, 2013. This is a great time for you and your family to “Be a Force of Nature” by learning the importance of planning for severe weather events and practicing how and where to take shelter before severe weather strikes.
Winter biking doesn't mean spending tons of money on new cold-weather gear. Adding a few essential items to your closet can help keep you warm during cold weather biking.
Does Punxsutawney Phil have competition for 'predicting' the weather? Take a look at these other animals and insects that can tell when the weather is changing, or can't they?
Keeping goats inside during nasty weather isn't easy, but it's worth the time! Dealing with sick goats, fever and runny noses isn't fun, so taking precautions makes things much easier.
Tips on how to stay safe and warm during extremely cold wind chill temperatures.
Tips on which birds to keep an eye out for in different weather conditions.
Getting prepared for cold weather is quite an undertaking with daylight growing shorter and shorter. Adding to your herd and selling goats takes a lot of planning.
Tips on how to travel safely and save gas during the Thanksgiving holiday.
Rural Living Today founder and advocate, Marie James, told us about a Homesteading Education Month event she and her family hosted in Northeast Washington to teach gardeners how to grow vegetables in cold weather.
In this posting we discuss how rock weathering controls the level of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. We also discuss why rock weathering can't remove the excess carbon dioxide in the atmosphere that was generated by our use of fossil fuels.
Tips on how to take part in citizen science projects during the fall!
In this posting we discuss how the record infection rate of West Nile virus is related to the record global temperatures of the past decade. We also discuss how these record temperatures have allowed the infections to occur in northern latitudes.
Tips on how to prepare yourself for a natural disaster during September's National Preparedness Month!
Research shows a direct connection between global warming and our extreme weather.
Environmentalist and journalist Bill McKibben clarifies the equations behind global warming, and points to the movement that could be spurred by the math.
We wanted to write up a post about asparagus to explain how farmers look at the crop, but also as a sort of apology to our customers. We have spent many hours in the field and on the phone seeking farmers with an existing asparagus supply. We had man
An article about how we learned to double our growing season and have home grown fresh veggies almost all year long.
The mild winter, early sring and continued warm weather are really messing up the normal sequene of bloom and availability of honeybee food. What will happen this summer is anyone's guess. Be Prepared.
Cam enjoys a magical walk through a winter wonderland while cutting and hauling firewood.
Potted greens are a good complement to greens in the hoop house soil.
It is not difficult to set up a backyard hoop house to extend your growing season. The result is abundant, delicious greens and extra months with your hands in the soil. Share information here on backyard hoop house gardening and cuisine.
Tips on how to conserve water in the fall with weather-based irrigation controllers.
So far this year extreme weather events has cost the US over 35 billion dollars. This posting discusses the potential for non-carbon-based renewable energy sources such as wind, solar and geothermal.
Tips on how to prepare for emergencies and/or natural disasters.
This posting will discuss the relationship of weather and climate and how global warming affects this relationship to trigger climate change
Cam appreciates all four of our seasons!
7/28/2010 now features customizable local weather applications, including an Agriculture Application with great tools for farmers and gardeners.
Blizzards, bitterly cold temperatures — the past few months have been full of wild weather stories, shared in the news and at the local coffee shops. What is your best wild weather story?
The National Wildlife Federation has released a report that explains the effects of climate change on winter weather. Warmer winters and heavy snow are causing problems for agriculture, wildlife, communities and even the skiing industry — and the NWF is calling for policy reforms to reduce emissions to slow the effects of global warming. Read on to learn more.
The Farmers’ Almanac is a blend of useful information, entertainment and fascinating lore.
More money from the Stimulus plan has gone to hot and cold states for weatherization programs.
If you live in an area with high summer temperatures try growing one of these greens to replace your spinach.
Helpful advice on the dangers of lightning and how to protect your home from its damaging effects.
Weatherizing your home saves you money. Just a few simple changes can greatly reduce the amount of energy your home requires to stay comfortable. Natural Home magazine editor-in-chief Robyn Griggs Lawrence fills you in on how to weatherize your home and collect stimulus money.
Is it too hot to grow spinach where you live? Try these fabulous alternatives.

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