aging





6/18/2009
Current research indicates that taking on challenging new activities might be one of the best things you can do to stay sharp — and we want to know what fun, challenging new activities you've tried recently. Whether it's woodworking, jazz clarinet or raising rabbits, tell us what you've been learning lately.
9/2/2011
Growing up on a New England homestead, a woman imparts heartfelt lessons about making do with what you have and cherishing those memories.
11/12/2008
Collect apples from old homestead trees for the best in flavor for sauce and pies.
1/25/2011
How to avoid food poisoning from poultry, which is widely contaminated with Campylobacter.
1/23/2013
Cam discovers he isn't as young as he once was while enjoying a sense of community at the local arena.
2/18/2015
Now it's time to gather your materials, thoughts, imagination, blend them together and your guitar plans. My plan is drawn out on old reversed-blue prints. I draw my plan in real size in case I have to scale for measurements.
8/13/2013
These sweet, wholesome scones come together in a flash and make use of August’s abundance of wild blackberries.
3/24/2015
Redbud's bright pink blossoms are one of the glories of spring, but they're not just eye candy. Those lovely blossoms have a delicious flavor that is like a green bean with a lemony aftertaste.
2/19/2009
You can find free food, such as wild carrots, cattail roots and crawfish, right in your neighborhood fields, swamps and creeks, and under rotten logs.
8/12/2009
Readers share tips and stories about wild food foraging.
6/24/2014
The fresh berry season is so fleeting, that it almost calls out for preserving, especially in the form of jam.
7/10/2013
Daylilies are usually appreciated for their showy flowers, but they also provide four different tasty ingredients. Wild food forager Leda Meredith shows you how to use the edible parts of the plant.
11/4/2008
A study shows that text message reminders increases voter turnout.
4/28/2015
"The Wild Wisdom of Weeds," by wild-foods advocate and author Katrina Blair, is the only book on foraging and wild edibles to focus on thirteen weeds found all over the world, which together comprise a complete food source and extensive medical pharmacy and first-aid kit. Blair’s philosophy is sobering, realistic, and ultimately optimistic: If we can open our eyes to see the wisdom found in these weeds right under our feet, instead of trying to eradicate an “invasive,” we could potentially achieve true food security and optimal health.
4/30/2015
Japanese knotweed is a voraciously invasive plant and the bane of many gardens. It is also a delicious and versatile wild food.
11/25/2013
Chickweed (Stellaria media) is a common garden weed that thrives in the cool temperatures of late fall and early spring. Here's how to identify and use this delicious wild vegetable.
6/5/2014
How to identify and use red clover (Trifolium pratense), plus a recipe for red clover blossom soda bread.
9/4/2013
Tastes like lemonade, has the beautiful blush color of rose wine, and comes from a plant that's almost certainly growing near you - here's how to make and use sumac extract.
1/13/2014
During the coldest months of winter, field garlic is still ready to be harvested. Even when the ground is too frozen for digging up the savory bulbs, the leaves can be used like chives.
5/29/2014
A relative of the artichoke, burdock is a common and versatile wild vegetable.
5/13/2014
Unlike many wild foods that take a long search, dandelions are found in almost every wood and meadow. And while many wild plants require special training to identify and discriminate from similar-looking poisonous plants, dandelions can be readily identified by every schoolchild.
12/20/2013
How to identify, harvest, and eat sunchokes (also known as Jerusalem artichokes). This root vegetable is a native North American plant that is at its best after a few frosts.
1/21/2015
Henbit and red dead nettle are two tasty leafy greens that are available even when there is snow on the ground. Here's how to identify them in the field and use them in recipes.
9/26/2014
Hidden inside the stinky orange pulp of the fruits of the ginkgo tree is a delicious, pistachio colored edible seed. Here's how to identify and prepare ginkgo (without the stinky parts) by foraging for ginkgo nuts!
8/8/2013
How to identify, harvest and cook with wood sorrel and sheep sorrel, both common weeds that have the same exquisite lemon flavor as cultivated French sorrel.
12/18/2013
Food preservationist Tammy Kimbler teaches you how to make apple pie fruit leather from urban-foraged apples.
7/11/2014
Peppergrass, a native North American plant in the mustard family, adds a spicy kick to recipes. Here's how to identify, sustainably harvest and use peppergrass.
9/18/2014
A series on fall mushrooms for foraging.
5/14/2015
Why we look forward to dandelion season each spring.
5/14/2013
It is a busy time for planting here. Not tomatoes, peppers, or squash, though. We got in our order of trees from the Missouri Conservation Dept. last week. In the past, we had planted mostly walnut, but we have a good enough supply of our own walnut seedlings that we are focusing on native trees that could use a boost to restore the forest to what it once was. So we are planting pecan on the bottom areas, shortleaf pine on ridge tops where the soil is poor, and burr oak on the better upland areas.
2/28/2014
Western culture has taught us to eat all the wrong things for all the wrong reasons.
4/11/2014
Violet leaves are one of the best wild edible salad greens. Their pretty, edible flowers are only in season for a few weeks.
11/25/2014
Concluding a series on fall mushroom foraging with two unusual looking suspects.
5/16/2014
Identifying, harvesting, and cooking the nutritionally complex spring treat, stinging nettle.
8/27/2014
Hawthorn fruits are in season in late summer and early fall. They are delicious, and also heart-healthy — eat your medicine!
3/11/2014
Garlic mustard has spicy, delicious leaves, flowers, seeds, and roots. It is an invasive species that may be harvested without sustainability concerns. In fact, you'll be doing your environment a favor if you eat this plant!
6/12/2014
Don't be fooled by false species. Enjoy real morels and fiddlehead ferns. Tips for identification and lessons learned from misidentifications.
6/7/2012
Harvesting abundance in the early spring.
8/9/2012
A brief story of how a creek was damaged and how it was reported to the authorities properly.
12/13/2011
Donna Pellegrin shares her mother's stories of growing up on a fertile, bountiful farm during the Great Depression, and of the homesteading skills that kept them well fed.
3/14/2011
Laundry detergent manufacturer reduces plastic by 66 percent in new easier-to-recycle bottles made from recycled cardboard and newspaper.
8/8/2012
Lacto-fermented swiss chard ribs and how to can them right along with foraging for wild mushrooms and a butternut squash update. Discovery Expedition vented fedora hat makes gardening cooler when the sun is blazing down.
6/10/2012
Getting started each day presents a major challenge to many people. With so many pressing demands, it's often difficult to know where to start. Feeling overwhelmed and panicked, you may end up frittering away your time. He's a trick to get you going.
6/20/2011
James E. Churchill’s advice for finding and preparing chicory, mint, catnip and blackberries, found in a 1970 issue of Mother Earth News, is timeless—and very timely right now.




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