remote living





7/19/2016
Being above the 56th parallel, we are in Zone 0, the harshest zone per Ag Canada. We're faced with a short, fickle growing season where frost can occur at any time during the summer months. We were faced with the daunting task of improving the poor boreal forest soil. Here is how we transformed the shallow, poor soils of the Precambrian Shield of our wilderness homestead into a rich garden loam.
7/11/2016
Growing vegetables at a high elevation can be very challenging. Over the years we have had to be flexible and creative in order to manage a small garden. We grow enough for our needs but not enough to put any vegetables up for future use. This blog post outlines some of the challenges we have faced and how we overcame them.
7/7/2016
A summer update from our wilderness homestead with an emphasis on how we get an early seasonal start to our gardens.
6/29/2016
Homesteading is an exciting life choice regardless of age, and one of the benefits is the remoteness. Seniors can be homesteaders, but just be prepared for hard physical work and be open to adjustment and change.
6/24/2016
We give the reader a better sense of the obstacles we were faced with when we decided to homestead in the Canadian wilderness.
6/6/2016
The second of a two-part series which recounts our experience with the terror of forest fires and how we survived them.
5/24/2016
Since moving to our isolated piece of heaven in 2000, we've had at least four serious forest-fire scares. One doesn't hear much about these fires in the north unless they threaten a community like Fort McMurray, Alberta. But the fires that have burned around us were equally as vicious and consumed over ¾ million acres. This 2-part blog series will look at the terror of forest fires and how to survive them.
5/14/2016
Ice out! The lake is finally ice free — it's time to put the boat in the water, dust off the fishing rods and stalk the creatures of the deep! Learn about springtime preparation on an ultra-remote homestead.
5/5/2016
They're back. The wolves. During breakfast one morning this past week, we heard a chorus of howling. Racing down to the shoreline, we saw 3 wolves in the center of the lake about a mile away. The wolves are a symbol of our wilderness location. Learn how we live with them and stay in touch with civilization.
5/2/2016
When we built our current home in 1992, there were very few rules and codes that could damage or destroy our dream of doing most of the work in building our cabin ourselves. Times like that are rapidly disappearing and those who build now must endure permits, inspections, delays and forced compliance. The dream of building your own home could be more complicated than just knowing construction techniques nowadays. Read our story.
4/15/2016
We thought we were doing the right thing when we moved to a remote area to live 19 years ago. The community is a landowners association with some who desire to change a beautiful remote-living area on acreage to resemble what they left. We thought living in an area with covenants and rules would protect our investment, but one should recognize that living remotely in a covenant community offers both positive and negative aspects.
3/28/2016
Wildfire is our greatest threat living in the mountains with all the dead vegetation and dead trees providing fuel. Here in Southern Colorado, where population density is less and forest growth is thick, sensible people plan ahead to mitigate wildfire risk. Plan ahead with these tips for wildfire mitigation.
2/3/2016
It takes special diligence and caution to keep domestic pets safe when living with wild predators around.
11/27/2015
Losing power is a reality that homesteaders must prepare for. It is not a matter of if, but when, and for how long. As a homesteader/farmsteader we have a responsibility to keep the home running regardless of “power.” This series of blog posts discusses homestead preparedness for power outages, beginning with fuel storage, gas cooking and wood heat.
11/23/2015
Homesteading in the mountains can be inconvenient, dangerous, challenging and lots of hard work.
5/8/2014
How to cope mentally with living in a remote location.
3/20/2014
Two homesteaders discuss their experience with the weather applicable to their mountain homesteads in Washington and Colorado.
2/19/2014
Ed and Bruce compare the weather and its impact on their mountain homesteads at different elevations and mountain ranges.
2/12/2014
Bruce McElmurray and Ed Essex collaborate on how the weather dictates to their mountain homesteading.
1/28/2013
How we deal with unexpected incidents.
3/23/2012
Options for phone service if you live in a remote location that doesn't have cell service or landlines available to you.
2/24/2012
Our typical day living in the mountains in the winter.
2/7/2012
How we avoid cabin fever by doing volunteer work and enjoying the beautiful outdoors.
1/24/2012
Many decisions go into remote living to decide if it is right for you.




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