Stovepipe Power: Using Waste Heat

If you've been thinking about ways of using waste heat from you cookstove rather than letting it escape, here are a number of suggested stovepipe modifications to make it possible.



stovepipe power fig 3, fig 4
FIG 3: The Palace Grand in Dawson City, Yukon Territory developed a drum-within-a-drum design to create a large hot air chamber that traps stovepipe heat and radiates it into the room. FIG 4: An unmodified 45 gallon steel drum could possibly serve the same purpose.
MOTHER EARTH NEWS STAFF
 stovepipe power fig 1, fig 2
FIG 1: In a single-storied structure, put the stove at one end of the building and carry the pipe horizontally to the other end and then out. FIG 2: In a structure with two or more stories, run the vent straight up through the rooms above.
ILLUSTRATION: MOTHER EARTH NEWS STAFF
stovepipe power fig 5
FIG 5: It involves a little plumbing, but the stovepipe could be routed through a 45 gallon drum fitted with a water inlet at the top and a spigot at the bottom, creating a water heater, radiator, and hot water supply all in one.
MOTHER EARTH NEWS STAFF
stovepipe power fig 6
FIG 6: A stovepipe fitted with an oven. You could buy one, or make one from a 45 gallon drum and Yukon can.
MOTHER EARTH NEWS STAFF
stovepipe power fig 7, fig 8
FIG 7: A  proposed concentric double stovepipe in which the inner pipe is an intake drawing exterior air and the outer is an exhaust pipe that warms the inflow. FIG: At the stove end of a concentric pipe design, the intake should be routed through the bottom of the firebox into the ash box chamber.
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