Solar News Space-Based Solar Power and Improved Water Electrolysis

This small collection of solar news stories looks at water electrolysis technology and the planned launch of components that might someday be used in a space-based solar power system.

space based solar power - satellite beaming energy to Earth

Space-based solar power is a long way in the future at best, but if it's ever going to be feasible now is the time to test it.

Illustration by Fortolia/Maxim Boldyrev

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The following solar news stories were drawn from multiple sources.

Space-Based Solar Power

In 1984, the space shuttle will carry a ten-story-tall solar array wing that — remarkably — will be only four inches thick when folded in the craft's cargo bay, but when extended will measure 105 feet long and 15 1/2 feet wide. The structure, which consists of printed-circuit solar cells "welded" to a super-lightweight plastic film, will produce 12.5 kilowatts and is considered a first step toward the still ecologically questionable large-scale ·generation of electricity from sunlight in outer space.

Improved Water Electrolysis

Three different "breakthrough" techniques for putting sunlight to work to extract hydrogen from water, for use as a fuel and for fertilizer and plastics production, were announced within the span of a month recently. But the proliferation of reported advances may be as much a reflection of intense competition among researchers as an indication of significant steps forward. Hydrogen produced by solar water splitters isn't cost competitive with fossil fuels just yet ... but, says one scientist, "the gap is narrowing."

In Brief

  • With over four acres of glass, the planned 500,000 square foot Enoch Square Mall in Glasgow, Scotland will be ·one of the world's largest passive solar glass-enclosed structures.
  • Scientists say more-economical solar collector surfaces may be developed using 2,000-year-old techniques employed by the Chinese to coat swords and art objects with a dark, protective patina.
  • A "Soviet Sun City" powered with wind and solar energy is being built by the U.S.S.R. in Central Asia, and will house more than 300 scientists.