Understand Solar Financial Benefits with the Solar Panel Payback Period


| 10/26/2015 10:18:00 AM


Tags: solar power, solar financing, home energy, Vikram Aggarwal, Massachusetts,

Understanding Solar Panel Payback Period

The financial benefits of going solar are now well documented. Solar panel systems actually function as investments with strong rates of return, and homeowners generating solar electricity can avoid paying increased utility rates by eliminating their electricity bills. According to a 2015 report by the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, installing solar panels on your home can even increase your property values. If you’re reviewing multiple quotes, there are plenty of metrics that can help you make a decision about which solar option is best for you, but studies show most solar shoppers rely on one metric in particular: the solar panel payback period.

The solar panel payback period is a calculation that estimates how long it will take for you to “break even” on your solar energy investment. Increased utility electricity rates and lower equipment costs are making it easier and less expensive to for homeowners to own, rather than lease, their solar panel systems. Comparing the payback period of various quotes from solar installers is an easy way to comprehend the financial merits of each option, and identify the point in time at which your solar investment will start to earn you money.

How is the Solar-Panel Payback Period Calculated?

To calculate your solar panel payback period, you need to determine the combined costs and annual benefits of going solar. To understand each component, you will need to know the following:

Gross cost of solar panel system: The gross cost of installing solar on your home is dependent on the size of the system you select and the equipment that makes up that system.
• Value of up-front financial incentives:
Tax breaks and rebates can dramatically reduce the cost of going solar.  The federal investment tax credit allows you to deduct 30% of the cost of your system from your taxes, and additional state and local financial incentives may also be available in your area.
• Average monthly electricity use:
The amount of electricity that you consume monthly is an indicator of both the size of system you need and the amount of electricity that you can offset each month with solar. The higher your electricity bills are, the shorter your estimated payback period will be, as you can reduce or eliminate this bill as soon as your panels are operational.
• Estimated electricity generation:
While solar installers will try to provide you with a system that matches your electricity consumption, practical constraints like the size of your roof and seasonal weather variation may impact the amount of electricity that you can produce on-site.
• Additional financial incentives:
In some areas of the country, you may be able to earn additional incentives in the form of solar renewable energy certificates (SRECs) or other utility programs that give you a per kilowatt-hour credit for the electricity that your solar panels generate.  Depending on the size of your solar energy system, these can represent a significant monetary benefit.

Take the following steps to calculate your payback period:




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