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Best States for Energy Efficiency

By Jessie Fetterling


Tags: ACEEE, California, energy efficiency,

Let’s all stop and applaud California. This year, the state ranks first on the American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy’s (ACEEE) list of U.S. states that use energy efficiency policies, programs and practices as the first step in improving their economies. Among the top 10 — along with the golden state — are Oregon, Washington, Minnesota, Wisconsin, New Jersey, New York, Connecticut, Massachusetts and Vermont.

ACEEE first started ranking states in 2006 as a way to encourage each state to promote energy independence and efficiency. The 2008 scorecard rates and ranks each state on a 50-point scale for their energy efficiency policy initiatives, including:

  • Utility-sector and public benefits efficiency programs and policies
  • Transportation and land use policies
  • Building energy codes
  • Combined heat and power (CHP)
  • Appliance efficiency standards
  • Energy efficiency in public buildings and fleets
  • Research, development, and deployment (RD&D)
  • Financial incentives for efficient technologies

Follow the scorecard tweets to keep current on how your state ranks. And let us know what you think of your state’s performance by posting a comment below.

miggsathon
10/9/2008 11:23:21 AM

Good to see a scorecard on efficiency. I'm associated with Recycled Energy Development (RED, recycled-energy.com), a company that does energy recycling (which above is called combined heat & power, or CHP). The idea is to turn heat that would normally be wasted into clean power and steam. RED does it mainly at manufacturing facilities, but it can be done elsewhere too. EPA and DoE estimates suggest energy recycling could cut U.S. global warming pollution by 20%. That's as much as if we took every car off the road. Meanwhile, we'd SAVE money because we'd be producing power more efficiently. So why isn't more being done? Simple: utilities get monopoly protections, making it hard for cheaper, cleaner options to emerge.