A Guide to Syrup Trees

Most people could probably tell you natural syrup comes from trees, but couldn't tell you just how many different kinds of syrup trees there are. This guide can get you started identifying them.



067 syrup trees - bigleaf maple
The bigleaf  maple's range is primarily in the western U.S. and Canada.
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067 syrup trees - norway maple
Norway maples were introduced to the U.S. from Europe.
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067 syrup trees - boxelder
Boxelders are also often found growing along stream banks, primarily in the eastern U.S. and Canada.
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067 syrup trees - red maple
Stream banks, swamps, valleys, and uplands are the main habitat of the red maple, but sometimes they'll grow on dry ridges. 
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067 syrup trees - silver maple
Silver maple grow best in moist soils and are most often found growing along stream banks.
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067 syrup trees - black maple
Black maples generally grow in mixed hardwood forests in valleys and uplands.
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067 syrup trees - sweet birch
The sweet birch grows from southern Quebec to northern Alabama and as far west as Ohio.
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067 syrup trees - florida maple
Although named "Florida" maple, this tree grows across the southeastern U.S. and as far west as Oklahoma.
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067 syrup trees - sugar maple
Sugar maples, the only tree tapped for commercial syrup production, grow from eastern Canada to northern Georgia.
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067 syrup trees - canyon maple
Canyon maples grow best in mountain canyons with moist soil.
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