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Raspberry Shrub Drinking Vinegar Recipe

By Tammy Kimbler

Tags: raspberries, vinegar, Tammy Kimbler, Minneapolis, champagne,

During the summer months I freeze most of my raspberry crop to eat during the winter. As the days darken, raspberries liven up my dishes. One of my favorite things to make with raspberries is a shrub, which is particularly festive for the holidays because of it’s bright red color. Known as “drinking vinegar,” a shrub is a vinegar syrup made by infusing fruit, herbs and spices. Mixed with sparkling water, champagne, or spirits, a shrub makes a refreshing cocktail. Common in colonial times, but dating back much farther in history, the vinegar preserves the ingredients and is shelf stable. Best of all, shrubs are a breeze to make.

Raspberry Shrub with Champagne

Raspberry Shrub Recipe


• 3 cups raspberries, fresh or frozen
• 3 cups red wine vinegar
• 1 cup sugar


1. Sterilize a quart jar in boiling water for 10 minutes. In a sauce pan heat the vinegar and sugar until the sugar dissolves.

2. Cool. When room temp, add the raspberries to the jar and pour the vinegar sugar liquid over top. Top with a lid and let sit for a week or two to infuse.

3. When ready, strain out the raspberries and return to the jar or bottle and give as gifts.

4. To serve, pour 1 shot of shrub in a champagne glass and top with chilled champagne, sparkling water or ginger ale. Happy Holidays!

Tammy Kimbler is the blogger of One tomato, two tomato. A cultivator at heart, Tammy’s passions lie with food, preservation, gardening and connecting to her local community through blogging and urban agriculture. She eats well and love to feed others as often as possible. She currently resides with her family in Minneapolis, Minnesota.

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