Making Syrup From Pacific Northwest Trees

Although the well-known sugar maple only grows in the eastern U.S., a variety of Pacific Northwest trees are also potential sources of sap for making syrup.



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Drill a 3/4-inch diameter hole about 1" to 2" deep in a likely tree and insert a tight-fitting plastic or wooden tube. Leave a small "collection space" between the end of the tube and the back and the back of the hole.
PHOTO: TERRY DOMICO
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Cover hanging containers to keep precipitation, dirt, and bark from falling in.
TERRY DOMICO
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You'll hit some "dry" trees, but occasionally you'll also hit a "gusher" that yields a gallon or more in one day.
TERRY DOMICO
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Hang a pail or other container under the tree tap.
TERRY DOMICO
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The collected sap is condensed by steaming at 170°F in a large cast iron pot. 
TERRY DOMICO

















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