How Prevalent Is Drug-Laced Halloween Candy, Really?


| 10/24/2014 8:45:00 AM


Tags: Halloween, Halloween candy, Kayla Matthews, Pennsylvania,

drug-laced candy

Razor blades in apples, poison in caramel coating, and drug-infused candy: it seems as though each year brings a new culinary threat to unsuspecting trick-or-treaters.

This year police departments have become exceptionally profuse in their warnings to parents to be on the lookout for marijuana infused candy, partially because of the drug’s legalization in several U.S. states.

The fear comes from the popularity of manufactured THC treats like pot-lollipops and from the private practice of adding THC to common candies like gummy bears. As there is no way to tell the difference between drugged and regular unpackaged candy by sight alone, police are warning parents not to allow their children any candy not in its original wrappers and, furthermore, to inspect even that candy thoroughly.

The media and police departments have been issuing similar warnings for decades, which begs the question: how prevalent is drug-laced Halloween candy, really?

No Evidence

Despite the popularity of such warnings, there has never been any reported cases of kids ingesting drug-laced — THC or otherwise — Halloween candies.




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