Honey Wheat Bread Recipe

This Honey Wheat Bread Recipe makes a delicious wheat bread made with natural honey.

Use this Honey Wheat Bread Recipe to create this honey-sweetened bread.

Use this Honey Wheat Bread Recipe to create this honey-sweetened bread.

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Try this Honey Wheat Bread Recipe made with wheat and using naturally sweet honey.

Honey Wheat Bread Recipe

My first successful whole wheat bread was also the first batch I made with honey. Here's how:

For two rather small loaves, take two cups of warm water (110-115 degrees) and add two tablespoons of honey and a little active dry yeast or use cooler water and compressed yeast. After the leavening begins to "work", add a pinch or two of salt if desired and one tablespoon of oil (I'm partial to sesame seed oil) if you want to. Then add whole wheat-flour to make a dough which is just barely stiff enough to handle, turn it out onto a well-floured board or what have you and knead in more flour (just enough so the stuff doesn't stick anymore). Knead the mass for about ten minutes, or until its texture feels right or until you're just plain sick of kneading.

Divide the dough in half, make two balls and place them on a greased cookie sheet or whatever flat pan you can find. Do not use a loaf pan, or you might never get the bread out. Grease the loaves well — I also grease my hands before I shape the rounds.

Put the bread into a cold oven and turn the heat on low (about 200 degrees) for 20 minutes or so. At the end of this time pull the loaves out and cut slashes in their tops. Replace the flat sheet or pan in the oven, turn the heat up to about 300 degrees and bake the loaves for about an hour.

This is a fairly heavy bread, close grained and hearty. We like it hot out of the oven with butter or honey or jam or cold for sandwiches or toasted. One of the great things about the recipe is the way you can abuse it and still get fine results. I seldom measure anything these days, and often add soybean flour, dry milk powder, nutritional yeast, wheat germ, sunflower or sesame seeds, nuts, dry fruits, etc. More honey makes a sweeter loaf that is especially good toasted. I often eliminate the oil altogether except for what's needed to grease the dough and the pan. The last batch I made got left in the oven at 200 degrees for over an hour before anyone turned up the heat. It was delicious.

Our favorite spread for our favorite bread is made by mixing equal parts of any real peanut butter (prepared from just peanuts) and light honey. Peanut butter and honey and jelly sandwiches are very popular with us, too.


Read more about how to cook with honey: Cooking With Honey: Recipes and Tips.