Study Shows Elevated Levels of Inorganic Arsenic in U.S. Chicken Meat

Chickens likely raised with arsenic-based drugs result in chicken meat that has higher levels of inorganic arsenic, which is known to increase the risk of cancer.


| June 18, 2013



Raw chicken legs

Arsenic-based drugs have been used for decades to make poultry grow faster and improve the pigmentation of the meat.


Photo by Fotolia/evp82

A press release from Rep. Louise M. Slaughter.

A new study by Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future revealed that chickens likely raised with arsenic-based drugs produced meat with higher levels of arsenic, posing a public health risk to consumers. Congresswoman Louise M. Slaughter (D-NY), the only microbiologist in Congress and a leader on legislation that would stop the overuse of antibiotics on food-animals and protect consumers from antibiotic-resistant bacteria in their food, said that the study should be a wake-up call to federal regulators.

“This study further highlights the danger lurking on our dinner plates and the ongoing refusal of the FDA to protect American families from that danger,” Rep. Slaughter said. “Whether it's stopping the routine use of antibiotics on food animals or ensuring that dangerous carcinogens like arsenic are not contained in meat, it's time for the FDA to stop defending industry profits and start protecting consumers.”

Read the press release from Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future below.

Study Shows Elevated Levels of Arsenic in U.S. Chicken Meat

Hub staff report: May 13, 2013





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