Chinese Watercress Recipe

This Chinese Watercress Recipe uses food foraged from the wild to make this delicious sauteed watercress meal.

Use watercress leaves to make this Chinese Watercress Recipe. Watercress grows all over the United States and in the Southern parts of Canada.

Use watercress leaves to make this Chinese Watercress Recipe. Watercress grows all over the United States and in the Southern parts of Canada.

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Learn how to make this Chinese Watercress Recipe using food foraged from the wild.

Pull on a pair of waterproof boots, find an old pair of scissors and gather some watercress for this recipe.

Watercress grows in clear, cold, flowing brooks all over the United States and Southern Canada. There are two things to remember about this plant: (1) It might be polluted if you find it growing in a polluted stream and (2) Never pull it up. Watercress should always be cut off just above its white roots.

If you suspect that your favorite watercress brook is contaminated, soak the "cress" in water containing dissolved Halazone tablets. The tablets, of course, can be purchased at almost any drugstore. Use according to directions. And see what you can do about halting the pollution at its source.

After you've gathered a good quantity of watercress try some as an addition to a meat sandwich or tossed salad or cook them as boiling greens. Boiling greens are made by placing a double handful of cleaned watercress in a saucepan. Cover with water, set on the fire and boil for three minutes. Remove, drain, add a pat of butter, season and serve.

Chinese Watercress Recipe

Chinese watercress is probably the most vitamin-filled way to serve this plant. Heat two tablespoons of cooking oil in a large skillet. Sprinkle one tablespoon of grated fresh ginger root into the hot oil and cook two minutes. Add one pound of washed watercress. Stir and cook for four minutes. Remove from heat, toss with a few drops of soysauce and serve. Now you're ready to relax with a cup of birch tea.


Read more about wild food recipes and preparation: Foraging for Wild Foods in Winter.